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Naturetrek Tour Report 22 - 29 April 2016 Hermann's Tortoise Report and images by Ian Nicholson & Martin Beaton T: +44 (0)1962 733051
Tour Report
Tour participants: Ian Nicholson & Martin Beaton (leader) with 14 Naturetrek clients This holiday looked at all aspects of wildlife on the attractive island of Menorca, focussing mainly on birds and plants, but also including butterflies and dragonflies, although it was slightly early in the season for the latter two groups. The weather was somewhat mixed, with a couple of chilly mornings, but also some sunny afternoons, and during the course of the week we saw a good variety of wildlife, as well as touching briefly on some of the history of the island. Friday 22nd April
With the exception of Martin, who was already in Menorca having carried out a short recce over the previous two days, the group assembled at Gatwick for the 9.00 flight to Mahon, which departed more or less on time and arrived somewhat ahead of schedule. The minibuses had already been organised by Martin, who met us at the airport along with Llorenc, our host at the hotel for the week, and we were soon at Matxani Gran, which is only about a 10 minute drive from the airport. After our rooms were allocated we enjoyed lunch on the terrace before walking around the fields belonging to the hotel, accompanied at times by the donkeys and sheep which graze there. Birds seen on our walk included a reasonable selection of summer migrants, including Whinchat, Wheatear, Redstart, and Woodchat Shrike, but the star bird was a stunning male Golden Oriole which showed fairly briefly in a dead fig tree and then on the ground before disappearing into the dense bushes, never to be seen again. The fields and tracks around our hotel provided a useful introduction to the islands plants. Aleppo pines (Pinus halepensis) grow along the hotel track and in the fields behind the hotel both Common Asphodel (Asphodelus aestivus) and Hollow-Leaved Asphodel (Asphodelus fistulosus) occur along with Milk thistle (Silybum marianum) and Boar thistle (Galactites tomentosa), conspicuous plants that are common on roadsides and uncultivated fields around the island. Alongside these large plants we found the delicate annual daisy (Bellis annua) and the oddly shaped leaves of the small yellow Annual Hyoseris (Hyoseris scabra). We then returned to the hotel to settle into our rooms before meeting up for a drink and to talk about our plans for the next few days, and enjoying an excellent evening meal. The whole group retired early after a long day travelling. Saturday 23rd April
Some of the group met at 7.00am for a pre-breakfast walk along the entrance track. Things were fairly quiet, but we found a Hoopoe, a Woodchat Shrike and a couple of Blackcaps, in addition to many Nightingales and Cetti's Warblers singing from deep cover. After breakfast we set off for the north of the island, passing roadsides full of red clumps of French Honysuckle (Hedysarum coronarium). After passing through Es Mercadal we stopped first of all near a Bee-eater colony, but unfortunately the birds had not arrived from their wintering areas yet. However, we did see about a dozen Naturetrek August 16
Tour Report
Booted Eagles overhead, enabling us to see the contrast between the dark and pale forms of this species, plus a couple of Egyptian Vultures. In the adjacent fields we found Purple Vipers-bugloss (Echium plantagineum) and Blue Alkanet (Anchusa azurea) and the unusual but attractive yellow flowers of Hypecoum (Hypecoum procumbens). Moving on to Tirant Marsh we found the water level very low, following a very dry winter in the Balearic Islands, but there were a few Little Egrets to be seen, as well as a Marsh Harrier and several Zitting Cisticolas. Paul and Ian found a very small European Pond Terrapin in the middle of the road, and this was placed safely in the long grass after showing it to the group. We also had rather distant views of a flock of Bee-eaters which were probably migrants stopping off on their way further north and east, rather than local breeding birds. This extensive marsh is dominated by Common Spike Rush (Eleocharius palustris) and dotted with Tamarisk (Tamarisk gallica) but close to the edge of the track we found the Large Leafed Buttercup (Ranunculuc macrophyllus) and the Snakes-tongue Crowfoot (Ranunculus ophioglossifolius). By this time we were beginning to feel hungry, so we drove the short distance to Cala Tirant where we enjoyed our picnic lunch, after which the botanists in the party explored a nearby hillside while the rest of the group went to the sand dunes. This provide an opportunity to see the typical shrub community of the island with the pampas like Mauritanian grass (Ampelodesmos mauritanica), Spiny Broom (Calicotome spinosa), Grey-leaved Cistus (Cistus albidus), Sage-leaved Cistus (Cistus salvifolius), Phoenician Juniper (Juniperus phoenicea) and Many-flowered Heath (Erica multiflora). Two Little Ringed Plovers and two Audouin's Gulls were on the beach and there was a Little Grebe on the river and a Hoopoe in the bushes. In addition there was a Lesser Emperor dragonfly, as well as a Scarlet Darter and several Red-veined Darters, while butterflies were represented by Holly Blue, Clouded Yellow and Small Copper. In the water there were at least six terrapins, but these were all of the non-native Red-eared species which unfortunately tends to push out the European Pond Terrapin. The dunes contained Sea Chamomile (Anthemis maritime), Annual Valerian (Centranthus calcitrapae), Sea Bindweed (Calystegia soldanella) and Sea-holly (Eryngium maritimum). Next we headed to Fornells for a coffee and tea break, and for some of the group to purchase postcards, and our last stop of the day was at the prehistoric site at Torralba, where we spent some time looking at the ancient ruins before returning to the hotel for our evening meal. Sunday 24th April
