Ogni antibiotico è efficace in relazione a un determinato gruppo di microrganismi comprare amoxil senza ricettain caso di infezioni oculari vengono scelte gocce ed unguenti.

Ci.watauga.tx.us

City of Watauga 2015 Drinking Water Quality Report
Public Works Department (817) 514-5843
Our Drinking Water Meets or Exceeds All Federal (EPA) Requirements
The City of Watauga is dedicated to providing safe and Public Participation Opportunity
reliable drinking water to its customers. This report is a summary of the quality of the water the City of Watauga July 7, 2016
provides our customers. The analysis was made by 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
using the data from the most recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) required tests and is Location:
Public Works Department
presented in the following information. We hope this (817) 514-5843
information helps you become more knowledgeable about what's in your drinking water. Where do we get our drinking water?
Special Notice for the ELDERLY, INFANTS,
Our drinking water is obtained from surface water CANCER PATIENTS, People with HIV/AIDS
resources. The sources of our drinking water come or Other Immune Problems:
from Fort Worth. They include Lake Bridgeport, Eagle Mountain Lake, Lake Worth, Lake Benbrook, Cedar Creek Reservoir and Richland-Chambers Reservoir. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants TCEQ wil be reviewing all of Texas' drinking water in drinking water than the general population. Immuno- sources. It is important to protect your drinking water by compromised persons such as persons with cancer protecting your water source. undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or About the following pages
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These The pages that follow list all of the federally regulated or people should seek advice about drinking water from monitored constituents, which have been found in your their health care providers. EPA/Centers for Disease drinking water. U.S. EPA requires water systems to test Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines on appropriate up to 97 constituents. means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Secondary Constituents
Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791. Many constituents such as calcium, sodium, or iron City of Watauga Drinking Water Quality
which are often found in drinking water, can cause taste, color and odor problems. The taste and odor The City of Watauga drinking water is regulated by the constituents are called secondary constituents and are Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). regulated by the State of Texas, not EPA. These The City did not list any water quality violations on the constituents are not causes for health concerns. 2015 Water Quality Report because there were none. Therefore, secondary constituents are not required to The City of Watauga has a Superior Water System be reported in this document, but they may greatly rating as designated by TCEQ since 1999. Inspections affect the appearance and taste of your water. on the water system are made by TCEQ. Water quality is monitored by the City's Utility Division on a monthly ALL drinking water may contain contaminants
basis. For more information, call (817) 514-5843. When drinking water meets federal standards, there may not be any health-based benefits to purchasing bottled water or point of use devices. Drinking water, En Español
including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. Este reporte incluye informacion importante sobre la The presence of contaminants does not necessarily agua para tomar. Si tiene preguntas o discusiones indicate that water poses a health risk. More information sobre este reporte en español, favor de llamar al tel. about contaminants and potential health effects can be (817) 514-5838 para hablar con una persona bilingue obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791. Water Sources
TCEQ Assessed Source Water
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the conducted a source water assessment of our water surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves supply lakes. The Fort Worth water system was naturally occurring minerals, and, in some cases, determined to be susceptible to some contaminants, radioactive material. It can pick up substances resulting using criteria developed by TCEQ in its federally from the presence of animals or from human activity. approved source water assessment program. Contaminants that may be present in source water The assessment report consists of maps showing the contaminants, and organic chemical contaminants. assessment area, an inventory of known land use activities of concern and documentation of specific contaminants of concern. This report is available by contacting the Fort Worth Water Department office at Definitions and Abbreviations Used in Tables
1000 Throckmorton St. in Fort Worth Texas or the Trinity River Authority at 11201 Trinity Boulevard in The following definitions should help in understanding the abbreviations used in the charts. Fort Worth uses surface water from – Lake Bridgeport, Action Level - The concentration of a contaminant that,
Eagle Mountain Lake, Lake Worth, Benbrook Lake, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements Cedar Creek Reservoir, Richland Chambers Reservoir that a water system must follow. and the Clear Fork Trinity River. Fort Worth owns Lake Worth. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is MCLMaximum Contaminant Level - The highest
responsible for Benbrook Lake. The other four lakes level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. are owned and operated by Tarrant Regional Water MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using District (TRWD). the best available treatment technology. Fort Worth monitors water quality in Lake Worth and MRDL - Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level - The
participates with TRWD to ensure the other lakes are highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. regularly tested. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial TCEQ is currently updating the assessments.
MRDLG – Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
What's in the water?
Goal – The level of a drinking water disinfectant below,
which there is no known or expected health risk. The following charts list the contaminants that require MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of monitoring or are regulated and were detected in Fort disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. Worth and Watauga water. The data included is from calendar year 2015 unless otherwise indicated. NTU – Nephelometric Turbidity Units are used to
measure water turbidity or clarity.
PCi/L - Picocuries per liter is a measure of radioactivity
in water.
ppb – Parts per billion; equivalent to micrograms per
liter. (mg/L)
ppm – Parts per million; equivalent to milligrams per
liter. (mg/L)
TT (Treatment Technique) – A required process
intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking
water.
MCLG – Maximum Contaminant Level Goal - the
level of a contaminant in drinking water below which
there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs
allow for a margin of safety.

