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Canada's controlled goods program

Canada's Controlled Goods Program
Canada's Controlled Goods Program (CGP)
Executive Summary

Objective:
The objective of this paper is to identify those sections of the Schedule to the Defence Production Act (DPA) that are no longer relevant to the Control ed Goods Program (CGP) and therefore should be removed from the Schedule of "control ed goods".
Background:
CADSI supports the interests of its members by helping to create an environment that al ows sustainment and growth of its individual companies so that they remain competitive at home and abroad. In our view the current and proposed direction of the CGP is unnecessarily constraining and unduly harming the day-to-day activities of our members. We are particularly concerned with the CGP Schedule: We believe that it is out-of-date and includes goods and technology that are no longer relevant to the CGP or to its original Mandate. Canada's Control ed Goods Program (CGP), administered by the Department of Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), was introduced in 2001 to address U.S. Government concerns that U.S. Munitions List (USML) goods and technology under the International Traf ic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) were not adequately protected from unauthorised access in, and export from, Canada. The Mandate of the CGP was to ensure that persons in Canada 'examining, possessing or transferring' "control ed goods" as listed in the Schedule to the DPA were authorised to do so through a basic registration program. In 2001 the Canadian Schedule of "control ed goods" was equivalent to USML goods and technology. The Schedule of "control ed goods" has remained static over the past 12 years although many goods and technologies are no longer included in the USML. In addition, the U.S. is proposing to remove many more items from It is our view, therefore, since the CGP Mandate was designed to address USML goods and technologies only, any removal of goods and technology from the USML should coincidently af ect the Schedule. By way of illustration, if the U.S. moved to add certain goods and technology to the USML the US Government would, under the 2000 Canada/U.S. Arrangement, quite rightly expect Canada to amend its Schedule to include new items. Therefore, any removal of goods and technology from the USML should be met with equivalent changes to the Schedule.
There are two Annexes included in this Summary: Annex A identifies goods and technology that are currently not
included in the USML but remain listed on Canada's Schedule of "control ed goods". Annex B includes goods and
technology that are proposed for removal from the USML as wel as goods and technology proposed for retention on Below are examples of goods and technologies that are no longer on the USML but remain on the Schedule 1. Black-out lighting on vehicles (2-6) which make the entire vehicle CGP-controlled 2. Chem-Bio Protective clothing (2-7) 3. ALL forgings and castings (2-16). USML includes only certain forgings and castings. 4. ALL missile test/production equipment (6-1.B. & 6-2.B.) 5. MANY turbojet and turbofan engines (6-3.A.) 1 "controlled goods" are listed in the ‘Schedule' to the Defence Production Act and cover most of ECL Group 2, al of ECL Group 6
and all of ECL Item 5504.
2 The numbers identified in each of the items (e.g., 2-7) refer to ECL Item numbers.
Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)

Canada's Controlled Goods Program
6. Production equipment, e.g., spin forming/flow forming machines (6-3.B.). Many Canadian companies, regardless of which industry sector, use these machines in day-to-day operations. Composite structures and laminates (6-6.A.) 7. Equipment for production of fibres, prepregs or preforms like filament winding, tape laying and weaving machines (6-6.B.). Many Canadian companies covering a broad range of sectors use these machines in the normal course of manufacturing. 8. Materials for missile components (6-6.C.) – DFAIT tends to categorise al such materials as applicable to missiles unless there was categorical proof that the application was not missiles 9. A wide-range of civil aircraft articles such as linear accelerometers (6-9.A.3.), gyros of any type (6-9.A.5), integrated navigation systems (6-9.A.7.) and magnetic heading sensors (6-9.A.8.) 10. Test and production equipment for 6-9.A. items (6-9.B.) 11. Wind tunnels (6-15.B.2) and environmental chambers (6-15.B.4.) 12. Global Navigation Satel ite Systems (5504) Below are examples of goods and technologies that are proposed for removal from the USML but remain on the USML and therefore the Schedule for the time being: 1. Explosives and other energetic materials (USML Category V) that have broad commercial applications. 2. Many general parts and components for surface vessels of war and other special naval equipment (USML Category VI) unless specifical y identified in the USML. 3. Submersible and semi-submersible vessels (USML Category XX) unless they meet certain criteria. 4. Gas turbine engines and associated equipment for land, air and sea (USML Category XIX) including turboshaft or turboprop engines and their parts and components unless specifical y identified in the USML. 5. Ground vehicles (USML Category VI ), unless the vehicle or its parts and components are specifically identified in Category VI . 6. Aircraft and related articles (USML Category VI I), unless the specific article or part/component is listed in 7. A wide range of fire control, range finder, optical and guidance and control equipment (Category XII). 8. A broad range of auxil ary and miscel aneous equipment (Category XI I) like certain cameras and specialised processing equipment, photo-interpretation, stereoscopic plot ing, and photogrammetry equipment for military purposes. 9. A broad range of personal protective equipment (e.g., anti-gravity suits, pressure suits, and atmosphere diving suits) and shelters, including a broad range of parts and components. CADSI members 'examining, possessing or transferring' any of the above goods and technologies in Canada are required to be CGP-registered. However, if the same companies were located in the U.S. and were manufacturers or exporters of Annex A goods or technologies they would not need to register under the ITAR because Annex A
goods and technology are NOT ITAR/USML-control ed. An equivalent amendment to the Schedule of "control ed goods" would remove a broad range of Canadian companies form the CGP thereby placing them on an equivalent competitive basis as their foreign competitors, both in the U.S. and global y!
Likewise, if the proposed changes as outlined in Annex B come to fruition, a broad range of U.S. companies would
no longer be required to be ITAR-registered. If Canadian companies manufacturing or exporting Annex B goods that
wil be released from ITAR control were situated in the U.S. they would not need to register under the ITAR because Annex B goods and technology would NOT be ITAR/USML-control ed. Equivalent changes to the Schedule of
"control ed goods" would remove a broad range of Canadian companies from the CGP thereby placing them on an equivalent competitive basis as their foreign competitors, both in the U.S. and global y! It is our view that if the mandate and rationale for the establishment of the CGP stil applied then Canadian industry should be treated no more restrictive than similar or equivalent companies in the U.S. While the direct impact on Canadian industry is dif icult to quantify, clearly the Schedule includes goods and technology that are no longer relevant to U.S. ITAR interests and in our view are no longer relevant as goods and technology that necessitate CGP Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
scrutiny. At the moment U.S. companies competing with Canadian companies in Annex A goods and technology are not subject to restrictions equivalent to those in ef ect under the CGP. Furthermore, other foreign competitors are not subject to equivalent CGP-type controls. CGP controls are not only costly to implement and maintain thereby af ecting Canadian profit margins but make Canadian Annex A goods and technology less competitive to those of other foreign competitors. If goods and technology listed in Annex B are removed from the USML Canadian industry, and CADSI members in particular, wil fal further behind U.S. and other foreign competitors. Should the significant changes contemplated under current U.S. proposals come to fruition there would be ample justification for amending the Schedule to reflect the bilateral (U.S.) and multilateral (Wassenaar) arrangements. It is important to note that under current U.S. EAR provisions exports of CCL goods and technology to Canada are licence-free. It is expected that this same provision wil continue to apply once current USML goods and technology are transferred to the CCL. The Canadian government continues to actively seek export markets beyond those of the U.S. This is partly as a result of the current U.S. economic crisis and partly as a result of our desire to diversify our international market base. CADSI members need to compete on an equal and unconstrained basis as its foreign competitors. It is our view that the current CGP is a constraint unparal eled in other competitor countries.
Conclusion:
Since the CGP was instituted to meet a U.S. concern it only seems reasonable that it keep pace with those concerns. In this regard, and consistent with the Canada/U.S. Agreement that mandated the CGP in 2000, CADSI has identified three positive impacts for Canadian industry if the CGP kept pace with U.S. ITAR changes.
First, the removal of goods and technology from the 'Schedule' that are no longer listed on the USML would result in
an immediate benefit to Canadian industry by de-registering a broad range of companies that examine, possess or transfer the current list of "control ed goods".
Second, should the U.S. proposal to remove a significant number of parts and components from the USML come to
fruition, the number of U.S. manufacturers currently required to be registered under the ITAR wil decrease, perhaps substantially. We believe that Canadian companies should benefit similarly: That is, through an amended 'Schedule' of goods and technology the number of CGP-registered companies would decrease proportionately thereby al owing Canadian companies to compete on a more level playing field with foreign companies.
Third, these changes wil result in an immediate reduction in administrative and operational costs to Canadian
industry thereby reducing their costs of doing business.
Recommendations:

On the basis of the above, we have three proposed recommendations: 1. Recommendation 1: Short Term (ANNEX A):
It is recommended that PWGSC make immediate changes to the 'Schedule' based on the at ached Annex A. Annex A identifies those goods and technology that are not part of the USML and therefore not relevant 2. Recommendation 2: Mid-Term (ANNEX B):
It is recommended that once the changes to the USML occur that PWGSC make changes to the Schedule based on Annex B. Annex B identifies those goods and technology that the U.S. Government is proposing be removed from the USML because they consider them no longer relevant to the ITAR or USML. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
3. Longer-Term/Ongoing Solution:
That PWGSC establish policies, procedures and the Schedule that ensure that the CGP remain evergreen. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
Recommendation 1: Short Term:
That PWGSC make immediate changes to the Schedule based on the information contained in this
Annex. This Annex identifies those goods and technology that are not part of the USML and
therefore not relevant to ITAR.
This Annex identifies CGP goods and technologies that are no longer listed on the US Munitions List (USML) but remain on the CGP Schedule . The goods and technologies listed on Canada's Schedule to the Defence Production Act (DPA) are known as "control ed goods" .
Specific Items Listed on the Schedule but NOT on the USML

2-1: The only control ed goods under 2-1 are prohibited firearms. Most articles in this entry are not prohibited
2-3: The only control ed ammunition under 2-3 is that which is for prohibited firearms control ed under 2-1.
2-8.e.3. BDNPA (bis (2,2-dinitropropyl)acetal) (CAS 5108-69-0);
2-8.e.4. BDNPF (bis (2,2-dinitropropyl)formal) (CAS 5917-61-3); 2-8.e.6. Energetic monomers, plasticizers or polymers, special y formulated for military use and containing any of the a. Nitro groups; b. Azido groups; c. Nitrate groups; d. Nitraza groups; or
e. Difluoroamino groups; e. Other adducted polymer ferrocene derivatives; 2-8.f.18. Propyleneimine (2-methyl-aziridine) (CAS 75-55-8); 2-9.a.2.c. Having al of the fol owing: 1. ‘Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) protection'; and
2. ‘Pre-wet or wash down system' designed for decontamination purposes; or

Technical Notes:
1. ‘CBRN protection' is a self contained interior space containing features such as over-pressurization, isolation of ventilation systems, limited ventilation openings with CBRN filters and limited personnel access points incorporating 2. ‘Pre-wet or wash down system' is a seawater spray system capable of simultaneously wet ing the exterior superstructure and decks of a vessel. 3 It is important to note that some items on the 'Schedule', in particular, some items in ECL Group 6, were never listed in the USML.
4 Since the Schedule is very technical and precise any attempt to summarise it could result in the elimination of specific meanings
associated with the individual items contained in the ‘Schedule'. However, it is possible to summarise classes of goods and
technology that are included in the ‘Schedule', but not in the USML.
5 The numbers identified in each item above are ECL Item numbers/sub-item numbers, (e.g., 2-1)

Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
2-9.d. Anti-submarine nets and anti-torpedo nets, specially designed for military use; 2-9.f. Hul penetrators and connectors, special y designed for military use, that enable interaction with equipment external to a vessel, and components therefor specially designed for military use; 2-9.g. Silent bearings having any of the fol owing, components therefor and equipment containing those bearings, specially designed for military use: 1. Gas or magnetic suspension; 2. Active signature controls; or
3. Vibration suppression controls. 2-6 Note 2: d. Black-out lighting. 2-10.e. Airborne equipment, including airborne refuel ing equipment, special y designed for use with the "aircraft" specified by 2-10.a. or 2-10.b. or the aeroengines specified by 2-10.d., and special y designed components therefor; 2-10.f. Pressure refuel ers, pressure refuel ing equipment, equipment special y designed to facilitate operations in confined areas and ground equipment, developed special y for "aircraft" specified by 2-10.a. or 2-10.b., or for aero- engines specified by 2-10.d.; 2-10.h. Parachutes, paragliders and related equipment, as fol ows, and special y designed components therefor: 1. Parachutes not specified elsewhere in the Munitions List; 3. Equipment special y designed for high altitude parachutists (e.g., suits, special helmets, breathing systems, navigation equipment); 2-10.i. Automatic piloting systems for parachuted loads; equipment special y designed or modified for military use for controlled opening jumps at any height, including oxygen equipment. 2-5.d. Field test or alignment equipment, special y designed for items specified by 2-5.a., 2-5.b. or 2-5.c. 2-7.d. "Riot control agents", active constituent chemicals and combinations thereof, including: 6. N-Nonanoylmorpholine, (MPA) (CAS 5299-64-9); 2-7.f.1. includes: a. Air conditioning units special y designed or modified for nuclear, biological or chemical filtration; b. Protective clothing. For civil gas masks, protective and decontamination equipment, see also 1-1.A.4. on the Dual-Use List. 2-7.i.1. "Biocatalysts" special y designed for the decontamination or degradation of CW agents specified by 2-7.b. resulting from directed laboratory selection or genetic manipulation of biological systems; 2-7.i.2. Biological systems as follows: "expression vectors", viruses or cultures of cel s, containing the genetic information specific to the production of "biocatalysts" specified by 2-7.i.1. 2-16. Forgings, castings and other unfinished products, the use of which in a specified product is identifiable by material composition, geometry or function, and which are specially designed for any products specified by 2-1.to 2-4., 2-6., 2-9., 2-10., 2-12. or 2-19 2-9.b.4. ‘Air Independent Propulsion' (AIP) systems special y designed for submarines; Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
2-20. Cryogenic and "superconductive" equipment, as follows, and special y designed components and accessories a. Equipment special y designed or configured to be instal ed in a vehicle for military ground, marine, airborne or space applications, capable of operating while in motion and of producing or maintaining temperatures below 103 K (-170° C); 2-20.a. includes mobile systems incorporating or employing accessories or components manufactured from non-metallic or non-electrical conductive materials, such as plastics or epoxy-impregnated materials. b. "Superconductive" electrical equipment (rotating machinery and transformers) special y designed or configured to be installed in a vehicle for military ground, marine, airborne or space applications and capable of operating while in motion. 2-20.b. does not apply to direct-current hybrid homopolar generators that have single-pole normal metal armatures which rotate in a magnetic field produced by superconducting windings, provided those windings are the only superconducting components in the generator. 6-1.B. Test and Production Equipment 6-1.B.1. "Production facilities" special y designed for the systems specified in 6-1.A. 6-1.D. Software 6-1.D.1. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of "production facilities" specified in 6-1.B. 6-1.D.2. "Software" which coordinates the function of more than one subsystem, special y designed or modified for "use" in systems specified in 6-1.A. 6-1.E. Technology 6-1.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment or "software" specified in 6-1.A., 6-1.B., or 6-1.D. 6-2.B. Test and Production Equipment 6-2.B.1. Production facilities" special y designed for the subsystems specified in 6-2.A. 6-2.B.2. "Production equipment" special y designed for the subsystems specified in 6-2.A. 6-2.D. Software 6-2.D.1. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of "production facilities" specified in 6-2.B.1. 6-2.D.2. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of rocket motors or engines specified in 6-2.A.1.c. 6-2.D.3. "Software", special y designed or modified for the "use" of ‘guidance sets' specified in 6-2.A.1.d. 6-2.D.3. includes "software", special y designed or modified to enhance the performance of ´guidance sets´ to achieve or exceed the accuracy specified in 6-2.A.1.d. 6-2.D.4. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of subsystems or equipment specified in 6-2.A.1.b.3. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
6-2.D.5. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of systems in 6-2.A.1.e. 6-2.D.6. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of systems in 6-2.A.1.f.
Notes to 6-2.D:

Subject to end-use statements appropriate for the excepted end-use, "software" control ed by 6-2.D.2. to 6-2.D.6. may be treated as Category II as fol ows: 1. Under 6-2.D.2. if specially designed or modified for liquid propel ant apogee engines, designed or modified for satel ite applications as specified in the Note to 6-2.A.1.c.; 2. Under 6-2.D.3. if designed for missiles with a "range" of under 300 km or manned aircraft; 3. Under 6-2.D.4. if special y designed or modified for re-entry vehicles designed for non-weapon payloads; 4. Under 6-2.D.5. if designed for rocket systems that do not exceed the "range" "payload" capability of systems specified in 6-1.A.; 5. Under 6-2.D.6. if designed for systems other than those specified in 6-1.A. 6-2.E. Technology 6-2.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment or "software" specified in 6-2.A., 6-2.B. or 6-2.D. 6-3.A.1. Turbojet (not qualified) and turbofan engines, as fol ows: a. Engines having both of the fol owing characteristics:
6-3.A.1.a. 10 g rms is a different number than the USML entry

6-3.A.7. Radial bal bearings having al tolerances specified in accordance with ISO 492 Tolerance Class 2 (or ANSI/ABMA Std 20 Tolerance Class ABEC-9 or other national equivalents), or better and having al the following characteristics: a. An inner ring bore diameter between 12 and 50 mm; b. An outer ring outside diameter between 25 and 100 mm; and
c. A width between 10 and 20 mm. 6-3.A.8. Liquid propel ant tanks specially designed for the propel ants control ed in Item 6-4.C. or other liquid propel ants used in the systems specified in 6-1.A.1. 6-3.A.9. ‘Turboprop engine systems' special y designed for the systems in 6-1.A.2. or 6-19.A.2., and specially designed components therefor, having a maximum power greater than 10 kW (achieved uninstal ed at sea level standard conditions), excluding civil certified engines.
Technical Note for 6-3.A.9.:

For the purposes of Item 6-3.A.9., a ‘turboprop engine system' incorporates al of the fol owing: a. Turboshaft engine; and b. Power transmission system to transfer the power to a propel er. 6-3.B. Test and Production Equipment Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
6-3.B.1. "Production facilities" special y designed for equipment or materials specified in 6-3.A.1., 6-3.A.2., 6-3.A.3., 6-3.A.4., 6-3.A.5., 6-3.A.6., 6-3.A.8., 6-3.A.9. or 6-3.C. 6-3.B.2. "Production equipment" special y designed for equipment or materials specified in 6-3.A.1., 6-3.A.2., 6-3.A.3., 6-3.A.4., 6-3.A.5., 6-3.A.6. 6-3.A.8., 6-3.A.9. or 6-3.C. 6-3.B.3. Flow-forming machines, and special y designed components therefor, which: a. According to the manufacturers technical specification can be equipped with numerical control units or a computer control, even when not equipped with such units at delivery; and
b. Have more than two axes which can be co-ordinated simultaneously for contouring control.
Note to 6-3.B.:

This item does not include machines that are not usable in the "production" of propulsion components and equipment (e.g. motor cases) for systems specified in 6-1.A.
Technical Note to 6-3.B.:

Machines combining the function of spin-forming and flow-forming are, for the purpose of this item, regarded as flow- forming machines.
Technical Note to 6-3.C.:

In 6-3.C.2. ‘insulation' intended to be applied to the components of a rocket motor, i.e. the case, nozzle inlets, case closures, includes cured or semi-cured compounded rubber sheet stock containing an insulating or refractory material. It may also be incorporated as stress relief boots or flaps specified in 6-3.A.3. 6-3.D. Software 6-3.D.1. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of "production facilities" and flow forming machines specified in 6-3.B.1. or 6-3.B.3. 6-3.D.2. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of equipment specified in 6-3.A.1., 6-3.A.2., 6-3.A.4., 6-3.A.5., 6-3.A.6. or 6-3.A.9. 6-3.D.3. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "development" of equipment specified in 6-3.A.2., 6-3.A.3. 6-3.E. Technology 6-3.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment, materials or "software" specified in 6-3.A.1., 6-3.A.2., 6-3.A.3., 6-3.A.4., 6-3.A.5., 6-3.A.6., 6-3.A.9., 6- 3.B., 6-3.C. or 6-3.D. 6-4.B. Test and Production Equipment 6-4.B.1. "Production equipment", and special y designed components therefor, for the "production", handling or acceptance testing of liquid propel ants or propellant constituents specified in 6-4.C. 6-4.B.2. "Production equipment", other than that described in 6-4.B.3., and special y designed components therefor, for the production, handling, mixing, curing, casting, pressing, machining, extruding or acceptance testing of solid propel ants or propel ant constituents specified in 6-4.C. 6-4.B.3. Equipment as fol ows and special y designed components therefor: Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
6-4.B.3.a. Batch mixers with provision for mixing under vacuum in the range of zero to 13.326 kPa and with temperature control capability of the mixing chamber and having al of the fol owing: 1. A total volumetric capacity of 110 litres or more; and
2. At least one mixing/kneading shaft mounted of centre; 6-4.B.3.b. Continuous mixers with provision for mixing under vacuum in the range of zero to 13.326 kPa and with a temperature control capability of the mixing chamber having any of the fol owing: 1. Two or more mixing/kneading shafts; or
2. A single rotating shaft which oscil ates and having kneading teeth/pins on the shaft as wel as inside the casing of the mixing hamber; 6-4.B.3.c. Fluid energy mil s usable for grinding or mil ing substances specified in 6-4.C.; 6-4.B.3.d. Metal powder "production equipment" usable for the "production", in a control ed environment, of spherical or atomised materials specified in 6-4.C.2.c., 6-4.C.2.d. or 6-4.C.2.e.
Note to 6-4.B.3.d.:

6-4.B.3.d. includes: a. Plasma generators (high frequency arc-jet) usable for obtaining sput ered or spherical metal ic powders with organization of the process in an argon-water environment; b. Electroburst equipment usable for obtaining sputtered or spherical metallic powders with organization of the process in an argon-water environment; c. Equipment usable for the "production" of spherical aluminium powders by powdering a melt in an inert medium (e.g. nitrogen).
Notes to 6-4.B.:

1. The only batch mixers, continuous mixers, usable for solid propel ants or propel ants constituents specified in 6- 4.C., and fluid energy mil s specified in 6-4.B., are those specified in 6-4.B.3. 2. Forms of metal powder "production equipment" not specified in 6-4.B.3.d. are to be evaluated in accordance with 1. Monomethyl-hydrazine (MMH) (CAS 60-34-4); 3. Hydrazine mononitrate; 4. Trimethylhydrazine (CAS 1741-01-1); 5. Tetramethylhydrazine (CAS 6415-12-9); 6. N,N dial ylhydrazine; 7. Al ylhydrazine (CAS 7422-78-8); 8. Ethylene dihydrazine; 9. Monomethylhydrazine dinitrate; 10. Unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine nitrate; 11. Hydrazinium azide (CAS 14546-44-2); 12. Dimethylhydrazinium azide; 13. Hydrazinium dinitrate; 14. Di mido oxalic acid dihydrazine (CAS 3457-37-2); 15. 2-hydroxyethylhydrazine nitrate (HEHN); 16. Hydrazinium perchlorate (CAS 27978-54-7); 17. Hydrazinium diperchlorate (CAS 13812-39-0); Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
18. Methylhydrazine nitrate (MHN); 19. Diethylhydrazine nitrate (DEHN); 20. 3,6-dihydrazino tetrazine nitrate (DHTN); 6-4.C.2.c. Spherical size in Canadian controls is dif erent from those of the U.S.: (200 x 10-6 m (200 Im) 6-4.C.2.f. High energy density materials, usable in the systems specified in 6-1.A. or 6-19.A., as fol ows: 1. Mixed fuels that incorporate both solid and liquid fuels, such as boron slurry, having a mass- based energy density of 40 x 106 J/kg or greater; 2. Other high energy density fuels and fuel additives (e.g., cubane, ionic solutions, JP-10) having a volume-based energy density of 37.5 x 109 J/m3 or greater, measured at 20° C and one atmosphere (101.325 kPa) pressure. 6-4.C.4.1. Dinitrogen trioxide (CAS 10544-73-7); 6-4.C.4.a.3. Dinitrogen pentoxide (CAS 10102-03-1); 6-4.C.4.a.4. Mixed Oxides of Nitrogen (MON); 6-4.C.4.a.6. Compounds composed of fluorine and one or more of other halogens, oxygen or nitrogen; 6-4.C.4.b. Oxidiser substances usable in solid propel ant rocket motors as fol ows: 1. Ammonium perchlorate (AP) (CAS 7790-98-9); 2. Ammonium dinitramide (ADN) (CAS 140456-78-6); 3. Nitro-amines (cyclotetramethylene - tetranitramine (HMX) (CAS 2691-41-0); cyclotrimethylene - trinitramine (RDX) (CAS 121-82-4)); 4. Hydrazinium nitroformate (HNF)(CAS 20773-28-8). 6-4.C.5. Polymeric substances, as fol ows: a. Carboxy - terminated polybutadiene (including carboxyl - terminated polybutadiene) (CTPB); b. Hydroxy - terminated polybutadiene (including hydroxyl - terminated polybutadiene) (HTPB); c. Glycidyl azide polymer (GAP); d. Polybutadiene - Acrylic Acid (PBAA); e. Polybutadiene - Acrylic Acid - Acrylonitrile (PBAN); f. Polytetrahydrofuran polyethylene glycol (TPEG). 6-4.C.6.c.1. Carboranes, decaboranes, pentaboranes and derivatives thereof; 6-4.C.6.c.2.: Other propel ant additives and agents as fol ows; Burning rate modifiers as fol ows: : m. Ferrocene Carboxylic acids; n. Butacene (CAS 125856-62-4); o. Other ferrocene derivatives usable as rocket propel ant burning rate modifiers; 6-4.C.6.d.: Esters and plasticisers as follows: Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
1. Triethylene glycol dinitrate (TEGDN) (CAS 111-22-8); 2. Trimethylolethane trinitrate (TMETN) (CAS 3032-55-1); 4. Diethylene glycol dinitrate (DEGDN) (CAS 693-21-0); 5. 4,5 diazidomethyl-2-methyl-1,2,3-triazole (iso- DAMTR); 6. Nitratoethylnitramine (NENA) based plasticisers, as follows: a. Methyl-NENA (CAS 17096-47-8); b. Ethyl-NENA (CAS 85068-73-1); c. Butyl-NENA (CAS 82486-82-6); 7. Dinitropropyl based plasticisers, as follows: a. Bis (2,2-dinitropropyl) acetal (BDNPA) (CAS 5108-69-0); b. Bis (2,2-dinitropropyl) formal (BDNPF) (CAS 5917-61-3); 6-4.C.6.e. Stabilisers as follows: 1. 2-Nitrodiphenylamine (CAS 119-75-5); 6-6. PRODUCTION OF STRUCTURAL COMPOSITES, PYROLYTIC DEPOSITION AND DENSIFICATION, AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS 6-6.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components 6-6.A.1. Composite structures, laminates, and manufactures thereof, special y designed for use in the systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. and the subsystems specified in 6-2.A. or 6-20.A. 6-6.A.2. Resaturated pyrolised (i.e. carbon-carbon) components having al of the fol owing: a. Designed for rocket systems; and
b. Usable in the systems specified in 6-1.A. or 6-19.A.1. 6-6.B. Test and Production Equipment 6-6.B.1. Equipment for the "production" of structural composites, fibres, prepregs or preforms, usable in the systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. as follows, and special y designed components, and accessories therefor: a. Filament winding machines or fibre placement machines, of which the motions for positioning, wrapping and winding fibres can be co-ordinated and programmed in three or more axes, designed to fabricate composite structures or laminates from fibrous or filamentary materials, and co-ordinating and programming b. Tape-laying machines of which the motions for positioning and laying tape and sheets can be co- ordinated and programmed in two or more axes, designed for the manufacture of composite airframes and missile structures; c. Multi-directional, multi-dimensional weaving machines or interlacing machines, including adapters and modification kits for weaving, interlacing or braiding fibres to manufacture composite structures; 6-6.B.1.c. does not control textile machinery not modified for the end-uses stated. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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d. Equipment designed or modified for the production of fibrous or filamentary materials as fol ows: 1. Equipment for converting polymeric fibres (such as polyacrylonitrile, rayon, or polycarbosilane) including special provision to strain the fibre during heating; 2. Equipment for the vapour deposition of elements or compounds on heated filament substrates; 3. Equipment for the wet-spinning of refractory ceramics (such as aluminium oxide); e. Equipment designed or modified for special fibre surface treatment or for producing prepregs and preforms, including rol ers, tension stretchers, coating equipment, cut ing equipment and clicker dies. Examples of components and accessories for the machines specified in 6-6.B.1. are moulds, mandrels, dies, fixtures and tooling for the preform pressing, curing, casting, sintering or bonding of composite structures, laminates and manufactures thereof. 6-6.B.2. Nozzles special y designed for the processes referred to in 6-6.E.3. 6-6.B.3. Isostatic presses having al of the fol owing characteristics: a. Maximum working pressure equal to or greater than 69 MPa; b. Designed to achieve and maintain a control ed thermal environment of 600° C or greater; and
c. Possessing a chamber cavity with an inside diameter of 254 mm or greater. 6-6.B.4. Chemical vapour deposition furnaces designed or modified for the densification of carbon-carbon 6-6.B.5. Equipment and process controls, other than those specified in 6-6.B.3. or 6-6.B.4., designed or modified for densification and pyrolysis of structural composite rocket nozzles and re-entry vehicle nose tips. 6-6.C. Materials 6-6.C.7. Materials for the fabrication of missile components in the systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2, a. Tungsten and al oys in particulate form with a tungsten content of 97% by weight or more and a particle size of 50 x10-6 m (50 Im) or less; b. Molybdenum and alloys in particulate form with a molybdenum content of 97% by weight or more and a particle size of 50 x10-6 m (50 Im) or less; c. Tungsten materials in the solid form having al of the fol owing: 1. Any of the fol owing material compositions: a. Tungsten and al oys containing 97% by weight or more of tungsten; b. Copper infiltrated tungsten containing 80% by weight or more of tungsten; or
c. Silver infiltrated tungsten containing 80% by weight or more of tungsten; and
2. Able to be machined to any of the fol owing products: Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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a. Cylinders having a diameter of 120 mm or greater and a length of 50 mm or greater; b. Tubes having an inner diameter of 65 mm or greater and a wal thickness of 25 mm or greater and a length of 50 mm or greater; or
c. Blocks having a size of 120 mm x 120 mm x 50 mm or greater. 6-6.C.8. Maraging steels having an ultimate tensile strength equal to or greater than 1.5 GPa, measured at 20° C, in the form of sheet, plate or tubing with a wal or plate thickness equal to or less than 5.0 mm usable in systems specified in 6-1.A. or 6-19.A.1.
Technical Note:

Maraging steels are iron alloys general y characterised by high nickel, very low carbon content and use substitutional elements or precipitates to produce strengthening and age-hardening of the al oy. 6-6.C.9. Titanium-stabilized duplex stainless steel (Ti-DSS) usable in the systems specified in 6-1.A. or 6-19.A.1. and having all of the fol owing: a. Having all of the fol owing characteristics: 1. Containing 17.0 - 23.0 weight percent chromium and 4.5 - 7.0 weight percent nickel; 2. Having a titanium content of greater than 0.10 weight percent; and
3. A ferritic-austenitic microstructure (also referred to as a two-phase microstructure) of which at least 10% is austenite by volume (according to ASTM E-1181-87 or national equivalents); and
b. Any of the fol owing forms: 1. Ingots or bars having a size of 100 mm or more in each dimension; 2. Sheets having a width of 600 mm or more and a thickness of 3 mm or less; or
3. Tubes having an outer diameter of 600 mm or more and a wal thickness of 3 mm or less. 6-6.D. Software 6-6.D.1. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of equipment specified in 6-6.B.1. 2. "Software" special y designed or modified for the equipment specified in 6-6.B.3., 6-6.B.4. or 6-6.B.5. 6-6.E. Technology 6-6.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment, materials or "software" specified in 6-6.A., 6-6.B., 6-6.C. or 6-6.D. 6-6.E.2. "Technical data" (including processing conditions) and procedures for the regulation of temperature, pressures or atmosphere in autoclaves or hydroclaves when used for the production of composites or partially processed composites, usable for equipment or materials specified in 6-6.A. or 6-6.C. 6-6.E.3. "Technology" for producing pyrolytical y derived materials formed on a mould, mandrel or other substrate from precursor gases which decompose in the 1,300° C to 2,900° C temperature range at pressures of 130 Pa (1 mm Hg) to 20 kPa (150 mm Hg) including "technology" for the composition of precursor gases, flow-rates, and process control schedules Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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6-9.A.3. Linear accelerometers, designed for use in inertial navigation systems or in guidance systems of al types, usable in the systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2., having al of the fol owing characteristics, and special y designed components therefor: a. ‘Scale factor' ‘repeatability' less (bet er) than 1250 ppm; and
b. ‘Bias' ‘repeatability' less (bet er) than 1250 micro g. 6-9.A.5. Accelerometers or gyros of any type, designed for use in inertial navigation systems or in guidance systems of al types, specified to function at acceleration levels greater than 100 g, and special y designed components 6-9.A.7. ‘Integrated navigation systems', designed or modified for the systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6- 19.A.2. and capable of providing a navigational accuracy of 200 m CEP or less. 6-9.A.8. Three axis magnetic heading sensors having al of the fol owing characteristics, and special y designed components therefor: a. Internal tilt compensation in pitch (+/-90 degrees) and rol (+/-180 degrees) axes; b. Capable of providing azimuthal accuracy bet er (less) than 0.5 degrees rms at latitudes of +/-80 degrees, referenced to local magnetic field; and
c. Designed or modified to be integrated with flight control and navigation systems. Test and Production Equipment 6-9.B.1. "Production equipment", and other test, calibration and alignment equipment, other than that described in 6- 9.B.2., designed or modified to be used with equipment specified in 6-9.A.
Note for 6-9.B.:

Equipment specified in 6-9.B.1. includes the fol owing: a. For laser gyro equipment, the fol owing equipment used to characterise mirrors, having the threshold accuracy shown or bet er: 1. Scat erometer (10 ppm); 2. Reflectometer (50 ppm); 3. Profilometer (5 Angstroms); b. For other inertial equipment: 1. Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) Module Tester; 2. IMU Platform Tester; 3. IMU Stable Element Handling Fixture; 4. IMU Platform Balance Fixture; 5. Gyro Tuning Test Station; 6. Gyro Dynamic Balance Station; 7. Gyro Run-In/Motor Test Station; 8. Gyro Evacuation and Fil ing Station; 9. Centrifuge Fixture for Gyro Bearings; 10. Accelerometer Axis Align Station; 11. Accelerometer Test Station. 6-9.B.2. Equipment as fol ows: Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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6-9.B.2. a. Balancing machines having al the following characteristics: 1. Not capable of balancing rotors/assemblies having a mass greater than 3 kg; 2. Capable of balancing rotors/assemblies at speeds greater than 12,500 rpm; 3. Capable of correcting unbalance in two planes or more; and
4. Capable of balancing to a residual specific unbalance of 0.2 g mm per kg of rotor mass; 6-9.B.2. b. Indicator heads (sometimes known as balancing instrumentation) designed or modified for use with machines specified in 6-9.B.2.a.; 6-9.B.2. c. Motion simulators/rate tables (equipment capable of simulating motion) having al of the fol owing characteristics: 1. Two axes or more; 2. Designed or modified to incorporate sliprings or integrated non-contact devices capable of transferring electrical power, signal information, or both; and
3. Having any of the following characteristics: a. For any single axis having al of the fol owing: 1. Capable of rates of 400 degrees/s or more, or 30 degrees/s or less; and
2. A rate resolution equal to or less than 6 degrees/s and an accuracy equal to or less than 0.6 degrees/s; b. Having a worst-case rate stability equal to or bet er (less) than plus or minus 0.05% averaged over 10 degrees or more; or
c. A positioning "accuracy" equal to or less (better) than 5 arc second; d. Positioning tables (equipment capable of precise rotary positioning in any axes) having the following characteristics: 1. Two axes or more; and
2. A positioning "accuracy" equal to or less (bet er) than 5 arc second; e. Centrifuges capable of imparting accelerations above 100 g and designed or modified to incorporate sliprings or integrated non-contact devices capable of transferring electrical power, signal information, or both.
Notes to 6-9.B:

1. The only balancing machines, indicator heads, motion simulators, rate tables, positioning tables and centrifuges specified in Item 6-9. are those specified in 6-9.B.2. 2. 6-9.B.2.a. does not control balancing machines designed or modified for dental or other medical equipment. 3. 6-9.B.2.c. and 6-9.B.2.d. do not control rotary tables designed or modified for machine tools or for medical Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
4. Rate tables not control ed by 6-9.B.2.c. and providing the characteristics of a positioning table are to be evaluated according to 6-9.B.2.d. 5. Equipment that has the characteristics specified in 6-9.B.2.d. which also meets the characteristics of 6-9.B.2.c. wil be treated as equipment specified in 6-9.B.2.c. 6. Item 6-9.B.2.c. applies whether or not sliprings or integrated non-contact devices are fit ed at the time of export. 7. Item 6-9.B.2.e. applies whether or not sliprings or integrated non-contact devices are fit ed at the time of export. 6-9.D.1. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of equipment specified in 6-9.A. or 6-9.B. 6-9.D.2. Integration "software" for the equipment specified in 6-9.A.1. 6-9.D.3. Integration "software" special y designed for the equipment specified in 6-9.A.6. 6-9.D.4. Integration "software", designed or modified for the ‘integrated navigation systems' specified in 6-9.A.7. A common form of integration "software" employs Kalman filtering. 6-9.E. Technology 6-9.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment or "software" specified in 6-9.A., 6-9.B. or 6-9.D. Governments may permit the export of equipment or "software" specified in 6-9.A. or 6-9.D. as part of a manned aircraft, satel ite, land vehicle, marine/submarine vessel or geophysical survey equipment or in quantities appropriate for replacement parts for such applications. 6-10.A.3. Flight control servo valves designed or modified for the systems in 6-10.A.1. or 6-10.A.2., and designed or modified to operate in a vibration environment greater than 10 g rms between 20 Hz and 2 kHz. Governments may permit the export of systems, equipment or valves specified in 6-10.A. as part of a manned aircraft or satel ite or in quantities appropriate for replacement parts for manned aircraft. 6-10.B. Test and Production Equipment 6-10.B.1. Test, calibration, and alignment equipment specially designed for equipment specified in 6-10.A. 6-10.D. Software 6-10.D.1. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of equipment specified in 6-10.A. or 6-10.B. Governments may permit the export of "software" specified in 6-10.D.1. as part of a manned aircraft or satel ite or in quantities appropriate for replacement parts for manned aircraft. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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6-10.D.3. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment or "software" specified in 6-10.A., 6-10.B. or 6-10.D. 6-11.A.3. Receiving equipment for Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS); e.g., GPS, GLONASS or Galileo), having any of the fol owing characteristics, and special y designed components a. Designed or modified for use in systems specified in 6-1.A.; or
b. Designed or modified for airborne applications and having any of the fol owing: 1. Capable of providing navigation information at speeds in excess of 600 m/s; 2. Employing decryption, designed or modified for military or governmental services, to gain access to GNSS secure signal/data; or
3. Being special y designed to employ anti-jam features (e.g. nul steering antenna or electronical y steerable antenna) to function in an environment of active or passive countermeasures. Notes to 6-11.A.3.b.2 & 3:
6-11.A.3.b.2. and 6-11.A.3.b.3. do not control equipment designed for commercial, civil or ‘Safety of Life' (e.g. data integrity, flight safety) GNSS services. 6-11.A.4. Electronic assemblies and components, designed or modified for use in the systems specified in 6-1.A. or 6-19.A. and special y designed for military use and operation at temperatures in excess of 125° C. 6-11.D. Software 6-11.D.1. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of equipment specified in 6-11.A.1., 6-11.A.2. or 6- 6-11.D.2. "Software" special y designed for the "use" of equipment specified in 6-11.A.3. 6-11.E. Technology 6-11.E.1. Design "technology" for protection of avionics and electrical subsystems against Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) and Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) hazards from external sources, as follows: a. Design "technology" for shielding systems; b. Design "technology" for the configuration of hardened electrical circuits and subsystems; c. Design "technology" for determination of hardening criteria for the above. 6-11.E.2. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment or "software" specified in 6-11.A. or 6-11.D. 6-12.A.3. Gravity meters (gravimeters), gravity gradiometers, and special y designed components therefor, designed or modified for airborne or marine use, and having a static or operational accuracy of 7 x 10-6 m/s2 (0.7 mil igal) or bet er, with a time to steady-state registration of two minutes or less, usable for systems specified in 6-1.A. 6-12.A.6. Thermal batteries designed or modified for the systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. Item 6-12.A.6. does not control thermal bat eries special y designed for rocket systems or unmanned aerial vehicles that are not capable of a "range" equal to or greater than 300 km. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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Technical Note to 6-12:
Thermal bat eries are single use bat eries that contain a solid non-conducting inorganic salt as the electrolyte. These bat eries incorporate a pyrolytic material that, when ignited, melts the electrolyte and activates the bat ery. 6-12.D. Software 6-12.D.1. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of equipment specified in 6-12.A.1. 6-12.D.3. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of equipment specified in 6-12.A.4. or 6-12.A.5., usable for systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. 6-12.E. Technology 6-12.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment or "software" specified in 6-12.A. or 6-12.D. 6-13.E. Technology 6-13.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment specified in 6-13.A. 6-14.E. Technology 6-14.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment specified in 6-14.A. 6-15. TEST FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT 6-15.B. Test and Production Equipment 6-15.B.1. Vibration test equipment, usable for the systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. or the subsystems specified in 6-2.A. or 6-20.A., and components therefor, as fol ows: a. Vibration test systems employing feedback or closed loop techniques and incorporating a digital controller, capable of vibrating a system at an acceleration equal to or greater than 10 g rms between 20 Hz and 2 kHz while imparting forces equal to or greater than 50 kN, measured ‘bare table'; b. Digital control ers, combined with special y designed vibration test "software", with a ‘real-time control bandwidth' greater than 5 kHz and designed for use with vibration test systems specified in 6-15.B.1.a.;
Technical Note:

‘Real-time control bandwidth' is defined as the maximum rate at which a controller can execute complete cycles of sampling, processing data and transmit ing control signals. c. Vibration thrusters (shaker units), with or without associated amplifiers, capable of imparting a force equal to or greater than 50 kN, measured ‘bare table', and usable in vibration test systems specified in 6-15.B.1.a.; d. Test piece support structures and electronic units designed to combine multiple shaker units into a complete shaker system capable of providing an ef ective combined force equal to or greater than 50 kN, measured ‘bare table', and usable in vibration test systems specified in 6-15.B.1.a. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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Technical Note:
Vibration test systems incorporating a digital controller are those systems, the functions of which are, partly or entirely, automatical y control ed by stored and digital y coded electrical signals. 6-15.B.2. Wind-tunnels for speeds of Mach 0.9 or more, usable for the systems specified in 6-1.A. or 6-19.A. or the subsystems specified in 6-2.A. or 6-20.A. 6-15.B.3. Test benches/stands, usable for the systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. or the subsystems specified in 6-2.A. or 6-20.A., which have the capacity to handle solid or liquid propel ant rockets, motors or engines having a thrust greater than 68 kN, or which are capable of simultaneously measuring the three axial thrust 6-15.B.4. Environmental chambers as fol ows, usable for the systems specified in 6-1.A. or 6-19.A. or the subsystems specified in 6-2.A. or 6-20.A.: a. Environmental chambers capable of simulating al of the fol owing flight conditions: 1. Having any of the following: a. Altitude equal to or greater than 15 km; or
b. Temperature range from below –50º C to above +125º C; and
2. Incorporating, or designed or modified to incorporate, a shaker unit or other vibration test equipment to produce vibration environments equal to or greater than 10 g rms, measured ‘bare table', between 20 Hz and 2 kHz imparting forces equal to or greater than 5 kN;
Technical Notes:

1. Item 6-15.B.4.a.2. describes systems that are capable of generating a vibration environment with a single wave (e.g. a sine wave) and systems capable of generating a broad band random vibration (i.e. power spectrum). 2. In Item 6-15.B.4.a.2., designed or modified means the environmental chamber provides appropriate interfaces (e.g. sealing devices) to incorporate a shaker unit or other vibration test equipment as specified in this Item. b. Environmental chambers capable of simulating al of the fol owing flight conditions: 1. Acoustic environments at an overal sound pressure level of 140 dB or greater (referenced to 2 x 10-5 N/m2) or with a total rated acoustic power output of 4 kW or greater; and
2. Any of the fol owing: a. Altitude equal to or greater than 15 km; or
b. Temperature range from below -50° C to above +125° C. 5. Accelerators capable of delivering electromagnetic radiation produced by bremsstrahlung from accelerated electrons of 2 MeV or greater, and equipment containing those accelerators, usable for the systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. or the subsystems specified in 6- 6-15.B.5. does not control equipment special y designed for medical purposes. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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Technical Note:
In Item 6-15.B. ‘bare table' means a flat table, or surface, with no fixture or fit ings. 6-15.D. Software 6-15.D.1. "Software" special y designed or modified for the "use" of equipment specified in 6-15.B. usable for testing systems specified in 6-1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. or subsystems specified in 6-2.A. or 6-20.A. 6-15.E. Technology 6-15.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment or "software" specified in 6-15.B. or 6-15.D. This control only applies when the equipment is supplied with "software" specified in 6-16.D.1. 6-16.D. Software 6-16.D.1. "Software" special y designed for model ing, simulation, or design integration of the systems specified in 6- 1.A. or the subsystems specified in 6-2.A. or 6- 20.A. 6-16.E. Technology 6-16.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment or "software" specified in 6-16.A. or 6-16.D. 6-17.B. Test and Production Equipment 6-17.B.1. Systems, special y designed for radar cross section measurement, usable for the systems specified in 6- 1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. or the subsystems specified in 6-2.A. 6-17.D. Software 6-17.D.1. "Software" special y designed for reduced observables such as radar reflectivity, ultraviolet/infrared signatures and acoustic signatures (i.e. stealth technology), for applications usable for the systems specified in 6-1.A. or 6- 19.A. or the subsystems specified in 6-2.A. 6-17.D.1. includes "software" special y designed for analysis of signature reduction. 6-17.E. Technology 6-17.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment, materials or "software" specified in 6-17.A., 6-17.B., 6-17.C. or 6-17.D. 6-17.E.1. includes databases special y designed for analysis of signature reduction. 6-18.E. Technology 6-18.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment specified in 6-18.A. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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6-19. OTHER COMPLETE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 6-19.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components 6-19.A.1. Complete rocket systems (including bal istic missile systems, space launch vehicles, and sounding rockets), not specified in 6-1.A.1., capable of a "range" equal to or greater than 300 km. 6-19.A.2. Complete unmanned aerial vehicle systems (including cruise missile systems, target drones and reconnaissance drones), not specified in 6-1.A.2., capable of a "range" equal to or greater than 300 km. 6-19.A.3. Complete unmanned aerial vehicle systems, not specified in 6-1.A.2. or 6-19.A.2., having al of the a. Having any of the following: 1. An autonomous flight control and navigation capability; or
2. Capability of control ed flight out of the direct vision range involving a human operator; and
b. Having any of the following: 1. Incorporating an aerosol dispensing system/mechanism with a capacity greater than 20 litres; or
2. Designed or modified to incorporate an aerosol dispensing system/mechanism with a capacity greater than 20 litres. Item 6-19.A.3. does not control model aircraft, special y designed for recreational or competition purposes.
Technical Notes:

1. An aerosol consists of particulate or liquids other than fuel components, by-products or additives, as part of the "payload" to be dispersed in the atmosphere. Examples of aerosols include pesticides for crop dusting and dry chemicals for cloud seeding. 2. An aerosol dispensing system/mechanism contains all those devices (mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, etc.), which are necessary for storage and dispersion of an aerosol into the atmosphere. This includes the possibility of aerosol the combustion exhaust vapour and into the propel er slip stream. 6-19.D. Software 6-19.D.1. "Software" which coordinates the function of more than one subsystem, special y designed or modified for "use" in the systems specified in 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. 6-19.E. Technology 6-19.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment specified in 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2. 6-20. OTHER COMPLETE SUBSYSTEMS 6-20.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components 6-20.A.1. Complete subsystems as fol ows: Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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a. Individual rocket stages, not specified in 6-2.A.1., usable in systems specified in 6-19.A.; b. Solid propel ant rocket motors or liquid propel ant rocket engines, not specified in 6-2.A.1., usable in systems specified in 6-19.A., having a total impulse capacity equal to or greater than 8.41 x 105 Ns, but less than 1.1 x 106 Ns. 6-20.B. Test and Production Equipment 6-20.B.1. "Production facilities" specially designed for the subsystems specified in 6-20.A. 6-20.B.2. "Production equipment" special y designed for the subsystems specified in 6-20.A. 6-20.D. Software 6-20.D.1. "Software" special y designed or modified for the systems specified in 6-20.B.1. 6-20.D.2. "Software", not specified in 6-2.D.2., special y designed or modified for the "use" of rocket motors or engines specified in 6-20.A.1.b. 6-20.E. Technology 6-20.E.1. "Technology", in accordance with the General Technology Note, for the "development", "production" or "use" of equipment or "software" specified in 6-20.A., 6-20.B. or 6-20. D. 2-17. b. Construction equipment specially designed for military use; 2-17.c. Fit ings, coatings and treatments, for signature suppression, specially designed for military use; 2-17.d. Field engineer equipment specially designed for use in a combat zone; 2-17.e. "Robots", "robot" controllers and "robot" "end-effectors", having any of the fol owing characteristics: 1. Specially designed for military use; 2. Incorporating means of protecting hydraulic lines against external y induced punctures caused by ballistic fragments (e.g., incorporating self-sealing lines) and designed to use hydraulic fluids with flash points higher than 839 K (566° C); or
3. Special y designed or rated for operating in an electro-magnetic pulse (EMP) environment; 2-17.f. ‘Libraries' (parametric technical databases) special y designed for military use with equipment specified by the 2-17. g. Nuclear power generating equipment or propulsion equipment, including "nuclear reactors", special y designed for military use and components therefor specially designed or ‘modified' for military use;
2-17.k. Field generators special y designed or ‘modified' for military use;
2-17.l. Containers special y designed or ‘modified' for military use; 2-17.n. Test models specially designed for the "development" of items specified by 2-4., 2-6., 2-9. or 2-10.; Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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2-17.p. "Fuel cells", other than those specified elsewhere in the Munitions List, specially designed or ‘modified' for 5504.2.a.i./1-7.A.5. Global Navigation Satel ite Systems (GNSS) receiving equipment having any of the following and specially designed components therefor: 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.5. Liquid rocket propulsion systems containing any of the systems or components, specified by 1-9.A.6. 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.6. Systems and components, special y designed for liquid rocket propulsion systems, as fol ows: 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.6.a. Cryogenic refrigerators, flightweight dewars, cryogenic heat pipes or cryogenic systems, specially designed for use in space vehicles and capable of restricting cryogenic fluid losses to less than 30% per year; 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.6.b. Cryogenic containers or closed-cycle refrigeration systems, capable of providing temperatures of 100 K (-173° C) or less for "aircraft" capable of sustained flight at speeds exceeding Mach 3, launch vehicles or 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.6.c. Slush hydrogen storage or transfer systems; 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.6.d. High pressure (exceeding 17.5 MPa) turbo pumps, pump components or their associated gas generator or expander cycle turbine drive systems; 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.6.e. High-pressure (exceeding 10.6 MPa) thrust chambers and nozzles therefor; 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.6.f. Propel ant storage systems using the principle of capil ary containment or positive expulsion (i.e., with flexible bladders); 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.6.g. Liquid propellant injectors with individual orifices of 0.381 mm or smaller in diameter (an area of 1.14 x 10-3 cm2 or smaller for non-circular orifices) and specially designed for liquid rocket engines; 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.6.h. One-piece carbon-carbon thrust chambers or one-piece carbon-carbon exit cones, with densities exceeding 1.4 g/cm3 and tensile strengths exceeding 48 MPa. 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.7.a. Total impulse capacity exceeding 1.1 MNs; 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.7.b. Specific impulse of 2.4 kNs/kg or more, when the nozzle flow is expanded to ambient sea level conditions for an adjusted chamber pressure of 7 MPa; 5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.7.c. Stage mass fractions exceeding 88% and propellant solid loadings exceeding 86%;
5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.7.d. Components specified by 1-9.A.8.; or
5504.2.a.i ./1-9.A.8.b. Filament-wound "composite" motor cases exceeding 0.61 m in diameter or having ‘structural efficiency ratios (PV/W)' exceeding 25 km; 5504.2.d. payloads special y designed or modified for "spacecraft", and specially designed components therefor not controlled elsewhere by Group 1 of the Guide; 5504.2.f. chemiluminescent compounds special y designed or modified for military use, and specially designed components therefor; NB: While it appears that most Schedule articles are interpreted in the same way by al countries that subscribe to
similar lists, there are instances when other countries, including Canada, wil make interpretations that are inconsistent with the general understanding. This paper does not at empt to correct situations that fal into this general category. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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Recommendation 2: Mid-Term:
It is recommended that once the changes to the USML occur that PWGSC make changes to the
Schedule based on Annex B. Annex B identifies those goods and technology that the U.S.
Government is proposing be removed from the USML because they consider them no longer
relevant to the ITAR or the USML.

The U.S. is proposing a major overhaul to its export control system pursuant to President Obama s Export Control
Reform Initiative (ECRI). Part of this overhaul cal s for the removal of a broad range of goods and technology from the US Munitions List (USML) under the International Traf ic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) to the Commerce Control List (CCL) under the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). Subsection 1 of this Annex general y describes
goods and technology that are currently contained in the USML, and therefore are included in the Schedule of "control ed goods", but which are proposed for removal from the USML. Subsection 2 identifies goods and
technology that the U.S. government proposes remain on the USML and which are currently on the Schedule of "control ed goods". While the ultimate objective of ECRI is to create one U.S. export control system by amalgamating the ITAR and EAR, the initial step is to move certain non-critical items from the current USML to the CCL. The review of the USML and the identification of articles and data to be moved from the USML to the CCL was to be completed by mid-2012 (it may not occur now until after the November election). The U.S. review is aimed at creating a revised USML that specifical y describes what is controlled using objective criteria rather than broad, open-ended, subjective, or design intent-based criteria which have historically been dif icult for industry and government to apply consistently. The fact that an item is used by the military does not, in and of itself, make that item a military item or even an important or strategic item. Under the proposed changes, only specific types of items would be USML listed. Al other items would become subject to the EAR. However, should certain articles and data be removed from the USML they should, practical y speaking, be removed from the ‘Schedule', as wel . One of the most critical and significant changes proposed under ECRI is the general removal of USML controls on MOST generic parts, components, accessories, and attachments that are in any way specifical y designed or
modified for a defence article. Rather, these changes are directed at establishing positive and specific lists of types of parts, components, accessories, and at achments that continue to warrant control on the USML. This means that al other parts, components, accessories, and at achments which are currently subject to USML/ITAR controls, and are currently reflected in Canada's Schedule of "control ed goods" wil become subject to the EAR. As a general
comment, Canada has traditional y been a major supplier of parts and components to the defence industry in Canada and abroad and in particular, the U.S. Any changes to the USML, fol owed by equivalent changes to the Schedule, wil be of significant benefit to Canadian industry. Subsection 1: Proposed USML Changes (General) and Potential Canadian Impact:
If the proposed changes under ECRI come to fruition, many items currently listed in the USML wil fal of of the USML and into the CCL. The following summarises the items that are being proposed for removal from the USML and the potential impact on Canadian industry. 1. Explosives and other energetic materials (USML Category V) that have broad commercial application would no longer fal under the USML. As a significant manufacturer of explosive materials for the mining, removing such items from the USML and ultimately the ‘Schedule' would reduce the number of Canadian companies subject to the CGP. 2. General parts and components for surface vessels of war and other special naval equipment (USML Category VI) wil no longer be subject to the USML unless specifical y identified in the USML. Canadian Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
industry provides a broad range of parts and components for surface vessels given our long history of vessel manufacturing (frigates) and our current shipbuilding projects. Under the USML proposal only specific, critical parts and components wil be subject to USML controls and if Canada were to change its ‘Schedule' a great number of Canadian companies would no longer be subject to the CGP. 3. Submersible and semi-submersible vessels (USML Category XX) wil be control ed only if they meet certain criteria listed in Category XX. Canada has a smal but significant submersible industry that would likely no longer be subject to CGP requirements. 4. Gas turbine engines and associated equipment (USML Category XIX) is a new Category designed to cover gas turbine engines for land, air and sea vehicles and vessels. As a significant country involved in the RDP of gas turbine engines any elimination of USML controls and ultimately CGP controls wil result in eliminating constraints on a broad range of manufacturers of engines, parts and components and probably reduce the number of CGP registrants. Turboshaft or turboprop engines, including their parts and components, wil only be control ed under the USML if specifical y identified in the USML. Al others wil be covered under the CCL. These U.S. changes would warrant an equivalent change to the CGP ‘Schedule'. 5. Ground vehicles (USML Category VI ) are also subject to major changes. Unless the vehicle or its parts and components are specifical y identified in Category VI they wil be control ed under the CCL. An equivalent change to the ‘Schedule' wil significantly reduce the number of suppliers of parts and components for the Light Armoured Vehicles (LAV) manufactured by General Dynamics because most of the parts and components currently subject to controls under the ‘Schedule' wil no longer fal under the CGP. Also, companies like Navistar would no longer be subject to the CGP because most of its military vehicles would not be listed in the USML and therefore would be candidates for removal from the CGP ‘Schedule'. 6. Aircraft and related articles (USML Category VI I) are also areas in which Canadian industry excels. Unless the specific article or part/component is listed in Category VI I they wil fal under the CCL. Since Canada is a major supplier of aircraft parts and components many companies that are currently subject to the CGP would no longer be required to be CGP registered once the ‘Schedule' is amended to reflect the USML 7. A wide range of fire control, range finder, optical and guidance and control equipment, much of which is manufactured by Canadian industry, wil see major changes if Category XI of the USML is amended to move many of the Category XI goods and technology to the CCL of the EAR. Canadian industry has traditional y been at the forefront of many of these technologies. 8. A broad range of auxiliary and miscel aneous equipment (Category XI I) is proposed for removal from the USML. Items like certain cameras and specialised processing equipment, photo-interpretation, stereoscopic plot ing, and photogrammetry equipment for military purposes, as wel as components and parts, are proposed for removal from the USML to the CCL. Canadian industry has traditional y been at the forefront of many of these technologies. 9. A broad range of personal protective equipment and shelters, including a broad range of parts and components currently control ed under the USML, are proposed for transfer to the CCL. For example, body armour which meets or exceeds NIJ Standard-0101.06 Type IV would remain under the USML whereas Type II body armour would be controlled on the CCL. As wel , anti-gravity suits, pressure suits, and atmosphere diving suits, as wel as permanent and transportable shelters, currently control ed under the USML, would be control ed under the CCL. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program