The pre-breakfast walk today was marred somewhat by a cold, northerly wind which had been blowing for most of the night, but we did manage the only sighting of the week of a Stone Curlew, which Juliet spotted in a gap in the bushes. We got brief, but clear views before it disappeared from sight. After breakfast we set off for Cap de Cavalleria, the most northerly point of the island, stopping on the way at a local café for a supply of water, the supermarket being closed on Sundays. On the drive out to the cape itself we stopped briefly at the old Roman harbour at Sanitja, where we saw a female Montagu's Harrier making its way north against the strong wind, as were a few swallows and martins. Moving on, we stopped again at Cala Viola where three Blue Rock Thrushes were seen distantly, numerous Linnets flitted amongst the low bushes, and Stonechats performed their characteristic song from the top branches. On the seashore we found thousands of By The Wind Sailors washed up. These strange relations of the jellyfish actually consist of many individual organisms joined together and performing different functions. Some form the sail by which it is blown around, while others become tentacles which catch plankton. Naturetrek August 16
Tour Report
The coast here is very exposed. On the shore line we found Rock Samphire (Crithmum maritimum), Sea Lavender (Limomium virgatum) Dwarf Sea-lavender (Limonium minutum) and on the escarpment the low growing spiny bush community (the ‘socarrall') containing the endemic Hedgehog Lettuce (Launaea cervicornis) and the endemic (Anthyllis hystrix), along with (Teucrium subspinosum) and, growing in the barer patches between, the endemic Rodrez's Ragwort (Senecio rodriguezii) and Evax (Evax pygmaea). At the cape most of the birds were being kept low by the wind, but we managed four more Blue Rock Thrushes, two Peregrines, a Scopoli's Shearwater and two smaller shearwaters (Balearic or Yelkouan) which could not be specifically identified at this range. We discovered Spanish Foxglove (Digitalis dubia) growing in a rock face and Sand Crocus (Romulea columnae) we also found the Dragon or Dead-horse Arum (Dracunculus muscivorus) with flowers just emerging. We had lunch in the car park at the cape before heading back inland, stopping again at Sanitja to watch an Osprey for a few minutes, and also stopping in the car park at Platja de Cavalleria, where a few of the group saw a Red-footed Falcon fly quickly by. Those who walked a little way towards the coast found the unusual Coris (Coris monspeliensis) and Shrubby Everlasting (Helichrysum stoechas),. We then headed for the shelter of the south coast at Cala'n Porter to get out of the wind. After a coffee stop, we walked around a scrubby area just inland from the bay, finding lots of Nightingales and Cetti's Warblers, a rather out of place Canada Goose of one of the small races, (which appeared to have paired up with a Muscovy Duck!), and also a very small Hermann's Tortoise which we moved off the path to avoid it being trodden on. On our walk across the sand and through the scrub we noted Yellow Milk-vetch (Astragalus boeticus), Grey Birdsfoot Trefoil (Lotus cytisoides) Small Tree-mallow (Lavatera cretica), Childing Pink (Petrorhagia nanteuilii) in addition there was a splendid display of a red Broomrape (Orobanche crinite). It was only a short drive back to the hotel from this last stop, and we arrived in plenty of time for most of the group to have a rest and a drink before going through the days sightings and enjoying another excellent evening meal. Monday 25th April
By way of a change this morning we headed towards the south coast at Cala Galdana. After parking the vehicles we ascended the wooden steps to the wooded area at the top of the cliffs. This is not really a noted birding area, but we managed to find Blackcaps, Spotted Flycatchers and a Firecrest, plus a Hoopoe near the car park. The site had been heavily cut but with some perseverance we found several specimens of Balearic Orchid (Ophrys balearica). Returning to the vehicles, we drove the short distance to the southern end of the Algendar Gorge, where we had our picnic lunch before walking part of the footpath into the gorge. We were treated to the sight of Egyptian Vultures and Booted Eagles soaring overhead, while the grassy areas held butterflies including Swallowtail, Clouded Yellow, Small Heath and Common Blue, and numerous Nightingales and Cetti's Warblers sang in the undergrowth. Naturetrek August 16
Tour Report
