Chiaramente, ogni formato ha i propri vantaggi e svantaggi acquista antibiotici online per effettuare un acquisto, non è necessario fornire la prescrizione medica.

8th grade, objective 8

NC Comprehensive School Health Training Center 8th Grade, Objective 8.03 Objective:
Analyze the safe and effective use of methods of FDA-approved contraceptives to prevent
unintended pregnancy.
Materials:
Appendix 1a, b– Stella's Story and teacher master
Appendix 2a, b – Summary Table of Contraceptive Methods (background for teacher)
2007 FDA Birth Control Guide (see CD-ROM)
PowerPoint – Contraceptives
Contraceptives Kit with sample of methods of birth control
Appendix 3a, b – template cut and taped to index cards. One set for each student, or pairs
Different contraceptive examples (condoms, birth control pills, Nuvaring, Orthoevra)
Appendix 4a, b– Public Service Announcement Template and scoring rubric

Review:
Assess students' recall of the O-M cycle and when conception is most likely to occur (G6, 2.07
Summarize the relationship between conception and the menstrual cycle).
To begin our lesson, I would like to see what you recall about the ovulation-menstruation cycle
and other changes that occur during puberty. I have a story that I will distribute and you will
need to fill in the blanks using the word bank.
Distribute "Stella's Story" (Appendix 1).

Go over Teacher Key of "Stella's Story" (Appendix 2) and have students volunteer to fill in the
blanks.
Statement of Objectives:
There are many reasons to delay parenthood and prevent unintended pregnancy. Today we will
analyze the safe and effective use of methods of FDA-approved contraceptives to prevent
unintended pregnancy as well as considerations for use.

Focus:
[Set up ahead of time the following bags of beans:
Contraceptive implants (99 red beans; 1 white bean)
Injectable contraceptives (99 red beans; 1 white bean)
Oral contraceptives (95 red beans; 5 white beans)
Contraceptive skin patch (95 red beans; 5 white beans)
Vaginal contraceptive ring (95 red beans; 5 white beans)
Male condom (85 red beans; 15 white beans)
Female condom (80 red beans; 20 white beans)
Contraceptive sponge (68 red beans; 32 white beans)
Vaginal spermicides (70 red beans; 30 white beans)
Withdrawal (73 red beans; 27 white bean)
Objective 8.03, page 1 NC Comprehensive School Health Training Center
The Bag of Beans Activity (adapted from Ms. Deborah L. Tackmann, Health Educator in Eau
Claire, Wisconsin) is intended to provide a visual representation of the effectiveness and failure
rate of common methods of contraceptives. The bags are set up ahead of time with two
colorful beans: red beans representing NOT pregnant and white beans representing pregnant.
Also in each bag is a slip of paper which states the method of birth control.
A bag is given to each pair of students. One student closes his or her eyes and takes out six
beans. If one of those beans is white, that represents an unintended pregnancy attributed to
the failure rate of the method. Draw this conclusion: The more effective the method, the less
chance for an unintended pregnancy.

Make this statement: Most contraceptive methods are highly effective if used consistently and
correctly. Most cases of failure of methods are human error, meaning that the person or couple

did not use the method correctly or did not use the method every time they had sex.
Abstinence is cited as having a 100% effectiveness rate, but it must also be practiced
consistently and correctly
. Many teens who become pregnant or get their girlfriend pregnant
intended
to be abstinent and have not planned how to avoid pregnancy with a method of birth
control. Responsible teens acknowledge the possible risk and plan to prevent it.

We will learn more about the correct use of each of these products to maximize their
effectiveness. This is information you may not need now, but are very likely to need within a few
years.