ND - None Detected
.
CITY OF WATAUGA 2015 DATA
Regulated at the Customer's Tap
# of Sites
Common Sources of
90th percentile
Contaminant
exceeding
Substance in
Action Level
Drinking Water
Corrosion of household Action Level=.015 plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits Corrosion of household Action Level=1.3 plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits 90th percentile value: 90% of the samples were at or below this value. EPA considers the 90th percentile value the same as an "average" value for other contaminants. Lead and copper are regulated by a treatment technique that requires systems to control the corrosiveness of their water. If more than 10% of tap water samples exceed the action level, water systems must take additional steps. The test results shown above are from 2015. The next monitoring will occur in 2016. Regulated in the Distribution System
Common Sources of Substance
Watauga's
Ideal Goal
Contaminant
Allowed (MCL)
Detections
Drinking Water
Haloacetic Acids By-product of drinking water By-product of drinking water Coliforms are naturally present in the environment as well as feces; fecal coliforms and E Coli only come from human and animal Maximum Residual Disinfection Level
Constituent
Detection
(low-high)
Disinfectant used to control "City of Watauga's Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR 3) Information"
Data gathering to determine if more regulation needed
Water utilities in the United States monitor for more than 100 contaminants and must meet 91 regulations for water safety and quality. But should other contaminates be regulated? The 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act amendments require that once every five years EPA issue a new list of no more than 30 unregulated contaminants to be monitoring by public water systems. This monitoring provides a basis for future regulatory actions to protect public health. The third Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule includes assessment for 21 chemical contaminants, 7 hormones and two viruses. The virus testing did not impact the City of Watauga. This testing was limited to small groundwater systems that do not disinfect. UCMR benefits the environment and public health by providing EPA and other interested parties with scientifically valid data on the occurrence of these contaminants in drinking water. Health information is necessary to know whether these contaminants pose a health risk. Public water systems will sample for these contaminants for four consecutive quarters from 2013 to 2015. City of Watauga's sampling occurred from February 2014 through November 2014. Contaminant
Common Sources of Substances
Detections
Naturally-occurring elemental metal; used as vanadium pentoxide which is a chemical intermediate and a catalyst Naturally-occurring element found in ores and present in plants, animals and bacterial; commonly used form molybdenum trioxide used as a chemical reagent Naturally-occurring element; historically, commercial use of strontium has been in the faceplate class of cathode-ray tube televisions to block x-ray emissions Naturally-occurring element; used in making steel and other alloys; chromium-3 or -6 forms are used for chrome plating, dyes and pigments, leather tanning, and wood preservation. Total Chromium, the sum of chromium in all its valence states, is already regulated in drinking water. As part of
UCMR 3, EPA requires testing for Total Chromium in the same samples used to test for Chromium 6, which is on the
UCMR 3 list. The value differs from what is listed in the other table because of different sampling periods. The MCL for
EPA's current total chromium regulation was determined based upon the health effects of Chromium 6.
UCMR 3 contaminants not detected
Chemicals
1,2,3-trichloropropane perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS)
1,3-butadiene perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA)
chloromethane (methyl chloride) perfluorobutanesulfonic acid (PFBS)
bromomethane Hormones
chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) 17-β-estradiol
Bromochloromethane (Halon 1011) 17-α-ethynylestradiol
1,4-dioxane estriol
cobalt equilin
perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) estrone
perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) testosterone
perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) 4-androstene-3,17-dione
chlorate
2015 Water loss Data
The City of Watauga had an estimated water loss of 40,869,972 gallons (6.17) % of water purchased).
This loss is contributed to leaks, breaks, theft and inaccuracy of meters.