In the grassy areas we found Small Restharrow (Ononis relinata) and Reversed Clover (Trifolium resputinatum), in damper areas the False Grass-poly (Lythrum junceum) and in a remnant small pond Water crowfoot (Ranunculus peltatus) further along the track we saw the Pitch Trefoil (Psoralea bitumenosa). Next we drove to the large resort of Son Bou, where we felt that a coffee stop was in order, although as the tourist season had not really begun yet, we had a little difficulty finding a café open, but eventually we were successful with the assistance of a helpful local resident. Feeling refreshed, we carried on to the far end of the resort, where we parked the vehicles and walked a farm track which overlooked part of the Son Bou wetland area which is not visible from the boardwalks near the beach. This was a productive walk, with many Little and Cattle Egrets, plus two Purple Herons, a Hoopoe, two Turtle Doves, a Blue Rock Thrush and at least four Woodchat Shrikes. Carol had a very brief view of two Golden Orioles, which typically disappeared into the foliage, never to be seen again. Along the track we saw Blue Hound's-tongue (Cyonoglossum creticum). In the marshland towards the end of our walk we found Round Leafed Mint (Mentha suaveolens) Common Water plantain (Alisma plantago-aquatica) and Ranunculus muri As well as the birds and plants, it had been a very successful day for butterflies, considering it was so early in the year, with nine species, including Cleopatra, Speckled Wood and Holly Blue, as well as those previously mentioned. It had been a long day, with the most walking of any day of the holiday, and everyone was pleased to get back to the hotel for a rest before enjoying a drink and our evening meal. Tuesday 26th April
This morning we headed north again, first of all to the wetland area near the tourist resort of Son Parc. The path had become quite overgrown, but we made it through, (finding Thick Leaved Plantain (Plantago crassifolia)) and from a hillside overlooking the pool and marshy area we were able to see Ferruginous Ducks, Red-crested Pochard, Gadwall, Little Grebe and Purple Heron, but best of all were a pair of Western Swamphens (previously known as Purple Gallinule) with a fluffy chick in attendance. We had a quick look at the beach near the car park, and found Figwort (Scrophularia ramosissima) then drove to the picturesque area of Sa Roca where we had our picnic lunch, after checking out the plants around the parking place. Here amongst the wooded slopes thick with Allepo Pine and Tree Heather we found Sawfly Orchid (Ophrys tenthredionifera) and numbers of the spectacular Violet Limodore (Limodorum abortivum). After lunch we drove a little further along the road, hoping to find the parasitic plant Cytinus (Cytinus hypocistis spp hypocistis), which we found growing in a couple of places, before heading to the top of Monte Toro, the highest point on the island, where we had a coffee break. Some of the group visited the church and the gift shop, while others simply admired and photographed the view, which was spectacular on this clear, sunny afternoon. On our descent we found Helichrysum ambiguum growing from a cliff face. Naturetrek August 16
Tour Report
We drove back to the hotel by way of the old road, known as the Cami d'en Kane, named after Richard Kane, the first British governor of Menorca, who ordered this road to be built. It has been replaced by the much wider main road across the island, but it is a pleasant alternative route. We decided to drive along the side of Mahon harbour for a little sight-seeing before finally returning to our hotel. Wednesday 27th April
Today we set off on the longest drive of the week, from our hotel in the south-east of the island to Punta Nati on the north-west tip. We stopped briefly at a Cattle Egret colony just short of the car park, before parking up and walking the remaining distance to the lighthouse and the cliffs. This is the best area on the island to see Short-toed Larks, and they didn't disappoint us, with lots of them singing and perching obligingly on walls and rocks, along with Thekla Larks (of which there seemed to be less this year) and Tawny Pipits. On the cliffs below the lighthouse was an Audouin's Gull, and about four Blue Rock Thrushes were also present. A flock of large birds over the sea attracted our attention, and they turned out to be six Little Egrets and two Black-crowned Night Herons flying determinedly north-east. On the road to the lighthouse we found Squirting Cucumber (Ecballium elaterium), Caper (Capparis spinosa) and Silver Ragwort (Senecio cineraria), whilst on the exposed maritime headland, where Senecio rodriguezii seems to thrive, we also found Dwarf Sea-lavender (Limonium minutum), Curved Hard-grass (Parapholis incurve) and Perennial Glasswort (Arthrocnemon perenne). It had been a very dry winter in Menorca, and a pond which holds the Balearic Green Toad had virtually dried up. Nevertheless, there were numerous tadpoles of this species in the remaining water, although their prospects of survival looked very poor if the dry weather continues. On the way back to the minibuses a small group of us stopped near this pond and were surprised to find a Melodious Warbler in some scrubby vegetation next to the wall, which was a welcome addition to the week's list. Lunch today was to be a barbecue at Llorenc's father's house at the northern end of the Algendar Gorge. After walking down the track from the car park, we sat down at a table on the terrace to enjoy lunch in extremely picturesque surroundings, with Egyptian Vultures overhead and Nightingales singing all around. Perhaps not surprisingly, lunch took longer than usual today, but eventually we said goodbye to Llorenc, thanking him for his hospitality, and set off back to the car park. The group split into those who wanted to walk up the older track, which is quite steep and was badly damaged in a storm last autumn, but which holds some interesting and unusual plants, and the others who were happy to go up the newer track, which is less steep, and has a sound surface. We heard a Scops Owl calling near the car park, but were unable to find it, and a couple of Swallowtail butterflies were also in the car park. Those following the old track were treated to some spectacular finds, including the following endemics: Paeonia cambessedesii, Viola slolonifera, Lysimachia minorenencis, Sibthorpia africana, Cyclamen balearicum, and the ferns Anagramma leptophylla, Aspelenium onopteris and Anagramma leptophylla. After the long day yesterday, we decided on a slightly earlier finish today, and were back at the hotel by 5.00pm, allowing some of the group to walk round the fields adjacent to the hotel, where a few Spotted and Pied Flycatchers were present. Naturetrek August 16
