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The 9th asian raptor research and conservation network (arrcn) symposium 2015, novotel chumphon beach resort and golf, chumphon, thailand; october 21–25, 2015

The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Organized by
Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN)
Chumphon Province
The Flyway Foundation, Thailand
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Co-organized by
Ministry of Tourism and Sports Tourism Authority of Thailand Thai Tourism Promotion Association (TTPA) Thailand Convention and Exhibition Bureau Kasetsart University Mahidol University National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA) Silpakorn University King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi Kasem Bundit University Bird Conservation Society of Thailand (BCST) The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Organizing Committee
Head of Committee Committee and secretary Assistant Professor.Dr.Sutsan Suttipisan Scientific Committee
Head of Committee Committee and secretary Associate Professor.Philip D. Round Associate Professor.Dr.George Andrew Gale Associate Professor.Dr.Worawidh Wajjwalku Assistant Professor.Dr.Sutsan Suttipisan Dr.Gombobaatar Sundev The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
The organizing Committee of the 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network Symposium 2015, Chumphon, Thailand would like to express their sincere gratitude to the individuals and organization. Thanks to our volunteers (undergraduate students from Kasetsart University, Kasem Bundit University and etc.) for their help. Finally, the Keynote Speakers, Session Chairs, al presenters and Participants for having made this symposium possible. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Program Overview
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015, Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015 Day 1 (Wednesday 21 October 2015)
Arrival at Chumphon, Thailand Day 2 (Thursday 22 October 2015)
Registration, Poster set up, Slide loading and booking for Morning birdwatching tour on next day. Introduction to ARRCN Symposium of Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort & Opening Speech from Mr.Somdee Kashayongyeen Governor of Chumphon province Opening Speech from Assoc. Prof Chavanee Tongroach Vice Minister for Tourism and Sports Opening Speech from Dr.Toru Yamazaki President of ARRCN Opening Ceremony Session 1
Keynote Speaker
"World Class, Face to Face"
Chair: Associate Professor. Professor Ian Newton The Ecology of Raptor Migration 11:00 – 11:30
Coffee break
and Poster presentation
Professor Yossi Leshem Migrating Birds Know No Boundaries" From a Local to Global Scale The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
12:30 – 13:30
The Movement Ecology of Scavenging Dr.Keith L. Bildstein Birds of Prey: Examples from the Americas and Africa Mr.Tatsuyoshi Murate The result of the ARRCN Collaborative Research Project of Migratory Raptors 15:00 – 15:20
Coffee break
and Poster presentation
Session 2
Current raptor conservation in Asia
At small meeting room Chair: Dr.Chuenchom Hansasuta
Current raptor conservation in Thailand Current raptor conservation in India (Adam) A.Supriatna Current raptor conservation in Current raptor conservation in Japan Current raptor conservation in Gombobaatar Sundev Current raptor conservation in Current raptor conservation in Nepal Current raptor conservation in Current raptor conservation in Current raptor conservation in South Current raptor conservation in Taiwan The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
19:00 – 21:30
Welcome Party at Plenary hall on
second floor
of Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort
& Golf Club.