Teacher Input:
Please note: the contraceptives listed and described in the PowerPoint are not all of the
methods approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but include the most common ones
used by or prescribed for teens.
Show the PowerPoint on contraceptives approved by the Food and Drug Administration.
Display different contraceptive methods to by holding them up or passing them around the
room. [Your local school system may have a policy about whether students are allowed to
handle these products.] See Appendix 2 – Summary of Contraceptive Efficacy for additional
background information on effectiveness rates. Another very useful resource is the 2007 FDA
Birth Control Guide [included in CD-ROM.]
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/FreePublications/UCM
207070.pdf
Objectives of PowerPoint:
• Identify various considerations for contraceptive methods • List commonly used contraceptive methods • Explain how contraceptives work Objective 8.03, page 2 NC Comprehensive School Health Training Center • Consider contraceptive options
Guided Practice:
Create cards by printing Appendix 3a, cutting methods and taping or laminating to index cards.
The correct order appears on Appendix 3b. Distribute to students the envelopes with methods
for sequencing the effectiveness of methods. Students can work individually or in pairs.
Within your envelopes you will find the contraceptive methods we've talked about. Using the
information from PowerPoint presentation, decide the order for the methods from MOST
effective to LEAST effective and order them top to bottom.

Processing questions:
Which method did you decide was most effective? Why?
Which method was least effective? Why?
How important is correct and consistent use of each product?
What would happen to the effectiveness for pregnancy prevention and STD prevention if the
male used a condom and the female used a prescription method at the same time
? [Explain that
in countries with the lowest teen pregnancy and STD rates, sexually active teens use a condom
plus another method, often called "Double Dutch."]
Independent Practice:
Advertisements or commercials inform the public about products they can buy (clothes or video
games) or services they can pay for (like internet services or cell phones). Public service
announcements (PSAs) instead inform the public about a message or an idea. A 30-second spot
has around 60 -75 words. Now that you are familiar with some common methods of
contraception, I would like you to create a radio public service announcement (PSA) for people
who are thinking about becoming sexually active and need to choose a contraceptive method. In
your PSA, you need to include the following content. The message can be up to one-minute long.

Definition of contraception Who should use contraception Some of the choices Some of the considerations
[Make sure the students have the option of creating an ad for "Double Dutch."]

Distribute the instruction for creating the Public Service Announcement (Appendix 4a) and the
Scoring Rubric for the PSA (Appendix 4b). Explain the criteria for completing the assignment
and receiving a good grade.
Closure:
Today we discussed different methods of contraception that are safe and effective in preventing
unintended pregnancy. You have gained evaluation skills and knowledge to apply in your own
assessment of methods of contraception.

Objective 8.03, page 3 Stella's Story Stella is very excited to begin 8th grade in the fall. She's had a really fun summer hanging out with her friends and practicing her favorite new sport, soccer. She also got a new dog and named her Ella. She's a little anxious about beginning a new year, too. She has experienced a lot of change recently. About two years ago, Stella began to experience changes in her body triggered by the release
of hormones. This is called . She started to grow breasts and her hips began to
. Hair started to grow in some new places (like the and the
). She was excited but a little nervous also.
Another big deal that happened during the summer was her period, also called
- . Stella knew that the first period was called
― _‖ and it usually started about _ years after the beginning of puberty. Stella
had learned several things about her period in her sixth grade health class. She knew
that there were four phases for her cycle, _,
and ; and that having a period now meant that she could _ a
child.
An average cycle for females is around _ days, but most girls take a while to become
regular. The first day of the cycle is when _ occurs, or the shedding of
the lining of the uterus. , or the ovary releasing an egg, generally occurs
about 14 days the period, making this the most time for
conception to occur. For this to happen, _ has to unite with the egg in the
.
Stella has noticed a few things about her body when she is about to begin her period, or
during her period. Sometimes she is irritable (she blames it on ) and her
become swollen and painful. During her period, she often has but
has discovered that physical activity, like soccer, and a mild pain reliever really seem to
help.
Overall, Stella thinks that growing up is not so bad. One day she would like to have
children and this is an important step to making that happen. When Stella knows she's
going to have her period soon, she keeps a or in her book bag or
purse. She also makes a note in her journal of the first day of her period just to help
keep track of things. Stella's feeling more grown up and excited about 8th grade and
spending time with her new buddy, Ella.