Tour Report
Thursday 28th April
Our last full day began with a visit to Mongofre Nou, a privately owned reserve consisting mainly of disused saltpans and adjacent scrubby areas. At the beginning of the entrance track, those in the leading minibus found a large flock of Yellow Wagtails which appeared to be mainly of the Spanish race iberiae, with a few of the nominate race flava with them, the difference being the white throat and dark cheek of iberiae. Meanwhile, those in the second bus were watching a female Hen Harrier on the ground in a roadside field, and also heard a Quail singing, although there was never any chance of seeing it in the long grass. Moving on to the reserve itself we found Little Ringed Plovers, a Great White Egret and two Little Stints, while Common, Green and Wood Sandpipers allowed a good comparison of the identification features of these three waders. As always, there was a constant musical accompaniment provided by Nightingales and Cetti's Warblers, with Corn Buntings and Goldfinches also contributing. The track into the reserves passes through an interesting area of scrub containing False Olive (Phillyrea angustifolia ) Strawberry Tree (Arbutus unedo) and Many-flowered Heath (Erica multiflora). Beyond the initial scrub lie the salt pans which are dominated by Perennial Glasswort (Arthrocnemon perenne) and Sea-purslane (Halimione portulacoides) and adjacent to the shore the Tree Spurge (Euphorbia dendrodies). After a couple of hours we drove out to Cap Favaritx, where we found the typical ‘soccoral' (the spiny dwarf bush community of the north coast). Additional plants that we found hear included Rodriguez's False Olive (Phillyrea latifolia var rodriquezii) and the Spiny Clover (Dorycnium fulgerans). Amongst these spiny bushes we also discovered the Miniature Daisy (Bellium bellidioides) and the endemic Euphorbia maresii. Our usual lunch spot had been fenced off, but we had no trouble finding an alternative, so after watching some Kestrels, Stonechats and Red-legged Partridges and finding some interesting plants, we ate our picnic before driving the short distance to the lighthouse. The pool near the lighthouse held Ringed, Little Ringed and a single Kentish Plover, plus a Little Stint, while a Gannet flew by, shortly after one of the leaders had said that this species is a winter visitor here, and not usually present in late April! Our principal plant finds her were Hairy Catchfly (Silene sedoides), and Sea Heath (Frankenia hirsute). On the horizon was a large four-masted sailing ship, which we watched for a while before it went out of view behind a headland, and we then returned to the minibuses for the short drive to Es Grau, where we had a tea/coffee break by the beach, finding thousands more By-the-wind Sailors along the shoreline and in the water, as well as good views of two Turtle Doves. We then called at S'Albufera es Grau, the large nature reserve which has been created from what was originally intended to be a massive tourist complex, before the island government withdrew permission for its construction. There were scores of Little Grebes here, as well as a single Great Crested Grebe and numerous Coots, plus two Hermann's Tortoises. We drove back to the hotel via Mahon harbour, where the sailing ship which we had seen earlier was now moored at the quayside, near the various harbour tour boats and private yachts, and then headed to Matxani Gran for our final evening meal. Naturetrek August 16


Tour Report
Friday 29th April
This morning everyone packed their cases and prepared to leave. Some of the group had a final walk around the fields and along the entrance track, seeing Pied and Spotted Flycatchers, a Woodchat Shrike and a Common Redstart, while others just relaxed before setting off for the airport. Our flight back to Gatwick was more or less on time, and on arrival we said our goodbyes and went our separate ways. Everyone agreed it had been a very enjoyable visit to this attractive and interesting island, with its varied scenery and wildlife. Receive our e-newsletter
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Tour Report
Species Lists
Birds (=recorded but not counted; H = heard only) Common name
Scientific name