Day 3 (Friday 23 October 2015)
Chulalongkorn Day (a public holiday to commemorate King Chulalongkorn (Rama V)) Morning Bird Watching tour 5 USD Booking for Optional Dinner. Session 3
Conservation, Disease and Pollution
Plenary hall on second floor of Novotel Chair: Yuda Pramana Application of ectoparasiticide for Colpocephalum turbinatum control in captive Barn Owl The used of Barn Owl (Tyto alba) as rats control at rice-field in Yogyakarta Secondary poisoning risks of anticoagulant rodenticides to barn owls in agricultural areas in Malaysia – A review Lucia Liu Severinghaus The diet of Black-winged Kite (Elanus caeruleus) in Eastern Taiwan Md Lutfor Rahman Raptor electrocution at medium voltage power lines: a case study in Mongolia Randa, Bintang Rantau Conservation of the Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) in Beypazari, Ankara, Turkey Il egal hunting and feather use of Mountain Hawk-Eagles by local people in Southern The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
10:45 – 11:00
Coffee break and Poster
Session 4
Taxonomy and Genetic session
Plenary hall on second floor of Novotel Chair: Wichyanan Limparungpatthanakij Plumage polymorphism in Oriental First publishing Brown Hawk-Owl (Ninox scutulata ) in Kondang Merak, East Java, Relative abundance and Morphometric Michael S. Sanchez of the Philippine Scops Owl, Otus megalotis megalotis (Walden) in Mt. Makiling and Marinduque, Philippines The Phylogenetic Study of The White- (Haliaeetus leucogaster) Based on DNA Barcoding Cytochrome-C Oxcidace Sub Unit I Vocal Individuality of Sunda Scops Owl (Otus lempiji) in Peninsular Malaysia Session 5
Parallel Sessions
Environmental Issues and Related
Small meeting room on first floor of Novotel Chumphon Chair: Asst.Prof. Dr.Sutsan Suttipisan and Dr.Supaporn Prasongthan Nattaya Chanvithee Green Marketing in Hotel Industry, The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
The Awareness Reinforce Process through Raptor Migration observation Chalit Chiabphimai (Hawk Mountain of Asia), Chumphon, 12:30 – 13:30
Side Event
Think Global, Do Local
Meeting with local touring guide, Keynote Speakers teachers and students from Primary and Secondary School of Chumphon with Session 6
Migration and Wintering Session
Plenary hall on second floor of Novotel Chair: Andrew J. Pierce (Adam) A. Supriatna Status and conservation of migratory raptors in Indonesia Identification of Raptor Migration Routes in the Philippines Asman Adi Purwanto Raptor Migration in Gunung Ciremai - Preliminary Observation during 2014 Spring Migration Season- Distribution mapping of Accipiter soloensis and Butastur indicus based on occurrence data in Philippines Long-term raptor migration & illegal hunting monitoring along Eastern Black Sea flyway in Coffee break
15:15 – 15:30
and Poster presentation
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Khao Dinsor: a key site for monitoring Limparungpatthanakij raptor migration in the Indochinese Peninsula Autumn passage of migratory raptors over Taiping, Perak, Peninsular Malaysia 2000 – 2010: species and seasonality Apparent Human-induced Migration of Richard P. Reading Cinereous Vultures (Aegypius monachus) from Mongolia to the Republic of Korea The important of small islands for stopover site during migration of Oriental Honey Buzzards in Indonesia Yera putri rahayu The development of raptor migration a conservation objective at Rupat Island, Sumatra, Indonesia Session 7
Parallel Sessions
Reproduction, Habitat and Behavior
Small meeting room on first floor of Novotel Chumphon Chair: Dr.Gombobaatar Sundev Dennis I. Salvador Hope for Threatened Tropical Forest Lessons from the Philippine Eagle Conservation Program Population Status and Distribution of (Milvus migrans) in Sambhal District, Uttar Pradesh, India The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Impact of Upcoming Tourism and Running Railway Tract on Vultures in Deogarh, Lalitpur, Uttar Pradesh, India Saving the Last Forest of Kondang Merak using Raptor and Habitat Conservation through Ethnography, Ecotourism, Edutourism, and Soft Gombobaatar Sundev Ground nesting raptors of Mongolia Trophic ecology of sympatric Northern (Ninox japonica) and Oriental Scops Owls (Otus sunia) 15:00 – 15:30
Coffee break
and Poster presentation
First record of nests and breeding success of Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus) and implementation of Vulture Conservation Programs in Behavioral assessment methods to Inge H.M. Tielen identify the degree of habituation in Post-fledging movements and survival Md Lutfor Rahman of juvenile Saker Falcons (Falco cherrug) from artificial and natural nest sites in Mongolia Abundance of Spotted Wood Owl (Strix seloputo) in Relation to Environmental Factors in Malaysian Oil Palm Small The current conditions of Javan-Hawk Eagle's habitat remnants in West Java, The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current Status of Breeding Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Dispersal behavior of young Tawny Fish Owls at Wulin, Taiwan Regular Dinner at Lui Restaurant 5
19:00 – 21:30
mins walk from Novotel Chumphon
Beach Resort & Golf Club and back
to your accommodation.