Subsection 2: Proposed USML Changes (Specific):


USML Category VI—Surface Vessels of War and Special Naval Equipment

The revised list of articles under USML Category VI includes the following: *(a) Warships and other combatant vessels (see ITAR Part 121.15 for list of vessel types). (b) Other vessels not control ed in paragraph (a) of this section (see ITAR Part 121.15). (c) Developmental vessels and ‘‘special y designed' parts, components, accessories, and at achments therefor, developed under a contract with the U.S. Department of Defence. *(e) Naval nuclear propulsion plants, their land prototypes, and special facilities for their construction, support, and maintenance (see ITAR Part 123.20). (f) Vessel and naval equipment components, parts, accessories, at achments, and associated equipment, as fol ows: (1) hulls or superstructures ‘ special y designed' for any vessels control ed in paragraph (a) of this section; (2) hulls or superstructures having armour, active protection systems, or developmental armour systems; (3) hulls or superstructures designed to survive 12.5% or greater damage across the length as measured between perpendiculars; (4) propulsion and supporting auxiliary, control, and monitoring systems that store, create, distribute, conserve, transfer, and use energy outside propulsion system boundaries exceeding 30MJ storage, discharge less than 3 seconds and cycle time under 45 seconds, and parts and components ‘‘special y designed' therefor; (5) shipborne auxiliary systems for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) compartmentalization, over-pressurization and filtration systems, and parts and components ‘‘special y designed' therefor; *(6) control and monitoring systems for autonomous unmanned vessels capable of on-board, autonomous perception and decision-making necessary for the vessel to navigate while avoiding fixed and moving hazards, and obeying rules-of-the-road without human intervention; *(7) any machinery, device, component, or equipment specifically developed, designed, or modified for use in plants or facilities control ed in paragraph (e) of this section (see§ 123.20 of this subchapter); (8) components, parts, accessories, at achments, and equipment ‘‘special y designed' for integration of articles control ed by Categories II, IV, or XVI I or catapults for launching aircraft or arresting gear for recovering (9) shipborne active protection systems (i.e., defensive systems that actively detect and track incoming threats and launch a bal istic, explosive, energy, or electromagnetic countermeasure(s) to neutralize the threat prior to contact with a vessel) and parts and components ‘ special y designed' therefor; (10) minesweeping and mine hunting equipment (including mine countermeasures equipment deployed by aircraft) and parts and components ‘‘special y designed' therefor; or *(11) any component, part, accessory, at achment, equipment, or system that: (i) is classified; (ii) contains classified software; (i i) is manufactured using classified production data; or (iv) is being developed using classified information. (g) Technical data (as defined in ITAR Part 120.10) and defence services (as defined in 120.9 of this subchapter) directly related to the defence articles enumerated in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this category.
Note to Category VI, paragraph (a):


Vessels ‘‘special y designed' for military use but not identified in (a) above, are subject to the EAR.

Note to Category VI, paragraph (f):

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Parts, components, accessories, and at achments ‘‘special y designed'' for vessels enumerated in this category but not listed in Category VI(f) are subject to the EAR.
Category VI - Ground Vehicles

This proposed rule revises USML Category VI , Ground Vehicles. The proposed revision narrows the types of ground
vehicle controlled on the USML to only those that warrant control under the stringent requirements of the Arms Export Control Act. Changes include the removal of most unarmoured and unarmed military vehicles, trucks, trailers, and trains (unless ‘‘special y designed' as firing platforms for weapons above .50 caliber), and armoured vehicles (either unarmed or with inoperable weapons) before 1956. This Category includes the fol owing: *(a) Armoured combat ground vehicles (see ITAR Part 121.4) as fol ows: (2) infantry fighting vehicles. *(b) Ground vehicles (not enumerated in paragraph (a) of this category) and trailers that are armed or are ‘‘special y designed' to serve as a firing or launch platform (see ITAR Part 121.4). (c) Ground vehicles and trailers equipped with any mission systems control ed under this subchapter (see § 121.4 of this subchapter). *(e) Armoured support ground vehicles (see ITAR Part 121.4). *(f) [Reserved—for articles formerly control ed under this paragraph see Category XIX and ECCN 0A606.] (g) Ground vehicle components, parts, accessories, at achments, and associated equipment as fol ows: (1) armoured hul s, armoured turrets, and turret rings; (2) active protection systems (i.e., defensive systems that actively detect and track incoming threats and launch a bal istic, explosive, energy, or electromagnetic countermeasure(s) to neutralize the threat prior to contact with a vehicle) and parts and components ‘‘special y designed' therefor; (3) composite armour parts and components ‘‘special y designed'' for the vehicles in this category; (4) spaced armour components and parts, including slat armour components and parts ‘‘special y designed' for the vehicles in this category; (5) reactive armour parts and components; (6) electromagnetic armour parts and components, including pulsed power parts and components ‘ special y designed' therefor; (7) built in test equipment (BITE) to evaluate the condition of weapons or other mission systems for vehicles identified in this Category. This does not include BITE that provides diagnostics solely for a subsystem or component for the basic operation of the vehicle. (8) gun mount, stabilization, turret drive, and automatic elevating systems, and parts and components ‘‘specially designed'' therefor; (9) self-launching bridge components rated class 60 or above for deployment by vehicles enumerated in this (10) suspension components as fol ows: (i) rotary shock absorbers ‘‘special y designed' for vehicles weighing more than 30 tons in this (i ) torsion bars ‘‘special y designed' for the vehicles weighing more than 50 tons in this category; (11) kits ‘‘specially designed' to convert a vehicle enumerated in this category into either an unmanned or a driver-optional vehicle. For a kit to be control ed by this paragraph, it must, at a minimum, include equipment (i) remote or autonomous steering; Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
(i ) acceleration and braking; and (iii) a control system; (12) fire control computers, mission computers, vehicle management computers, integrated core processers, stores management systems, armaments control processors, vehicle-weapon interface units and computers; (13) test or calibration equipment for the mission systems of the vehicles control ed in this category, except those enumerated elsewhere; or *(14) any component, part, accessory, at achment, equipment, or system that: (i) is classified; (ii) contains classified software; (iii) is manufactured using classified production data; or (iv) is being developed using classified information.
Note:
Parts, components, accessories, and at achments ‘ special y designed' for vehicles enumerated in this
category but not listed in Category VI (g) are subject to the EAR under ECCN 0A606. (h) Technical data (as defined in ITAR Part 120.10) and defence services (as defined in ITAR Part 120.9) directly related to the defence articles enumerated in paragraphs (a) through (g) of this category (see ITAR Part 125.4 for
Ground vehicles identified in ITAR Part 121.4.
(a) In Category VI , ‘‘Ground Vehicles' means developmental, production, or inventory ground vehicles, whether manned or unmanned, that: (1) are armed or are ‘ special y designed' to be used as a platform to deliver munitions or otherwise destroy or incapacitate targets (e.g., firing lasers, launching rockets, firing missiles, firing mortars, firing artillery rounds, or firing other ammunition greater than .50 caliber); (2) are armoured support vehicles capable of of -road or amphibious use ‘‘special y designed' to transport or deploy personnel or materiel, or to move with other vehicles over land in close support of combat vehicles or troops (e.g., personnel carriers, resupply vehicles, combat engineer vehicles, recovery vehicles, reconnaissance vehicles, bridge launching vehicles, ambulances, and command and control vehicles); or (3) incorporate any ‘‘mission systems' control ed under this subchapter. Note: ‘ Mission systems' are defined as ‘‘systems' (see § 121.8(g) of this subchapter) that are defence articles that
perform specific military functions, such as by providing military communication, target designation, surveil ance, target detection, or sensor capabilities.
Note:
‘ Armoured' ground vehicles, for purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, (i) are ground vehicles that have
integrated, ful y armoured hulls or cabs, or (i ) are ground vehicles on which add-on armour has been instal ed to provide bal istic protection to level II (National Institute of Justice Standard 0108.01, September 1985) or better.
Note: ‘ Armoured' vehicles do not include those that are merely capable of being equipped with add-on armour.