Tadorna tadorna Anas strepera Anas platyrhynchos     Red-crested Pochard Netta rufina Aythya ferina Ferruginous Duck Aythya nyroca Red-legged Partridge Alectoris rufa Coturnix coturnix Scopoli's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea 10 Balearic/Yelkouan Shearwater Puffinus mauretanicus/yelkouan Tachybaptus ruficollis 12 Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 13 Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 14 Western Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis Ardea cinerea Ardea purpurea Ardea alba Egretta garzetta 19 Northern Gannet Morus bassanus 20 European Shag Phalacrocorax aristotelis 21 Western Osprey Pandion haliaetus 22 Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus Hieraaetus pennatus 24 Western Marsh Harrier Circus aeruginosus Circus cyaneus 26 Montagu's Harrier Circus pygargus Milvus milvus 28 Western Swamphen Porphyrio porphyrio 29 Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 30 Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 31 Eurasian Stone-Curlew Burhinus oedicnemus 32 Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus 33 Northern Lapwing Vanellus vanellus 34 Common Ringed Plover Charadrius hiaticula 35 Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius 36 Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 37 Common Redshank Tringa totanus 38 Common Greenshank Tringa nebularia 39 Green Sandpiper Tringa ochropus 40 Wood Sandpiper Tringa glareola 41 Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos Calidris minuta 43 Audouin's Gull Ichthyaetus audouinii 44 Yellow-legged Gull Larus michahellis       45 Lesser Black-backed Gull Larus fuscus Columba livia       47 Common Wood Pigeon Columba palumbus       Naturetrek August 16
Tour Report
Common name
Scientific name
48 European Turtle Dove Streptopelia turtur 49 Eurasian Collared Dove Streptopelia decaocto       50 Common Cuckoo Cuculus canorus 51 Eurasian Scops Owl Otus scops Tachymarptis melba Apus apus       Apus pallidus 55 European Roller Coracias garrulus 56 European Bee-Eater Merops apiaster 57 Eurasian Hoopoe Upupa epops 58 Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus     59 Red-footed Falcon Falco vespertinus 60 Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus 61 Woodchat Shrike Lanius senator 62 Eurasian Golden Oriole Oriolus oriolus 63 Northern Raven Corvus corax Parus major Galerida theklae 66 Greater Short-toed Lark Calandrella brachydactyla Riparia riparia Hirundo rustica       69 Common House Martin Delichon urbicum     70 Cetti's Warbler Cettia cetti    71 Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus 72 Common Chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita Phylloscopus sibilatrix 74 Melodious Warbler Hippolais polyglotta 75 Zitting Cisticola Cisticola juncidis 76 Eurasian Blackcap Sylvia atricapilla 77 Sardinian Warbler Sylvia melanocephala       78 Common Firecrest Regulus ignicapilla 79 Common Starling Sturnus vulgaris 80 Common Blackbird Turdus merula 81 Spotted Flycatcher Muscicapa striata 82 European Robin Erithacus rubecula 83 Common Nightingale Luscinia megarhynchos       84 European Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca 85 Black Redstart Phoenicurus ochruros 86 Common Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus 87 Blue Rock Thrush Monticola solitarius Saxicola rubetra 89 European Stonechat Saxicola rubicola 90 Northern Wheatear Oenanthe oenanthe 91 House Sparrow Passer domesticus       92 Blue-headed Wagtail Motacilla flava flava Motacilla flava iberiae Motacilla flava cinereocapilla Anthus campestris 94 Common Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs 95 European Greenfinch Chloris chloris       96 Common Linnet Linaria cannabina       Naturetrek August 16
Tour Report
Common name
Scientific name
97 European Goldfinch Carduelis carduelis       98 European Serin Serinus serinus Emberiza calandra       Reptiles & Amphibians Italian Wall Lizard Podarcis sicula      Hermann's Tortoise Testudo hermanni European Pond Terrapin Emys orbicularis Red-necked Terrapin Trachemys scripta Tarentola mauritanica Balearic Green Toad Bufo balearicus Rhinechis scalaris Oryctolagus cuniculus Papilio machaon    Pieris brassicae Pieris rapae    Colias crocea    Gonepteryx rhamni Gonepteryx cleopatra    Lycaena phlaeas Aricia agestis Polyommatus icarus    Vanessa atalanta Cynthia cardui Coenonympha pamphilus     13 Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria    Lasiommata megera Dragonflies & Damsels Copper Demoiselle Calopteryx haemorrhoidalis    Blue-tailed Damselfly Ischnura elegans Crocothemis erythraea Sympetrum striolatum Red-veined Darter Sympetrum fonscolombii Anax parthenope Anax imperator Anacridium aegyptium By the wind Sailor Velella velella Purple-striped Jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca Naturetrek August 16
Tour Report
Plants (* Endemic to Minorca; ** Endemic to Balearic Islands) Scientific Names
English Names
Horsetail Family
Equisetum telmateia Equisetum arvense Common Horsetail Adiantum capillus-veneris Anogramma leptophylla Polypodium australe Southern Polypody Pteridium aquilinum Asplenium onopteris Phyllis sagittata (Syn Asplenium sagitta) Seed plants without true Pinus halepensis ssp halepensis Pinus pinea Cupressus sempervirens Juniperus phoenicea Phoenician Juniper Juniperus oxycedrus Pistacia lentiscus Periwinkle Family
Nerium oleander Scattered in damp places. Gardens Ivy Family
Hedera helix Araucaria heterophylla Norfolk Island Pine Amaranth Family
Arthrocnemon Creeping Shrubby Arthrocnemon perenne Arthrocnemum fruticosum Beta vulgaris Caprobrotus Caprobrotus edulis var edulis Chenopodium Chenopodium bonus-henricus Naturetrek August 16
Tour Report
Scientific Names
English Names
Halimione Halimione portulacoides Mesambryanthemum Mesambryanthemum crystallinum Apium nodiflorum Fool's Watercress Crithmum maritimum Cap de Cavalleria Daucus carota Eryngium maritimum Foeniculum vulgare Ferula communis Kundmannia sicula Smymium olusatrum Vincetoxicum hirundinaria Cap de Cavalleria Daisy Family