Optional program
 Thai's crabs and seafood 40 seats only  Dinner at Night Market in (600 bahts/person) Chumphon City (pay by your own) Day 4 (Saturday 24 October 2015)
07:00 – 16:00
Field trips to Khao Dinsor
Optional
Barn Owl Conservation
Side Event
At Chumphon Palm Oil Industry
The Past, Present
and Future
Research and Conservation of Barn Owls in Indonesia Barn Owl Repopulation and Greangsak Hamarit, Reintroduction for Rat Control in Benchapol Lorsunyalak, Barn Owl Conservation Activity and Public Awareness In Thailand At Plenary hall on second floor of
19:00 – 22:00 Bazaar and Farewell
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort &
Golf Club.
Day 5 (Sunday 25 October 2015)
Post-Symposium Tour The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Poster session

Akalak kunsorn

A preliminary study of food habits of wintering circus harrier in Thailand Anita gamauf
Habitat requirements of raptor communities in continental S and SE Asia: the importance of protected high quality forests Dr. J. P. Baxi
A field study on vegetation of Washim district of Maharashtra state, India with special emphasis to raptor's habitat Gombobaatar sundev
-Daily activity of breeding Amur Falcons (Falco amurensis) in Hustai National park, -Breeding biology of Amur Falcons (Falco amurensis) in Hustai National park, Mongolia Facebook as media for raptor illegal trade in Indonesia Krishna prasad bhusal
Ecological monitoring of four species of Vultures for five years in Arghakhanchi, Nepal Adrian m. Constantino
Project northern light 2013-14: identifying spring migration exit points in Northern Luzon, Philippines Maria katrina c. Constantino
Project southern crossing 2014: first observations of autumn raptor migration at Sarangani, Mindanao Island, Philippines Oliver gray-read
Current population status and conservation interventions for three species of critically endangered vulture in Cambodia Yu-cheng hsu
Satellite tracking of Common Buzzards (Buteo buteo) banded on Kinmen Island, Taiwan Yung-kun huang
The movement and habitat use of juvenile Mountain Hawk-Eagle in Southern Taiwan. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Abstract
Plenary Talk
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Keynote speaker session "World class, face to face" THE BIOLOGY OF RAPTOR MIGRATION
Ian Newton
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Benson Lane, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, OX1 8BB, United Kingdom. Email: ine@ceh.ac.uk
This talk wil be mainly concerned with the general biology of bird migration, emphasizing the special features of raptor migration. Comparisons wil be drawn between the migration behavior of soaring raptors and the migrations of other birds which travel mainly by flapping flight. Migration in birds can be regarded as an adaptation to avoid seasonal food-shortages on breeding areas. With increasing latitude, as winters become more severe, increasing proportions of breeding birds migrate southward for the winter. Among raptors, species which feed mainly on birds or mammals migrate shorter distances than species that eat cold-blooded prey, such as fish, amphibians, reptiles and insects. These latter species winter mainly in tropical regions, where these prey types remain active year-round. In ideal conditions, soaring raptors and other birds can travel on migration more rapidly and more efficiently (at lower energy cost) than other birds that travel by flapping flight. Northern species that migrate to the tropics travel more rapidly than species that travel shorter distances, as shown by radio-tracing studies. Methods of studying migration wil be discussed, including the use of leg rings, observations by eye and by radar, and radio-tracking, and some examples of recent satellite-based radio-tracking wil be discussed.