Note: (b) Ground Vehicles ‘‘special y designed'' for military applications that are not identified in (a) of this section are
subject to the EAR under ECCN 0A606, including any unarmed ground vehicles, regardless of origin or designation, manufactured prior to 1956 and unmodified since 1955. Modifications made to incorporate safety features required by law, are cosmetic (e.g. dif erent paint, repositioning of bolt holes), or that add parts or components otherwise available prior to 1956 are considered ‘‘unmodified' for the purposes of this subparagraph. ECCN 0A606 also includes unarmed vehicles derived from otherwise EAR99 civilian vehicles that have been modified or otherwise fit ed with materials to provide bal istic protection, including protection to level II (National Institute of Justice Standard 0108.01, September 1985) or bet er and that do not have reactive or electromagnetic armour. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program


Category VI I - Aircraft and Related Articles

The objective is to revise Category VI I of the USML to describe more precisely the military aircraft and related defence articles warranting control on the USML. While many of the aircraft control ed in paragraph (a) of Category VI I are defined based on objective parameters, some are not. For example, unmanned aerial vehicles controlled
under (a)(6) are simply described as ‘ military.' This is to dif erentiate those unmanned aerial vehicles currently controlled under Category VI I from those currently controlled, and wil remain so controlled, under the EAR
(ECCN 9A012).
The articles proposed in Category VI I include the fol owing: (a) Aircraft (see ITAR Part 121.3) as follows: *(2) Fighters, fighter bombers, and fixed-wing at ack aircraft; *(3) Jet-powered trainers used to train pilots for fighter, at ack, or bomber aircraft; *(4) At ack helicopters; *(5) Unarmed military unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs); *(6) Armed unmanned aerial vehicles; *(7) Military intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance aircraft; *(8) Electronic warfare, airborne warning and control aircraft; (9) Air refueling aircraft and Strategic airlift aircraft; (10) Target drones; (11) Aircraft equipped with any mission systems control ed under this subchapter; or (12) Aircraft capable of being refueled in flight including hover-in-flight refueling (HIFR). (d) Launching and recovery equipment ‘‘special y designed' for defence articles described in paragraph (a) of this (f) Developmental aircraft and ‘ special y designed' parts, components, accessories, and at achments therefor developed under a contract with the U.S. Department of Defence. (h) Aircraft components, parts, accessories, at achments, and associated equipment as fol ows: (1) Components, parts, accessories, at achments, and equipment ‘‘special y designed' for the fol owing U.S.-origin aircraft: B–1B, B–2, F–15SE, F/A18E/F/G, F–22, F–35 (and variants thereof), F–117, or United States Government technology demonstrators.
Components, parts, accessories, attachments, and equipment of the F–15SE, and F/A–18 E/F/G that are

common to earlier models of these aircraft, unless listed below, are subject to the jurisdiction of the EAR;
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(2) Face gear gearboxes, split-torque gearboxes, variable speed gearboxes, synchronization shafts, interconnecting drive shafts, and gearboxes with internal pitch line velocities exceeding 15,000 feet per minute and parts and components ‘‘special y designed' therefor; (3) Tail boom, stabilator and automatic rotor blade folding systems and parts and components ‘‘special y designed' therefor; (4) Aircraft wing folding systems and parts and components ‘‘special y designed' therefor; (5) Tail hooks and arresting gear and parts and components ‘‘special y designed' therefor; (6) Bomb racks, missile launchers, missile rails, weapon pylons, pylon-to launcher adapters, UAV launching systems, and external stores support systems and parts and components ‘‘special y designed' therefor; (7) Damage/failure-adaptive flight control systems; (8) Threat-adaptive autonomous flight control systems; (9) Non-surface-based flight control systems and ef ectors, e.g., thrust vectoring from gas ports other than main engine thrust vector, ‘‘special y designed' for aircraft; (10) Radar altimeters with output power management or signal modulation (i.e., frequency hopping, chirping, direct sequence-spectrum spreading) LPI (low probability of intercept) capabilities; (11) Air-to-air refueling systems and hover-in-flight refueling (HIFR) systems and parts and components ‘‘specially designed'' therefor; (12) UAV flight control systems and vehicle management systems with swarming capability, i.e., UAVs interact with each other to avoid col isions and stay together, or, if weaponized, coordinate targeting; (13) Aircraft lithium-ion bat eries that provide 28 VDC or 270 VDC; (14) Lift fans, clutches, and rol posts for short take-of , vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft and parts and components ‘‘special y designed'' for such lift fans and rol posts; (15) Helmet Mounted Cueing Systems, Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing Systems (JHMCS), Helmet Mounted Displays, Display and Sight Helmets (DASH), and variants thereof; (16) Fire control computers, mission computers, vehicle management computers, integrated core processers, stores management systems, armaments control processors, aircraft-weapon interface units and computers (e.g., AGM–88 HARM Aircraft Launcher Interface Computer (ALIC)) ‘‘specially designed'' for (17) Radomes ‘‘special y designed' for operation in multiple or nonadjacent radar bands or designed to withstand a combined thermal shock greater than 4.184 x 106 J/m2 accompanied by a peak overpressure of greater than 50 kPa; (18) Drive systems and flight control systems ‘ specially designed' to function after impact of a 7.62 mm or larger projectile; or (19) Any component, part, accessory, at achment, equipment, or system that: (i) is classified; (ii) contains classified software; (i i) is manufactured using classified production data; or (iv) is being developed using classified information. (i) Technical data (as defined in § 120.10 of this subchapter) and defence services (as defined in § 120.9 of this subchapter) directly related to the defence articles enumerated in paragraphs (a) through (h) of this category. (See § 125.4 of this subchapter for exemptions.)
ITAR Part 121.3 - Aircraft and related articles.
(a) In Category VI I, except as described in (b) below, ‘‘aircraft' means developmental, production, or inventory (1) Are U.S.-origin aircraft that bear an original military designation of A, B, E, F, K, M, P, R or S; (2) Are foreign-origin aircraft ‘ specially designed' to provide functions equivalent to those of the aircraft listed in (a)(1) of this section; Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
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(3) Are armed or are ‘‘special y designed' to be used as a platform to deliver munitions or otherwise destroy targets (e.g., firing lasers, launching rockets, firing missiles, dropping bombs, or strafing); (4) Are strategic airlift aircraft capable of airlifting payloads over 35,000 lbs to ranges over 2,000 nm without being refueled in-flight into short or unimproved airfields; (5) Are capable of being refueled inflight; or (6) Incorporate any ‘‘mission systems' control ed under this subchapter. (b) Aircraft ‘ special y designed' for military applications that are not identified in (a) of this section, including any unarmed military aircraft, regardless of origin or designation, manufactured prior to 1956 and unmodified since
manufacture are subject to the EAR. Modifications made to incorporate safety of flight features or other FAA or
NTSB modifications such as transponders and air data recorders are considered ‘‘unmodified' for the purposes of this subparagraph.
Category X - Personal Protective Equipment and Shelters
(a) Personal protective equipment, as fol ows: (1) Body armor providing a protection level equal to or greater than NIJ Type IV. Note 1 to (a)(1): See National Institute of Justice Classification, NIJ Standard-0101.06.
Note 2 to (a)(1): For body armor providing a level of protection of Type I, Type II, Type IIA, Type II A, or Type II , see
ECCNs 1A005 and 1A613. (2) Personal protective clothing, equipment, or face paints ‘ special y designed' to protect against or reduce detection by radar, IR, or other sensors at wavelengths greater than 900 nanometers. Note to (a)(2): See Category XI I(j) for controls on related materials.
(5) Integrated helmets, not specified in Category VI I (h)(15) or Category XI , incorporating optical sights or slewing devices, which include the ability to aim, launch, track, or manage munitions. (6) Helmets and helmet shel s providing a protection level equal to or greater than NIJ Type IV. (7) Goggles, spectacles, or visors, employing other than common broadband absorptive dyes and UV inhibitors as a means of protection (e.g., narrow band filters/dyes or broadband limiters/coatings with high visible transparency), with optical density greater than 3 that protect against: (i) Visible (in-band) wavelengths; (i ) Thermal flashes associated with nuclear detonations; or (i i) Near infrared or ultraviolet (out-of-band) wavelengths. Note 1 to (a)(7): See Category XI I(j) for controls on related materials.
Note 2 to (a)(7): See Category XI for sensor protection equipment.
(8) Developmental personal protective equipment and shelters and ‘‘special y designed' parts, components, accessories, and at achments therefor, developed under a contract with the U.S. Department of Defence. Note to (a)(8): Developmental personal protective equipment and shelters, and ‘ special y designed' parts,
components, accessories, and at achments therefor, determined to be subject to the EAR via a commodity jurisdiction determination (see § 120.4 of this subchapter) are not control ed by this paragraph. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
(d) Parts, components, assemblies, and associated equipment for the personal protective equipment controlled in this category as fol ows: (1) Ceramic or composite plates that provide protection equal to or greater than NIJ Type IV. (2) Lenses for the goggles, spectacles, and visors control ed in paragraph (a)(7) of this category. (3) Any component, part, accessory, at achment, equipment, or system that: (i) Is classified; (i ) Contains classified software; (i i) Is manufactured using classified production data; or (iv) Is being developed using classified information. (e) Technical data (as defined in S. 120.10 of this subchapter) and defence services (as defined in § 120.9 of this subchapter) directly related to the defence articles enumerated in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this
Category XI – Fire Control, Range Finder, Optical and Guidance and Control Equipment