Anthemis arvensis Anthemis maritima Asteriscus Astericus maritumus Cap de Cavalleria Bellium bellidioides** Bellis annua ssp annua Calendula Calendula arvensis Carlina corymbosa Clustered Thistle Carduus pycnocephalus Plymouth Thistle Carduus tenuiflorus Chrysanthemum Chrysanthemum coronarium var coronarium (Glebionis coronaria) Chrysanthemum coronarium var discolor Chrysanthemum segetum (Glebionis segetum) Cichorium Cichorium intybus Cirsium vulgare Cirsium arvense Creeping thistle Crepis vesicaria Dandelion Hawk's-beard Dittrichia Dittrichia viscosa ssp viscosa Evax pygmaea ssp pygmaea Galactites Boar Thistle / Milk Galactites tomentosa Hedypnois Hedypnois cretica Helechrysum Helechrysum ambiguum** Helechrysum stoechas ssp stoechas Shrubby Everlasting Naturetrek August 16
Tour Report
Scientific Names
English Names
Hyoseris radiata Perennial Hyoseris Hyoseris scabra Launaea cervicomis Hedgehog Lettuce Cap de Cavelllera Pallenis spinosa Phagnalon Phagnalon rupestre Cavalleria Beach Phagnalon saxatile Cavalleria Beach Pulicararia Pulicaria dysenterica Reichardia Reichardia tingitana Reichardia picroides Common Brighteyes Rhagadiolus Santolina Santolina chamaecyparissus Cavalleria Beach Senecio bicolour (int) Senecio rodriguezii Rodriguez's Ragwort Cap de Cavelllera Senecio vulgaris Silybum marianum Sonchus oleraceus Smooth Sow-thistle Sonchus tenerrimus Tragopogon Tragopogon hybridus Urospermum Urospermum dalechampii Borage Family
Anchusa azurea (Syn A. italica) Cala Tirtant / Fields Borago officinalis Cynoglossum creticum Blue Hound's-tounge Echium arenarium Coastal Viper's-bugloss Sandy ground nr the sea. Small-flowered Viper's- Echium parviflorum Echium plantagineaum Purple Viper's-bugloss Roadsides / Disturbed Ground Cabbage Family
Brassica rapa subspp oleifera Algendar Gorge at Cala Galdana Cardaria draba Algendar Gorge at Cala Galdana Cakile maritima Capsella bursa-pastoris Capsella rubella Pink Shepards-purse Diplotaxis Diplotaxis eurcoides White Wall Rocket Lobularia Lobularia maritima Raphanus raphanistrum subspp maritimus Rapistrum Rapistrum rugosum Sisymbrium Sisymbrium officinale Naturetrek August 16
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Scientific Names
English Names
Bellflower Family
Campanula erinus Small Bellflower Honeysuckle Family
Lonicera implexa Amongst shrubs in thickets Centranthus Centranthus calcitrapae Centranthus ruber Capparis spinosa The Pinks Family
Cerastium Cerastium glomeratum Sticky Mouse-ear Paronychia Petrorhagia nanteuillii Herniaria Herniara hirsuta Polycarpon Polycarpon polycarpiodes Purslane-leved Allseed Polycarpon alsinifolium Silene gallica Small flowered catchfly Silene secundiflora Silene sedoides Silene vulgaris Spergularia Spergulararia media Greater Sand-spury Spergularia rubra Spergularia marina Lesser Sand-spury Cistus albidus Grey-leaved Cistus Cistus creticus Cistus monspelliensis Montpellier Cistus Cistus salvifolius Sage-leaved Cistus Fumana thymifolia Thyme-leaved Rockrose Bindweed Family
Calystegia sepium Calystegia soldanella Convolvulus althaeoides Mallow-leaved Bindweed Convolvulus arvensis Ipomoea sagittata Stone Crop Family
Sedum rubens Sedum sediforme Umbilicus Umbilicus horizontalis Horizontal Navelwort Umbilicus rupestris Naturetrek August 16
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Scientific Names
English Names
Ecballium elaterium Squirting Cucumber Ephedra fragilis Heather Family
Arbutus unedo Erica arborea Erica multifora Many-flowered Heath Erica scoparia Spurge Family
Euphorbia Euphorbia characias Mediterranean Spurge Euphorbia dendroides Euphorbia helioscopia Euphorbia maresii * Euphorbia paralias Cap de Cavalleria Euphorbia segetalis Ricinus communis Castor-oil-plant Pea Family
Anthyllis Anthyllis histrix Cap de Cavalleria Anthyllis tetraphylla Astragalus Astragalus balearicus Balearic Milk-vetch Astragalus boeticus Yellow Milk-vetch Bituminaria Bituminaria bituminosa (Syn Psoralea bituminosa) Roadside to Algendar Gorge Calycotome Calicotome spinosa Coronilla Coronilla juncea Rush-like Scorpion Vetch Coronilla scorpiodies Dorycnium Dorycnium hirsutum Dorycnium fulgurans Dorycnium pentaphyllum Cavalleria Beach Hedysarum Hedysarum coronarium French Honeysuckle Lathryrus Lathyrus annus Lathyrus articulatus Lathyrus clymenum Lathyrus cicera Lathyrus ochrus Winged Vetchling Lathrus sphaericus Lathyrus tenuifolius ? Lotus corniculatus Bird's-foot-trefoil Lotus cytisoides Grey Bird's-foot-trefoil Cap de Cavalleria Lotus edulis Edible Bird's-foot-tefoil Lotus ornithopodiodes Southern Bird's-foot-trefoil Lotus parviflorus Hairy Bird's-foot-trefoil Four leafed Bird's-foot- Lotus tetraphyllus Cap de Cavalleria Naturetrek August 16
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Scientific Names
English Names
Lupinus micranthus Medicago arabica Medicago marina Medicago orbicularis Medicago polymorpha Medicago truncatula Melilotus Melilotus indica Small-flowered Melilot Ononis crispa Ononis minutissima Robinia pseudoacacia Scorpiurus Scorpiurus muricatus (S. subvillosus?) Caterpiller Plant Cap de Cavalleria Spartium junceum Trifolium Trifolium angustifolium Narrow-leafed Clover Trifolium camprestre Trifolium repens Trifolium resupinatum Trifolium scabrum Trifolium stellatum Trifolium tomentosum Vicia benghalensis Vicia lutea Vicia sativa Vicia tenussima Vicia pseudocracca Quercus ilex ssp ilex Sea Heath Family
Frankenia hirsuta Frankenia laevis Frankenia pulverulenta Annual Sea-heath Cap de Cavalleria Gentian Family
Blakstonia perfoliata spp grandiflora Blackstonia perfoliata spp perfoliata Blackstonia acuminata Centaurea erythreae Centaurium maritimum Centaurium tenuiflorum Slender Centuary Geranium Family
Erodium chium ssp chium Three-lobed Storks-bill Cap de Cavalleria Erodium cicutarium Common Stork's-bill Geranium columbinum Long-stalked Crane's-bill Geranium dissectum Cut-leaved Crane's-bill Cavalleria Beach Geranium molle Dove's--foot Crane's-bill Geranium purpureum Naturetrek August 16