Keywords: migration, raptor, evolution, soaring flight
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Keynote speaker session "World class, face to face" What satellite tracking Turkey Vultures and Hooded Vultures
has taught me about raptor movement ecology and conservation
Keith L. Bildstein,
Sarkis Acopian Director of Conservation Science, Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, USA My colleagues and I have been tracking the widespread and abundant Turkey Vulture in the Americas since 2003. So far, we have followed the movements of 57 Turkey Vultures breeding in Pennsylvania, Arizona, Minnesota, and the Pacific Northwest, USA; Saskatchewan, Canada; and La Pampa, and Rio Negro, Argentina. We have discovered strong migration connectivity in some, but not al populations, remarkable winter site- fidelity in al populations, vastly different speeds of migratory travel among populations, considerable differences in home range sizes among individuals within and among populations, and indications of minimal migratory flight costs and nighttime torpor among migrants. Al migratory vultures overwintered in areas with existing resident populations. One individual that was tracked for 11 years shifted from short-distance migratory behavior to sedentary behavior, and several individuals migrated along different tracks in different years. Overal , migration in Turkey Vultures has proved to be a far more complex "behavioral tool" than anticipated. My colleagues and I have tracked the widespread but globally endangered Hooded Vulture in Africa since 2013. So far we have followed the movements of 17 Hooded Vultures breeding in The Gambia, Ethiopia, and South Africa. We have discovered considerable differences in home-range size among non-migratory populations in West Africa, East Africa, and South Africa, as wel as considerable individual differences in home-range size within the three geographic populations, with birds in dense populations having smaller home ranges than those in sparse populations. We also have seen tracked vultures avoid areas where poaching has eradicated populations of large mammals. Although stil in its infancy, satellite tracking offers the "holy grail" for both raptor movement ecology and raptor conservation: the opportunity to follow individual birds of prey on a daily or even hourly basis, throughout both their long-distance migrations and their short-distance ranging flights. As miniaturization proceeds and costs decline, and as collaborative efforts among scientists and conservationists grow, this emerging technology promises to play an increasingly important role in both raptor movement ecology and raptor The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Oral Presentation
Current raptor Conservation
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current Raptor Conservation in Thailand (2012 – 2015)
Chukait Nualsri
The Flyway Foundation, Thailand The activity of Raptor watching in Thailand had seem to motive bird watchers al over Thailand which they had searched significant ecological site for observing the raptor migration seriously. Mostly seeking activity had been done by the smal group of volunteers which love and enjoy to observe the raptor migration. The raptor migration observation has been changed considerably since 2012. According to various and strong activities to develop the conservation of raptors in Thailand. Those activities been not only promoted and supported but also investigated and collected data moreover protected and prevented as wel as described as follow. Promotion and Supporting Activities
The founding to organisation support funding. There are some group of people who intended to support by founding the organisation in order to manage and administrate systematically. The founding of The Flyway Foundation was contributed. The objective of this organisation has received charity fund and provided funding to observation raptor counter voluntaries in Thailand. The first donation to found this foundation were Mr. Nurak Israsena and Mr. Edmund W.Pease. Moreover both of them would pay additional of one half whenever any donation to the Flyway Foundation. The operation of the Flyway Foundation has been operated in the second years under the operation of Mrs. Chunchom Hansatsut as the president. World class acknowledge in 2013, A textbook name "Migration Hotspots, The World's Best Migration Sites" was published by The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), UK, it explore raptor watching activities in Thailand since 2002 which endorsed and guaranteed Khao Dinsor, Patew District, Chumphon Province, Southern of Thailand as one of the best spot to observe raptor migration in the world. The Raptor and Wild bird Rehabilitation Center (Wild Bird Care, KU) was established on 2014 by Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University. The Wild Bird Care, KU was formed by Thai's bird watchers and Kasetsart University launched the charity activity to get the donation from public to construct the Special Animal Hospital and Rehabilitation Center in order to cure raptors and other wild birds. The project has been operated very wel . Investigation and data collection,
As some groups and organisations have been working in this project to collect data of raptors in Thailand continuously. Raptors counter has been working under the groups of people which can give some example as follow. Lanna Bird and Nature Conservation Club The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