It is not yet known what items and technologies wil be proposed for removal from the USML. As Canada is a
significant manufacturer of items that fal under this Category, any changes could have a major impact on Canadian industry. Proposed rule changes are expected in the near future (07 June 2012).
Category XI I – Auxiliary Military Equipment
It is proposed to remove a significant number of items and their related parts and components from Category XI I and place them in the CCL. Below is the proposed Category XI I. (b) Information security/information assurance systems and equipment, cryptographic devices, software and components "special y designed" for military applications (e.g., command, control and communications (C3), and government intelligence applications), as fol ows: (1) Military cryptographic (including key management) systems, equipment assemblies, modules, integrated circuits, components or software (e.g., cryptographic interfaces) capable of maintaining secrecy or confidentiality of information or information systems, including equipment and software for tracking, telemetry and control (TT&C) encryption and decryption; (2) Military cryptographic (including key management) systems, equipment, assemblies, modules, integrated circuits, components and software (e.g., cryptographic interfaces) capable of generating spreading or hopping codes for spread spectrum systems or equipment; (3) Military cryptanalytic systems, equipment, assemblies, modules, integrated circuits, components or software; (4) Military systems, equipment, assemblies, modules, integrated circuits, components and software that provide certified or certifiable multi-level security or user isolation, or control of the exchange of or access to information between or among systems operating at dif erent classification levels, and software to certify such systems, equipment or software; Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
(5) Ancil ary equipment specifical y designed, developed, modified, adapted, or configured for the articles in paragraphs (b)(1) – (b)(4) of this category. (d) Ablative Materials, as follows: (1) Ablative materials fabricated or semi-fabricated from advanced composities (e.g., silica, graphite, carbon, carbon/carbon and boron filaments) "special y designed" for the articles in Category IV; or (2) Carbon/carbon bil ets and preforms which are reinforced with continuous unidirectional fibres, tows, tapes, or woven cloths in three or more dimensional planes. (e) Armour (e.g., organic, ceramic, metal ic), active armour or reactive armour, and armour materials, as follows: (1) Developmental armour developed under contract with the U.S. DOD; (2) Spaced armour with Em greater than 1.4 and meeting NIJ Level II or bet er; (3) Transparent armour having Em greater than or equal to 1.3 or having Em less than 1.3 and meeting NIJ Level III standards with areal density less than or equal to 40 pounds per square foot; (4) Transparent ceramic plate greater that ¼ inch-thick and larger than 8 inches X 8 inches, exchanging glass for transparent armour; (5) Non-transparent ceramic plate or blanks greater that ¼ inches thick and larger than 8 inches X 8 inches for transparent armour. This includes spinel aluminum oxynitride (ALON); (6) Composite armour with Em greater than 1.4 and meeting NIJ Level II or bet er; or (7) Metal laminate armour with Em greater than 1.4 and meeting NIJ Level I I or bet er. (f)Any material that: (1) Is classified; (2) Is manufactured using classified production data; or (3)Is being developed using classified information. ‘‘Classified'' means classified pursuant to Executive Order 13526, or predecessor order, and a security classification guide developed pursuant thereto or equivalent, or to the corresponding classification rules of another government. (g) Concealment and deception equipment, as fol ows (MT): *(1) Polymers loaded with carbonyl iron powder, ferrites, iron whiskers, fibers, flakes, or other magnetic additives having a surface resistivity of less than 5000 ohms/square and isotropy of less than 5%; (2) Multi-layer camouflage systems ‘ special y designed' to reduce detection of platforms or equipment in Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
the infrared or ultraviolet frequency spectrums; *(3) High temperature (greater than 300 deg F operation) ceramic or magnetic radar absorbing material (RAM) ‘‘specially designed'' for use on defence articles or military items subject to the EAR; or *(4) Broadband (greater than 30% bandwidth) lightweight (less than 2 lbs/ sq ft) magnetic radar absorbing material (RAM) ‘‘specially designed'' for use on defence articles or military items subject to the EAR. (h) Energy conversion devices, as fol ows: (1) Fuel cells ‘‘specially designed'' for platforms or soldier systems specified in this subchapter; (2) Thermal engines ‘ special y designed' for platforms or soldier systems specified in this subchapter; (3) Thermal bat eries (MT); or (4) Thermionic generators. (i) Signature reduction software, technical data, and services, as fol ows (MT): *(1) Software associated with the measurement or modification of system signatures; *(2) Software for design of low observable platforms; *(3) Software for design, analysis, prediction, or optimization of signature management solutions; *(4) Radar cross section or infrared signature measurement or prediction software; *(5) Signature management techniques, codes, and algorithms; *(6) Signature control design methodology; *(7) Processes that use microencapsulation or micro-spheres to reduce infrared, radar, or visual detection of platforms or equipment; *(8) Multi-layer camouflage system techniques to reduce detection of platforms or equipment; *(9) Multi-spectral surface treatment techniques to modify infrared, visual or radio frequency signatures of platforms *(10) Shaping, active, or passive techniques to modify platform or equipment visual, electro-optical, radiofrequency, electric, magnetic, electromagnetic, or wake signatures (e.g., low probability of intercept (LPI) techniques, methods or applications); or *(11) Shaping, active, or passive techniques to modify defence articles' acoustic signatures. *(j) Equipment, materials, coatings, and treatments not elsewhere specified, as fol ows: (1) Laser eye-safe media including narrow band dyes/coatings and wide band non-linear optical material ‘‘specially designed'' for goggles, spectacles, or visors that provide narrow band filtering or broad band limiting with optical density greater than 3 that protect against: (i) Visible (in-band) wavelengths; Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
(i ) Thermal flashes associated with nuclear detonations; or
(ii ) Near Infrared or Ultra Violet (outof-band) wavelengths. Note: See Category X(a)(7).
(2) Special y treated or formulated dyes, coatings, and fabrics used in the design, manufacture, or production of personnel protective clothing, equipment, or face paints designed to protect against or reduce detection by radar, infrared, or other sensors at wavelengths greater than 900 nanometers.
Note:
See Category X(a)(2).
(3) Equipment, materials, coatings, and treatments that are ‘‘special y designed'' to modify the electro-optical, radiofrequency, infrared, electric, laser, magnetic, electromagnetic, acoustic, electro-static, or wake signatures of defence articles or military items subject to the EAR through control of absorption, reflection, or emission. (k) Tooling and equipment, as fol ows: (1) Tooling and equipment ‘ special y designed' for production of low observable (LO) components; or (2) Portable platform signature field repair validation equipment (e.g., portable optical interrogator that validates integrity of a repair to a signature reduction structure). (l) Technical data (as defined in § 120.10 of this subchapter), and defence services (as defined in § 120.9 of this subchapter) directly related to the defence articles enumerated in paragraphs (a) through (h), (j), and (k) of this category. (See also § 123.20 of this subchapter.) (MT for technical data and defence services related to articles designated as such.) (m) The fol owing interpretations explain and amplify terms used in this category and elsewhere in this (1) Composite armor is defined as having more than one layer of dif erent materials or a matrix. (2) Spaced armors are metal ic or non-metal ic armors that incorporate an air space or obliquity or discontinuous material path ef ects as part of the defeat mechanism. (3) Reactive armor employs explosives, propel ants, or other materials between plates for the purpose of enhancing plate motion during a bal istic event or otherwise defeating the penetrator. (4) Electromagnetic armor (EMA) employs electricity to defeat threats such as shaped charges. (5) Materials used in composite armor could include layers of metals, plastics, elastomers, fibers, glass, ceramics, ceramic-glass reinforced plastic laminates, encapsulated ceramics in a metal ic or non-metallic matrix, functionally gradient ceramic-metal materials, or ceramic balls in a cast metal matrix. (6) For this Category, a material is considered transparent if it al ows 75% or greater transmission of light in the visible spectrum through a 1 mm thick nominal sample. (7) The material control ed in paragraph (e)(3) of this category has not been treated to reach the 75% transmission level referenced in (m)(6) of this category. (8) Metal laminate armors are two or more layers of metal ic materials which are mechanical y or adhesively bonded together to form an armor system. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
(9) Em is the line-of-sight target mass ef ectiveness ratio and provides a measure of the tested armor's performance to that of rol ed homogenous armor, where Em is defined as follows: rRHA = density of RHA, (7.85 g/cm3) Po = Baseline Penetration of RHA, (mm) Pr = Residual Line of Sight Penetration, either positive or negative (mm RHA equivalent) ADTARGET = Line-of-Sight Areal Density of (10) NIJ is the National Institute of Justice and Level II refers to the requirements specified in NIJ standard 0108.01 Bal istic Resistant Protective.
USML Category XIX - Gas Turbine Engines and Associated Equipment
The US proposes to introduce USML Category XIX to cover gas turbine engines and associated equipment currently covered in Categories VI, VI , and VI I. The USML identifies engine subcategories in al three of these categories, but there has been confusion concerning the controls in Category VI (which currently lists only ‘‘naval nuclear propulsion plants,' leading exporters to question whether other types of propulsion systems are control ed as ‘‘components' in Category VI(f)), Category VI (which controls both diesel and gas turbine engines under the same general term ‘ engines' in Category VI (f)), and Category VI I (which controls ‘‘military aircraft engines' but not reciprocating engines). The intent of this change is to make clear that gas turbine engines for surface vessels, vehicles, and aircraft that meet certain objective parameters are control ed on the USML. Al other engines are control ed under the EAR.

Category XIX - Gas Turbine Engines and Associated Equipment, as follows:
*(a) Turbofan and Turbojet engines, whether in development, production, or inventory (including technology demonstrators), capable of 15,000 lbf (66.7 kN) of thrust or greater that have any of the fol owing: (1) with or capable of thrust augmentation (afterburner); (2) thrust or exhaust nozzle vectoring; (3) contains parts or components control ed in paragraph (f)(4) of this category; (4) capable of inverted flight; (5) capable of high power extraction (greater than 50 percent of engine thrust) at altitudes greater than (6) capable of directed flow thrust reversing using bypass/fan and core flow air and also capable for being deployed in flight. *(b) Turboshaft and Turboprop engines, whether in development, production, or inventory (including technology demonstrators), capable of 1500 shp (1119 kW) or greater that have any of the fol owing: (1) Cooled low pressure turbine, cooled intermediate pressure turbine, or cooled power turbine; (2) contains parts or components control ed in paragraph (f)(4)(i) or (f)(4)(i ) of this category; or (3) capable of oil sump sealing when the engine is in the vertical position. (c) Engines, whether in development, production, or inventory (including technology demonstrators), ‘ special y designed' for armed or military unmanned aerial vehicle systems, cruise missiles, or target drones. *(d) AGT1500, CTS800, TF40B, T55, TF60, T700, and TF50 engines. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
*(e) Digital engine controls (e.g., Ful Authority Digital Engine Controls (FADEC) and Digital Electronic Engine Controls (DEEC)) ‘‘specially designed' for gas turbine engines control ed in this category. (f) Components, parts, accessories, at achments, or associated equipment as follows: (1) components, parts, accessories, at achments, and equipment ‘‘special y designed' for the fol owing U.S.- origin engines (and military variants thereof): AE1107C, F101, F107, F112, F118, F119, F120, F124, F125, F135, F136, F414, F415, J402, GE38, TF40B, and TF60;
Note:
Digital engine controls (e.g., Ful Authority Digital Engine Controls (FADEC) and Digital Electronic Engine
Controls (DEEC)) ‘‘specially designed' for the engines identified in (f)(1) of this category are control ed by (e) of this *(2) hot section components (i.e., combustors, turbine blades, vanes, nozzles, disks and shrouds) ‘‘specially designed' for gas turbine engines control ed in this category and related cooled components (i.e., cooled low pressure turbine blades, vanes, disks; cooled augmenters; and cooled nozzles) ‘‘special y designed' for gas turbine engines control ed in this category. The cowl, dif user, dome, chamber, shel s, and liners for the combustors are also controlled by this paragraph; (3) engine monitoring systems (i.e., prognostics, diagnostics, and health) ‘‘special y designed' for gas turbine engines and components control ed in this category; or (4) any component, part, accessory, at achment, equipment, or system that: (i) is classified; (ii) contains classified software; (i i) is manufactured using classified production data; or (iv) is being developed using classified information. (g) Technical data and defence services directly related to the defence articles enumerated in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this category.
USML Category XX - Submersibles and Related Articles
This proposed rule revises USML Category XX, covering submersible vessels and related articles (see ITAR Part 121.14 for list of vessel types). The proposed revision accounts for the movement of submarines from Category VI and consolidates the controls that wil apply to al submersible vessels in a single category. In addition, naval nuclear propulsion power plants for submersible vessels control ed under Category XX, formerly control ed under Category VI(e), wil now be control ed under Category XX(b), as fol ows: (a) Submersible and semi-submersible vessels that are: *(1) submarines; (2) mine countermeasure vehicles; (3) anti-submarine warfare vehicles; (5) swimmer delivery vehicles ‘ special y designed' for the deployment, recovery, or support of swimmers or divers from submarines; (6) vessels equipped with any mission systems control ed under the USML; or *(7) developmental vessels developed under a contract with the U.S.Department of Defence. *(b) Naval nuclear propulsion plants, their land prototypes, and special facilities for their construction, support, and maintenance (see ITAR Part 123.20 for types). Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)
Canada's Controlled Goods Program
(c) Components, parts, accessories, at achments, and associated equipment ‘‘special y designed' for any of the articles in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this category.
Note to paragraph (c):
Parts, components, accessories, and at achments that are common to vessels subject to the
EAR, or that are enumerated on the CCL or elsewhere in the ITAR are not included in paragraph (c). The proposed rule controls only those parts, components, accessories, and at achments that are specifical y designed for an article control ed in Category XX. Al other parts, components, accessories, and at achments wil be subject to the EAR.
(d) Technical data (as defined in ITAR Part 120.10) and defence services (as defined in § 120.9 of this subchapter) directly related to the defence articles enumerated in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this category. Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI)

Source: https://www.defenceandsecurity.ca/UserFiles/File/CanadianControlledGoods.pdf

Three cases of stroke following peripheral venous interventions

Published online before print 21 March 2011, doi: 10.1258/phleb.2010.010044Phlebology October 2011 vol. 26 no. 7 280-284 Three cases of stroke following peripheralvenous interventions Author Affiliations Correspondence: Dr Kurosh Parsi FACD FACP, Suite 1501, 520 Oxford St, Bondi Junction, NSW 2010, Australia. Email:

Microsoft word - san ignacio - autobiografia de san ignacio.doc

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