Word bank: hormones, widen, pad, ovulation-menstruation, twenty-
eight, menarche, sperm, tampon, before, two, Menses, conceive,
puberty, Ovulation, Progestational Phase, underarms, ovulation,
likely, Fallopian tube, Estrogenic Phase, breasts, pubic area, cramps

Objective 8.03, Appendix 1a Stella's Story (Master) Stella is very excited to begin 8th grade in the fall. She's had a really fun summer
hanging out with her friends and practicing her favorite new sport, soccer. She also got
a new dog and named her Ella. She's a little anxious about beginning a new year, too.
She has experienced a lot of change recently. About two years ago, Stella began to
experience changes in her body triggered by the release of hormones. This is called
puberty. She started to grow breasts and her hips began to widen. Hair started to grow
in some new places (like the underarms and the pubic area). She was excited but a little
nervous also.
Another big deal that happened during the summer was her period, also called
ovulation-menstruation. Stella knew that the first period was called ―menarche‖ and it
usually started about two years after the beginning of puberty. Stella had learned
several things about her period in her sixth grade health class. She knew that there
were four phases for her cycle, Menses, Estrogenic phase, Ovulation, and
Progestational phase; and that having a period now meant that she could conceive a
child.
An average cycle for females is around twenty-eight days, but most girls take a while to
become regular. The first day of the cycle is when menstruation occurs, or the shedding
of the lining of the uterus. Ovulation, or the ovary releasing an egg, generally occurs
about 14 days before the period, making this the most likely time for conception to
occur. For this to happen, a sperm has to unite with the egg in the Fallopian tube.
Stella has noticed a few things about her body when she is about to begin her period or
during her period. Sometimes she is irritable (she blames it on hormones) and her
breasts become swollen and painful. During her period, she often has cramps but has
discovered that physical activity, like soccer, and a mild pain reliever really seem to
help.
Overall, Stella thinks that growing up is not so bad. One day she would like to have
children and this is an important step to making that happen. When Stella knows she's
going to have her period soon, she keeps a pad or tampon in her book bag or purse.
She also makes a note in her journal of the first day of her period just to help keep track
of things. Stella's feeling more grown up and excited about 8th grade and spending time
with her new buddy, Ella.

Word bank: puberty, widen, underarms, pubic area, ovulation-
menstruation, menarche, two, Menses, Estrogenic Phase, Ovulation,
Progestational Phase, conceive, twenty-eight, ovulation, likely, sperm,
Fallopian tube, hormones, breasts, cramps, pad, tampon

Objective 8.03, Appendix 1b SUMMARY TABLE OF CONTRACEPTIVE EFFICACY This information is not given to students. It is background information for teachers. Percentage of women experiencing an unintended pregnancy during the first year of
typical use and the first year of perfect use of contraception and the percentage continuing
use at the end of the first year. United States.

% of Women Experiencing an
% of Women
Unintended Pregnancy within the First
Continuing Use at
Year of Use
One Year 3
Typical Use 1
Perfect Use 2
No method 4
Spermicides 5
Fertility awareness-based methods
--------Standard Days method 6
--------TwoDay method 6
--------Ovulation method 6
--------Parous women --------Nulliparous women Diaphragm 7
--------Female (Reality) Combined pill and progestin-only --------ParaGard (copper T) --------Mirena (LNG-IUS) Female Sterilization Male Sterilization Objective 8.03, Appendix 2a Emergency Contraceptive Pills: Treatment initiated within 72 hours after unprotected intercourse reduces the risk of
pregnancy by at least 75%. 9
Lactational Amenorrhea Method: LAM is a highly effective, temporary method of contraception. 10
Source: Trussell J. Contraceptive efficacy. In Hatcher RA, Trussell J, Nelson AL, Cates W, Stewart FH, Kowal D. Contraceptive Technology: Nineteenth Revised Edition. New York NY: Ardent Media, 2007. 1 Among typical couples who initiate use of a method (not necessarily for the first time), the percentage who experience
an accidental pregnancy during the first year if they do not stop use for any other reason. Estimates of the probability of pregnancy during the first year of typical use for spermicides, withdrawal, periodic abstinence, the diaphragm, the male condom, the pill, and Depo-Provera are taken from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth corrected for underreporting of abortion; see the text for the derivation of estimates for the other methods.
2 Among couples who initiate use of a method (not necessarily for the first time) and who use it perfectly (both
consistently and correctly), the percentage who experience an accidental pregnancy during the first year if they do not stop use for any other reason. See the text for the derivation of the estimate for each method.
3 Among couples attempting to avoid pregnancy, the percentage who continue to use a method for 1 year.