has been incorporation from bird watchers in Chiang Mai Province, Northern of Thailand. The observation site of this club is located at the Wat Phra Tard Doi Kham. The significant is it is best spot for observed Amur Falcons (Falco amurensis) which fly over this area heading west to Myanmar and then Africa. Another one is Thai Raptor Group (TRG), which is study the raptors at two sites. One of the sites is Kho Radar located at Bang Saphan Noi District, Prachubkirikhan Province, Southern of Thailand which is approximate 50 kilometers north from Kho Dinsor, Chumphon province. It is a site to observe the raptor toward Malay Peninsula of autumn migration. Moreover, this group also observes the Black-eared Kite (Milvus Lineatus) at Pak Phli District, Nakhon Nayok Province, Eastern This year 2015, The Flyway Foundation are hiring raptor watchers to count and observe for ful autumn migration since early September to mid-November. And The Flyway Foundation also received cooperation from government agency, The Wildlife Conservation Office, Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP). The report wil post on Facebook of The Flyway Foundation. The Raptor Banding or Ringing at Kho Dinsor which has been permitted by the Wildlife Conservation Office, Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP) since 2011 – 2015. The data was collected from approximate 200 raptors for examples; Japanese Sparrowhawk (Accipiter gularis), Chinese Sparrowhawk (Accipiter soloensis), Shikra (Accipiter badius) and Black Baza (Aviceda leuphotes). Hopefully in 2016, we wrote proposal to looking for supporting the satellite tracking of raptors for 10 units. Prevention and protection,
More and more difficult from social network especial y Facebook and Line application. They are convenience and easy for raptor buyers to access wildlife treading which are increasing yearly. The black market for raptors was watched and tracked by Natural Resources and Environmental Crime Suppression Division. As the officer to arrest raptor hunters. At this point, Thailand has not al owing anyone keep native raptors as pets by law. As above activities in Thailand is not the efficient drive to conserve raptors but the less awareness of people to conserve the natural resources and wildlife. Moreover the expansion of the urban has been effect to the raptor habitat. Therefore, the driven of those three major activities are stil necessary operate and also has to be done with education and contribution of public awareness in raptor conservation. Moreover, those has to pass to next generation as a future of raptors in Thailand and Asia. At least, raptors must have freedom to fly, have right to breeding and do migrating as their life belong. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current Raptor Conservation in Indonesia
(Adam) A. Supriatna
General overview
Indonesia is mega biodiversity country and blessed with rich bird diversity. To date, there are c. 1600 species of birds recorded in the country - it is among the highest in the world; and 372 out of 1600 are endemic species. This high degree of endemism is also true for the birds of prey, with no fewer than 72 species of diurnal raptors (Supriatna 2014); 13 out out of 72 are endemic species and 46 endemic subspecies. Sadly, many of the Indonesian birds are being threatened; at least 121 species of birds in Indonesia being threatened with extinction (IUCN/ BirdLife (2011). Number of species with Critically Endangered status has drastical y increased, from 4 species in 1995 to be 18 in 2010 (PHKA/ BirdLife International, IUCN 2011). Rampant habitat loss and exploitation are major causes facing birds in the country. Indonesia's lowland tropical forests, the richest in timber resources and biodiversity, are most at risk. During 2000-2005 for instance, Indonesia had lost 1.089560 ha of forests per year. They have been almost entirely cleared, i.e. Sulawesi (World Research Institute 2002). Raptor diversity
In total, 72 diurnal raptors from Pandionidae (1 species), Accipitridae (61 species) and Falconidae (10 species) have been recorded in Indonesian, mainly consisting of both sedentary and migratory species as wel as few vagrants (Supriatna, 2015). In term of endemism, Indonesia is notable for high raptor endemism and it is made possible by, i.e. Oceanic islands in Wal acea that al ows for al opatric speciation. Sulawesi for instance, it has 6 endemic species and 7 subspecies. Also, Moluccas and Lesser Sundas, each has 12 and 11 subspecies respectively. For the whole country, there are 13 endemic species (Table 1) and c. 68 subspecies. Given ongoing taxonomical studies on birds held lately, more splitting might be stil possible in raptor for the genus Spilornis for instance. Recently, Gjershaugh et al. (2009) described subspecies weskei as a distinct species adding more species to the list. Raptor migration -Totally 42 species are beleived to migrate in at least part of their
range (Table 2). Two of the world' principal raptor-migration flyways occur in the country: the East-Asian Continental Flyways and the East-Asian Oceanic Flyway (Bildstein 2006, Germi 2009). Data on this migration, in particularly its ecological migration, is stil very The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
lacking either from the eastern or northern part of the archipelago. So that, not only migratory routes need to be further checked but also its ecology of migration is stil less
Raptor consevation

Currently 7 species are threatened by extinction; 2 Critically Endangered, 1 Endangered, and 4 Vulnerable. Five are Near Threatened (IUCN 2010, GRIN 2010). To compare with, PHKA/BirdLife International (1995) only considered 3 raptors were threatened: two species being Vulnerable (Guinea Eagle Harpyopsis novaeguineae and Wal aces's Hawk- Eagle Nisaetus nanus) and one being Endangered (Javan Hawk Eagle Nisaeus bartelsi). Plate 1 show a pair of Javan Hawk Eagle perching in a remaining forest in Weat Java. Table 3 shows significant status changes reflecting impacts of habitat loss and heavy exploitation compared to 1995.