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Scientific Names
English Names
Walnut Family
Juglans regia Mint Family
Ballota nigra Mentha aquatica Micromeria filiformis Prasium majus White Hedge-nettle Rosmarinus officinalis Salvia verbenaca Sideritis romana spp romana Stachys ocymastrum Italian Woundwort Cavalleria Beach Teucrium polium spp capitatum Teucrium subspinosum (syn T. capitatum spp majoricum)* Laural Family
Lauris nobilis Flax Family
Linum bienne Linum strictum Upright Yellow Flax Cavalleria Beach Linum trigynum Cavalleria Beach Mallow Family
Althaea officinalis Lavaterera arborea Malva sylvestris Malva parviflora Ficus carica Olive Family
Olea europea Cultivated fields / Scrub Phillyrea angustifolia Phillyrea media var rodriguezii Rodriguez's False Olive Phillyrea latifolia Green Olive Tree Broomrape Family
Bellardia trixago Mediterranean Linseed Misopates orontium Parentucellia viscosa Phelipanche Phelipanche mutelii (was Orobranche mutelii) Orobranche Orobranche minor Common Broomrape Orobranche crinita Veronica persica Common Field Speedwell Veronica cymbalaria Oxalis Family
Oxalis pes-caprae Bermuda Buttercup Poppy Family
Chlidonium Naturetrek August 16
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Scientific Names
English Names
Chelidonium majus Greater Celendine Glaucium flavum Yellow horned Poppy Papaver dubium Long Headed Poppy Papaver hybridum Papaver pinnatifidum Papaver rhoeas Common / Field Poppy Papaver somniferum Hypecoum imberoe Fumaria capreolata White Ramping-fumatory Fumaria officinalis Peony Family
Paeonia cambessedesii** Pittosporum Pittosporum tobira Plantain family
Cymbalaria muralis Ivy-leaved Toadflax Digitalis minor (syn D. dubia)** Balearic / Small Foxglove Plantago crassifolia Plantago coronopus Buck's-horn Plantain Plantago logapus Hare's-foot Plantain Plantago lanceolata Ribwort Plantain Sibthorpia Sibthorpia africana* Thrift Family
Limonium virgatum Cap de Cavalleria Limonium minutum* Dwarf Sea Lavender Cap de Cavalleria Dock Family
Polygonium Polygonium aviculare Common Knotgrass Polygonum maritimum Rumex bucephalophorus Rumex crispus ssp crispus Rumex obtusifolius Broad-leafed Dock Primrose Family
Scarlet Pimpernel (red Anagallis arvensis spp arvensis Cultivated / Disturbed ground form) Scarlet Pimpernel (blue Anagallis arvensis spp azurea Cultivated / Disturbed ground Coris monspeliensis Cavalleria Beach Lysimachia minoricensis* Cytinus hypocistis Naturetrek August 16
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Scientific Names
English Names
Buttercup Family
Clematus cirrhosa Early Virgins Bower Clemitus vitalba Ranunculus Ranunculus bulbosus Bulbous butercup Ranunculus macrophyllus Large leafed Buttercup Ranunculus muricatus Rough Fruited Buttercup Ranunculus peltatus Pond Water- Crowfoot Ranunculus sceleratus Celery-leafed Buttercup Ranunculus trichophyllus Mignonette Family
Reseda alba White Mignonette Reseda lutea Buckthorn Family
Rhamnus alternatus Mediteranian buckthorn Rose Family
Crataegus Crataegus monogyna Potentilla Potentilla reptans Creeping Cinquefoil Prunus duicis Rosa semperevirens Rubus ulmifolius Roadsides. Cala Tirant Sanguisorba Sanguisorba minor Bedstraw Family
Crucianella maritima Galium aparine Rubia peregrina Sharardia arvensis Grassy places / Field edges Valantia muralis Cap de Cavelllera Citrus limon Citrus sinensis Ailanthus altissima Figwort Family
Paulownia tomentosa Scrophularia auriculata Scrophularia peregrina Nettle-leaved Figwort Scrophularia canina spp ramosissima Verbascum creticum Glandular Mullein Verbascum sinuatum Wavy Leafed Mullein Tamarix gallica Naturetrek August 16
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Scientific Names
English Names
Tropaeolum Tropaeolum majus Elm Family
Ulmus minor Smooth-leafed Elm Parietaria judaica Pellitory-of-the-wall Common walls and rocks Urtica membranacea (syn dubia) Mediterranean Nettle Urtica urens Viola stolonifera Vitis vinifera Agave americana (int) Pancratium maritimum Lvs Only - Cala Tirant Arum Family
Arum pictum Cap de Cavalleria Arum italicum Arisarum vulgare Dracunculus muscivorus Cap de Cavalleria Zantedeschia aethioica (int) Cala Galdana (Algendar Gorge) Water Plaintain Family
Narrow leaved water Alisma lanceolatum Carex otrubae Eleocharis palustris Common Spike Rush Scirpoides holoschoenus Round-headed Clubrush Scirpus maritimus Tamus communis Iris Family
Gladiolus Gladiolus illyricus Gladiolus italicus Iris pseudoacorus Iris germanica Romulea columnae Cavalleria Beach Rush Family
Juncus acutus Juncus maritima Juncus inflexus Naturetrek August 16
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Scientific Names
English Names
Allium roseum var bulbiferum Allium triquetrum Three-cornered Leek Aloe maculata (int) Asparagus acutifolius Asparagus albus Asparagus stipularis Asphodelus aestivus Turkish Asphodel Asphodelus fistulosus Muscari comosum Ornithogalum arabicum Large Star-of-Bethlehem Ruscus aculeatus Smilax aspera Mediterranean Smilax Urginea maritima Orchid Family
Anacamptis pyramidalis Pyramidal Orchid Cap de Cavalleria Gymnadenia conopsea Limodorum abortivm Ophrys apifera Ophrys balearica Ophrys speculum Ophrys tenthredinifera Serapias lingua Serapias parviflora Small-flowered Serapis Grass Family