4 The percentages becoming pregnant in columns (2) and (3) are based on data from populations where contraception is
not used and from women who cease using contraception in order to become pregnant. Among such populations, about 89% become pregnant within 1 year. This estimate was lowered slightly (to 85%) to represent the percentage who would become pregnant within 1 year among women now relying on reversible methods of contraception if they abandoned contraception altogether.
5 Foams, creams, gels, vaginal suppositories, and vaginal film.

6 The Ovulation and TwoDay methods are based on evaluation of cervical mucus. The Standard Days method avoids
intercourse on cycle days 8 through 19.
7 With spermicidal cream or jelly.

8 Without spermicides.

9 The treatment schedule is one dose within 120 hours after unprotected intercourse, and a second dose 12 hours after
the first dose. Both doses of Plan B can be taken at the same time. Plan B (1 dose is 1 white pill) is the only dedicated product specifically marketed for emergency contraception. The Food and Drug Administration has in addition declared the following 22 brands of oral contraceptives to be safe and effective for emergency contraception: Ogestrel or Ovral (1 dose is 2 white pills), Levlen or Nordette (1 dose is 4 light-orange pills), Cryselle, Levora, Low-Ogestrel, Lo/Ovral or Quasence (1 dose is 4 white pills), Tri-Levlen or Triphasil (1 dose is 4 yellow pills), Jolessa, Portia, Seasonale or Trivora (1 dose is 4 pink pills), Seasonique (1 dose is 4 light-blue-green pills), Empresse (1 dose is 4 orange pills), Alesse, Lessina or Levlite (1 dose is 5 pink pills), Aviane (1 dose is 5 orange pills), and Lutera (1 dose is 5 white pills).
10 However, to maintain effective protection against pregnancy, another method of contraception must be used as soon as
menstruation resumes, the frequency or duration of breastfeeds is reduced, bottle feeds are introduced, or the baby reaches 6 months of age. Objective 8.03, Appendix 2b Template for Contraception Cards

Double Dutch

(condom and
contraceptive ring
hormonal method)
Male condom
implants
Female condom
Injectable
Oral contraceptives
Vaginal spermicides
Contraceptive skin
Withdrawal
Objective 8.03, Appendix 3a Correct Order for Contraceptive Effectiveness
1. Double Dutch (condom + hormonal method) 2. Contraceptive implants 3. Injectable contraceptives 4. Oral contraceptives 5. Contraceptive skin patch 6. Vaginal contraceptive ring 7. Male condom 8. Female condom 9. Contraceptive sponge 10. Vaginal spermicides 11. Withdrawal Objective 8.03, Appendix 3b PSA Template
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Time: Agency: Title: City, State, Date — Opening Paragraph (should contain: who, what, when, where, why): Remainder of body text – Definition of contraception Who should use contraception Some of the choices Some of the considerations Objective 8.03, Appendix 4a Contraception Public Service Announcement Partially described Poorly described contraception and described Did not describe methods of contraception Did not describe contraceptive considerations Utilized template Did not utilize template, content partially requirements and word count Objective 8.03, Appendix 4b

Source: http://hlnces.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/file/view/8.03-contraception.pdf

yuasa-hara.co.jp

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY NEWS CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE skilled in the art by totalizing the whole statement in Amendment Requirements of Chinese Patent Applications the originally attached description, etc. If, therefore, an Compared with Those of amendment does not introduce new technical matters in Japanese Patent Applications

Microsoft word - san ignacio - autobiografia de san ignacio.doc

Autobiografía de San Ignacio de Loyola – P.Luis Goncalves AUTOBIOGRAFIA DE SAN IGNACIO DE LOYOLA (Texto recogido por el P. Luis Goncalves da Camara entre 1553 y 1555 Capítulo I 1. Hasta los 26 años de edad fue hombre dado a vantado, que era cosa fea; lo cual él no pudiendo las vanidades del mundo y principalmente se sufrir, porque determinaba seguir el mundo, y