Table 1
. Endemic raptors of Indonesia
Endemic species
Main Island(s)
Kinabalu Serpent-Eagle (Spilornis Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei) kinabaluensis) Sulawesi Serpent-eagle Sulawesi incl. Siau, Talisei, Lembeh, Selayar, Muna, Buton, Togian, Peleng and Banggai, Taliabu, Mangole and Sulabesi Sulawesi Crested Goshawk ( Spot-tailed Sparrowhawk Sulawesi incl. Talisei, Muna and Buton Moluccan Goshawk North Mollucas incl. Morotai, Halmahera and Sulawesi Small Sparrowhawk Mollucan Sparrowhawk Mollucas incl. Morotai, Halmahera, Bacan, Obi, Buru, Ambon and Seram Vinous-breasted Sparrowhawk Sulawesi Simeulue Hawk Eagle (Nisaetuss Simeuleu northwest Sumatra vanheurni) 10. Flores Hawk Eagle (Nisaet 11. Javan Hawk Eagle 12. Sulawesi Hawk-Eagle 13. Mollucan Kestrel Indonesia and East Timor The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Plate 1. The Endangered and endemic Javan Hawk Eagle (Nisaetus bartelsi); female
(left) and male (right) facing habitat loss and trade Photo by Nakajima Yasuo.
Table 2
. Migratory Raptors found in Indonesia; C=complete, P=partial, I=irruptive (as explained by Kerlinger
(1989); Zalles and Bildstein (2000). Conservation Status refers to IUCN (2011). List follows Sukmantoro et al.
(2007) modified with Ferguson-Less & Christie (2005).
No Species
Scientific Name
Migration
Pandion haliaetus Aviceda jerdoni Aviceda subcristata Aviceda leuphotes *Eastern Honey-buzzard Pernis orientalis Black-shouldered Kite Elanus caeruleus Milvus migrans Haliastur sphenurus Haliastur indus 10 White-bellied Fish-eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster 11 Lesser Fishing-eagle Ichthyophaga humilis 12 Grey-headed Fishing-eagle Ichthyophaga ichthyaetus 13 Short-toed Snake-eagle Circaetus gallicus 14 Crested Serpent-eagle Spilornis cheela 15 Western Marsh Harrier Circus aeruginosus 16 Eastern Marsh Harrier Circus spilonotus 17 Australasian Marsh Herrier Circus approximans 18 Spotted Harrier Circus assimilis Circus melanoleucos The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
20 Crested Goshawk Accipiter trivirgatus Accipiter badius 22 Brown Goshawk Accipiter fasciatus 23 Japanese Sparrowhawk Accipiter gularis Accipiter virgatus 25 Grey-faced Buzzard-hawk Butastur indicus 26 Common Buzzard Buteo buteo 27 Indian Black Eagle Ictinaetus malayensis 28 **Greater Spotted Eagle Aquila clanga 29 Wedge-tailed Eagle Aquila audax 30 Bonelli's Eagle Hieraaetus fasciatus Hieraaetus pennatus 32 Little Eagle126 Hieraaetus morphnoides 33 Rufous-bellied Hawk Eagle Hieraaetus kienerii 34 ***Changeable Hawk Eagle Nisaetus cirrhatus 35 Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 36 Australian Kestrel Falco cenchroides 37 Northern Hobby Falco subbuteo 38 Oriental Hobby Falco severus 40 Australian Hobby Falco longipennis Falco berigora 42 Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus * Recognized as subspecies (Pernis ptilorhyncus orientalis) by ie. MacKinnon and Phillips (1993) ** Very rare, could be vagrant *** Recognized as Spizaetus cirrhatus by i.e. MacKinnon and Phillips (1993)
Table 3
. Threatened and Near Threatened Raptors found in Indonesia (IUCN 2011, GRIN 2011). IE= Island Endemic.
(*) The species with asteriks has been threatened since 1995 and (**) the species is very rare in Indonesia or
vagrant .