Aegilops geniculata Ammophila arenaria ssp arundinaceae Ampelodesmos mauritanica Mauritania-grass Anthoxanthum odoratum Sweet Vernal-grass Arundo donax Avena barbata Briza maxima Greater Quaking-grass Briza minor Lesser Quaking-grass Cynosurus echinatus Rough Dog's-tail Dactylis glomerata Desmazeria rigida Gastsidium ventricosum Hordeum murinum Lagurus ovatus Lamarchia aurea Lophochloa cristata Melica ciliata Phragmites australis Posidonia oceanica Lvs at high tide mark on beaches Typha dominngensis Southern Reedmace Naturetrek August 16

Source: https://www.naturetrek.co.uk/reports_new/ESP04_report_160422_Menorca.pdf

Microsoft word - factsheet_menstruation.docx

SWS FACT SHEET The Menstrual Cycle: A Feminist Lifespan Perspective Prepared by the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research www.menstruationresearch.org I. Introduction A. Why Menstruation Matters The Menstrual Cycle is one of the most important biological differences between females and males, one that has been used – in many contexts — to justify discrimination against women and girls. Thus, the more clearly we understand the biological and social significance of the menstrual cycle for both women and men, the better we understand the fundamental arrangements of human society. Challenging the shame and secrecy surrounding the menstrual cycle, encourages embodied consciousness, or a more meaningful and complex appreciation of bodies across the lifespan. Interdisciplinary menstrual cycle research, especially studies that explore the psychosocial dimensions of menstruation in diverse cultural settings, is an emerging subfield. Some menstrual activists and menstrual cycle researchers refer to "menstruators" instead of women when referring to those who menstruate. This linguistic choice locates menstruation beyond the confines of gender as socially constructed and expresses solidarity with women who do not menstruate (due to illness, age or some aspect of their physiology) and transgender men and genderqueer individuals who do in spite of their gender identity. Refusing to assume who does and does not menstruate is one way of challenging the rigid gender binary that perpetuates privilege and oppression (Bobel, 2010). B. How the Menstrual Cycle Works Most menstrual cycles are 21-35 days long but variability is common after menarche (the first period) and also before menopause. Each menstrual cycle is created by a unique egg and its surrounding cells; these produce hormones under careful feedback control by brain and pituitary hormones. A usual menstrual cycle begins with 2-6 days of vaginal blood loss (called a "period" or "flow") as the uterine lining is shed. Whole period blood loss averages 8 soaked regular menstrual products (40 ml) (Hallberg, Hogdahl, Nillson, & Rybo, 1966). Despite cultural concepts of regularity, a third of women, once a year have a period two weeks early or late (Munster, Schmidt and Helm, 1992). From low levels during flow, estrogen rises to a midcycle peak over 9-20 days. Next, a pituitary Luteinizing Hormone (LH) peak triggers the release of an egg (ovulation). Following ovulation, progesterone production rises steeply while estrogen decreases minimally (Nielsen, Brixen, Bouillon, & Mosekilde, 1990) until both decrease at the next flow. The luteal (post-ovulation) phase normally lasts 10-14 days (Vollman, 1977) but ovulatory disturbances are common (Bedford 2010). C. Menstrual Attitudes & Representations Though menstruation is a biological reality, culture-bound values shape its meaning and management. Though there is not a comprehensive cross-cultural comparison of menstruation, anthropologists have reported extensively on various cultural practices surrounding menstruation ranging from severe social restriction to special respect and privilege for menstruating women (Mead, 1949; Shuttle & Redgrove, 2005; Knight, 1991). In most cultures, menarche (the onset of menstruation) is viewed as differentiating males and females. Though uncommon, artistic and cultural menstrual references exist, such as bleeding wounds (in crucifixion or Dracula) (Mulvey-Roberts, 1998) or wolf bites in fairy tales (Bettelheim, 1976). In cinema, as early as 1966, To Sir with Love used a menstrual detail to test the protagonist's manhood, and more recently Superbad (2007) and No Strings Attached (2011) offered more subtle explorations of male responses to menstrual encounters. Meanwhile, novelists such as William Faulkner, Joyce Carol Oates, Erica Jong and Philip Roth and Stephen King (who exploited menstruation in the horror genre), included menstrual content. Artists such as Vanessa Tiegs and Judy Chicago used menstrual blood and menstrual products, respectively, to challenge menstrual silence and secrecy. In contemporary advertising venues, menstruation is most often coupled with dominant and recurring themes of secrecy and concern for restrictions on physical and social activity. In advertisements for drugs marketed for menstrual discomfort, the menstrual cycle is treated as a "hygienic crisis" (Brumberg, 1997), a medical condition, and a "problem" or malady requiring treatment (Tavris, 1992; Angier, 1999; Ussher, 2006; Vostral, 2008). One recent study, however, suggests that teen girls use their menstrual experiences as a "source of power" in their interactions with other girls as well as boys (Fingerson, 2006).

ibc7.net

Open Access REPORT ON NEGATIVE RESULT Bacterial Hash Function Using DNA-Based XOR Logic Reveals Unexpected Behavior of the LuxR PromoterBrianna Pearson1,‡, Kin H. Lau1,‡, Alicia Al en2, James Barron1,3, Robert Cool2, Kel y Davis4, Wil DeLoache1, Erin Feeney1, Andrew Gordon2, John Igo5, Aaron Lewis5, Kristi Muscalino4, Madeline Parra4, Pal avi Penumetcha1, Victoria G. Rinker1,6,