Trinity River Authority of Texas Tarrant County Water Supply Project – Regulated Contaminants
Inorganic Contaminants
Collection
Contaminant
Source of Contaminant
Detected
Discharge of drilling waste; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories Runoff from fertilizer use; leaking from septic tanks, sewage, erosion of natural deposits Range of Levels
Contaminant
Source of Contaminant
Detected
By-product of drinking water *Compliance is based on Running Average of monthly averages for Bromate at the end of each quarter, which was less than the 5 ppb for each quarter in 2015 Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of water. It is a good indicator of the effectiveness of the filtration system.
Lowest Monthly %
Highest Single
Turbidity
Contaminant
of Samples
Units of Measure
Source of Contaminant
Measurement
Meeting Limits
Fort Worth Water Quality Data Report 2015
Common Sources of
Contaminant
2015 Level
Substance in Drinking Water
Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural Decay of natural and man-made deposits of certain minerals that Beta particles & are radioactive and may emit forms Photon emitters 2
of radiation known as photon and beta radiation Water additive which promotes strong teeth; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum Runoff from fertilizer use; leaking from Nitrate (measured septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural Runoff from fertilizer use; leaking from Nitrite3 (measured septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural By-product of drinking water disinfection Haloacetic Acids By-product of drinking water disinfection By-product of drinking water disinfection Coliforms are naturally present in the environment as well as feces; fecal (including fecal coliforms and E Coli only come from coliform & E Coli) human and animal fecal waste. Turbidity 1
samples <0.3 NTU Common Sources of
Substance in Drinking Water
Naturally occurring 1 Because Fort Worth historically has had low levels of metals in its water, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ)
requires this monitoring occur only once every six years. The test results shown above are from 2010. The next monitoring will occur in
2016.
2 Because Fort Worth historically has had low levels of radionuclides in its water, TCEQ requires this monitoring occur only once every
three years. The test results shown above are from 2013. The next monitoring will occur in 2016.
3 Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of water. It is monitored because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of the filtration
system.
4 Total Organic Carbon is used to determine disinfection by-product precursors. Fort Worth was in compliance with all monitoring and
treatment technique requirements for disinfection by-product precursors.
Unregulated Contaminants
Common Sources of
Contaminant
Detections
Substance in Drinking Water
By-product of drinking water disinfection By-product of drinking water disinfection; Bromodichloromethane not regulated individually; included in Total Dibromochloromethane By-product of drinking water disinfection; Dichloroacetic Acid not regulated individually; included in Haloacetic Trichloroacetic Acid
Microorganism testing shows low detections in raw water
Tarrant Regional Water District monitors the raw water at all intake sites for Cryptosporidium, Giardia Lamblia and viruses. The source
is human and animal fecal waste in the watershed. The 2015 sampling showed low level detections of Cryptosporidium, Giardia
Lamblia and viruses that are common in surface water. The table below indicates when detections were found in each raw water
source.
Cryptosporidium and Giardia Lamblia monitoring is done monthly. Virus monitoring is performed four times a year in January, March,
July and September. Viruses are treated through disinfection processes. Cryptosporidium and Giardia Lamblia are removed through a
combination of disinfection and / or filtration.
Intake Location
Giardia Lamblia
Adenovirus
Astrovirus
Rotavirus
Richland Chambers
Not detected
Not detected
Not detected
Not detected
Not detected
Reservoir
Cedar Creek Lake

Not detected
Not detected
January, March
Not detected
Not detected
Not detected
Lake Benbrook
Not detected
Not detected
January, March
Not detected
Not detected
Not detected
Eagle Mountain
September
Not detected
Not detected
Lake
Lake Worth

Not detected
Not detected
January, March
Not detected
Not detected
Not detected
Clearfork of Trinity
Not detected
January, March
Not detected
Not detected
Not detected

TCEQ accesses raw water supplies for susceptibility
Fort Worth uses surface water from Lake Worth, Eagle Mountain Lake,
Lake Bridgeport, Richland Chambers Reservoir, Cedar Creek Reservoir,
Lake Benbrook and the Clear Fork Trinity River.
Fort Worth owns Lake Worth. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for Benbrook Lake. The other four lakes are owned and operated by Tarrant Regional Water District. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality completed an assessment of Fort Worth's source waters. TCEQ classified the risk to our source waters as high for most contaminants. High susceptibility means there are activities near the source water a or watershed make it very likely that chemical constituents may come into contact with the source water. It does not mean that there are any health risks present. Tarrant Regional Water District, from which Fort Worth purchases its water, received the assessment reports. For more information on source water assessments and protection efforts at our system, contact Stacy Walters at 817-392-8203. Further details about the source-water assessments are available at dww2.tceq.texas.gov/DWW/JSP/SWAP.jsp?tinwsys_is_number=5802&tinwsys_ st_code=TX&wsnumber=TX2200012%20%20%20&DWWState=TX.

Source: http://www.ci.watauga.tx.us/waterqualityreport

Absorption spectra and aqueous photochemistry of -hydroxyalkyl nitrates of atmospheric interest

Molecular Physics, 2015Vol. 113, Nos. 15–16, 2179–2190, Absorption spectra and aqueous photochemistry of β-hydroxyalkyl nitrates of atmospheric Dian E. RomonoskLucas Q. NguyDorit Tran B. NguyScott A. EDavid B.C. Mar Christopher D. VanderwaR. Benny Gand Sergey A. Nizkorodov aDepartment of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; bFritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics, The Hebrew

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La disfunción eréctil (la mal llamada "impotencia") se define como la incapacidad para obtener una erección suficiente para completar una relación sexual satisfactoria. Esto incluye tanto la imposibilidad de conseguir una erección (disfunción eréctil total), como las dificultades para mantenerla durante un cierto tiempo o en determinadas posturas (disfunción eréctil parcial).