Scientific Name
Major Threats
Lesser Fishing-eagle Ichthyophaga humilis Loss of forest habitat along rivers, Grey-headed Fishing- Ichthyophaga Loss of undisturbed wetlands and ichthyaetus Kinabalu Serpent-eagle Spilornis kinabaluensis Habitat loss, degradation and Bawean Serpent-eagle1 Spilornis baweanus Illegal logging, burning, and recreational hunting Accipiter nanus Forest loss in the lower-lying areas of Megatriorchis doriae Habitat loss (need further confirmation) New Guinea Eagle* Harpyopsis Logging roads also open up previously novaeguineae inaccessible areas to hunting Aquila clanga Declines in the availability of habitat 1 Bawean Serpent-eagle (Spilornis baweanus) is not threated as full species by i.e. BirdLife (2011) but Global Raptor Network (see also Nijman 2006) suggested that the species should be threated as Critically Endangered. This suggestion is followed in this report. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Aquila gurneyi Habitat loss and degradation. 10 Flores Hawk Eagle Nisaetus floris Habitat degradation, destruction, and 11 Javan Hawk Eagle* Nisaeus bartelsi Habitat loss and trade 12 Wallace's Hawk Eagle* Nisaetus nanus Habitat loss, degradation, and fragmentation as a result of large-scale commercial logging
Threats to Raptors per Region
To be easier I devide Indonesia as six biogegraphic regions as shown in Figure 2 below. Threats to all raptor species in Indonesia can be grouped into habitat loss and exploitation. Table 2 below summarises threats facing raptors in Indonesia. Figure 2. Avifauna regions
of Indonesia
Table 4. Summary of threats to raptors in each region of Indonesia.
No Region & endemism
Species involved
Land conversion into 4 endemic species plantation, mining (ie. 3 endemic subspecies tambang batu bara, timah), and human settlement/ housing development and investors with very strong b) Illegal raptor Weak law enforcement Black-winged Kite (Elanus caeruleus), Elang brontok (Nisaetus cirrhatus), Brahminy Kite (Haliastur Indus), White-bellied Sea The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Eagle. (Haliaeetus leucogaster) 2 Java and Bali: TV show using wild animal, Tiger and all raptor 2 endemic species Commercial advertisement species. Raptors found 4 endemic subspecies. using raptor (ie. cigaret e) were not only originally from Java but also from Sumatra, Kalimanan and Papua. Such TV show/ commercial ad has quickly stimulated people to posses Brahminy Kite as pet a) Habitat loss, Land opening and conversion All 1 endemic species 6 endemic subspecies b) Illegal raptor Poor law enforcement ie. conflict of interest between All economic life local people and palm oil 4 Nusa Tenggara (Lesser a) Habitat loss, Flores Hwak Eagle often catch All domestic chicken 1 endemic species 11 endemic subspecies a) Habitat loss, Human population 6 endemic species 7 endemic subspecies Poor law enforcement c) Pesticide use 2 endemic species 12 endemic subspecies 4 endemic subspecies
REFERENCES


Andrew, P. 1992. The Birds of Indonesia; A Checklist (Peters' Sequence). Indonesian Ornithological
Society. Jakarta. Beehler, M. B., Dewi M. Prawiradilaga, Yance de Fretes, and Neville Kemp. 2007. A New Species of Smoky Honeyeater (Meliphagidae: Melipotes) from Western New Guinea. The American Ornihologists' Union: The Auk 124(3): 1000-1009 Bildstein, K. L. 2006. Migrating Raptors of the World; Their Ecology and Conservation. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY U.S.A. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
BirdLife International (2010). The BirdLife checklist of the birds of the world, with conservation status and taxonomic sources. Version 3. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/ downloads/BirdLife_Checklist_Version_3.zip [.xls zipped 1 MB] . BirdLife International. (2010). IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded fromon Departemen Kehutanan. 2009. Eksekutif Data Strategis Kehutanan (ISBN 979-606-075-2). Direktorat Jenderal Planologi Kehutanan. Jakarta Dickinson, E. C. (Editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the World. 3rd Edition. Christopher Helm, London. Ferguson-Lees, J. & Christie, D. A. 2005. Raptors of the World: A Field Guide. Christopher Helm. Gill, F. & Wright, M. 2006. Birds of the World: Recommended English Name. Christopher Helm. London. MacKinnon and Phillips. 1993. A Field Guide to the Birds of Borneo, Sumatra, Java and Bali. Oxford University Press, New York. Sukmantoro, W., M. Irham, W. Novarino, F. Hasudungan, N. Kemp & M. Muchtar. 2007. Daftar Burung Indonesia (Checklist of Indonesian Birds) No. 2. Indonesian Ornithologists' Union, Bogor. PHPA/ BirdLife International. 1995. Burung-burung terancam punah di Indonesia. Bogor. FWI/GFW. 2002. The State of the Forest: Indonesia. Bogor, Indonesia: Forest Watch Indonesia, and Washington DC: Global Forest Watch. Germi, F., George S. Young, Agus Salim, Wesley Pangimanen, and Mark Schellekens. 2009. Over- mcean raptor migration in a monsoon regime: spring and autumn 2007 on Sangihe, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Forktail 25: 104-116. Gjershaugh, J. O., Heather R. L. Lerner, and Olah H. Diserud. 2009. Taxonomy and distribution of the Pygmy Eagle (Aquila [Hieraaetus] weiskei) (Accipitriformes: Accipitridae). Magnolia Press: Zootaxa 2326: 24–38 The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current Raptor Conservation in Japan
INOUE TAKEHIKO
Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network 1-25-9, Asahigaoka, Otsu, Shiga-prefecture, 520-0052. Japan E-mail: goldeneagle@hera.eonet.ne.jp
In 2012, I have reported "the summary of the raptor conservation in Japan" at the ARRCN symposium in Korea. In this session, I introduce the following recent topics in Japan. White-Tailed Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla albicilla) and Steller's Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus
pelagicus
)
170 pairs of White-Tailed Sea Eagle has been breeding in Hokkaido and 700-900 individuals are wintering. The population of Steller's Sea Eagle is about 1400-1700 individuals in winter. The number of the individuals to be rescued is increasing. The main causes are traffic accidents, lead poisoning, and electric shock and windmill collision. The protection measures for both species are the following: rescue of wounded individuals, treatment and rehabilitation, monitoring food resource survey of wintering individuals, behavioral analysis research for preventing from windmill collision. In addition, the carcass of the hunted Hokkaido Sika Deer (Cercus nippon yezoensis) is one of the main foods for eagles in winter. These deer were hunted with lead bul ets and lead poisoning occurs by taking lead pieces left around the wound that bul et hit and in the carcass. Also some gun shot cases also are seen yet. Lead poisoning is confirmed in 160 individuals since 1996. Lead level of liver is usually less than 0.2ppm but in the cases of lead poisoning, 9.5-89ppm which equivalent to 47.5-445 times the normal numerical has been detected. As the countermeasures in Hokkaido, Law revision was made and the followings measures were taken by in 2004: The use of lead bul ets was banned. The carcass of hunted deer is prohibited to be left in the field. The recovery boxes for the carcass were set in the hunting area. Lead poisoning is seen among the Mountain Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus nipalensis orientalis) also. Even now some individuals in lead poisoning are seen; we're concerned about that there are a few hunters using lead bul ets yet and the lead contamination in the field still Blakiston's Fish-Owl (Ketupa blakistoni blakistoni)
The Blakiston's Fish-Owl is a species that inhabit only in Hokkaido in Japan. In the 1970s, only 70 individuals inhabited because the upstream migration salmon as the main prey are al captured at the estuaries and the possible large trees for nest have been decreased. The The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
national conservation projects have started in 1984; such as the installation of artificial nest boxes, feeding fish, breeding in the zoo and traffic accident prevention measures have been carried out. Up to the present, live fish of 100-800kg per year have been fed in winter per one place on the 10 locations. 171 Nest box have been installed, the breeding has been confirmed in 46 boxes. In 2014, breeding success was confirmed in 18 boxes and in two natural wood-nests. Consequently 140 individuals have been confirmed in 2016.And because the half of individuals inhabit in the Shiretoko area and the habitat are divided, reintroduction have been carried out. Owls have been reintroduced to the eight places and individuals have settled themselves into the four places. Grey-Faced Buzzard (Butastur indicus)
Grey-Faced Buzzard breeds in Japan and migrates to southern Asia countries in autumn. The species is considered to be susceptible to the situation of the arable land as the main hunting place. Comparing the survey result of the 1970s with the1997 - 2002, the population has been dramatically decreased to nearly half (decrease from 40,000 to 20,000 in migration count). The main factor is the habitat loss due to the farmland abandonment and the land change. This hawk has been ranked in VU of the endangered in 2006 from the outside of the Red List. Moreover, in order to reduce the development impact in the habitat, the Ministry of the Environment has formulated the guideline to precede the conservation of the Grey-Faced Buzzard in 2013. In this guideline, Effective research and analysis methods are shown. And specific conservation measures are exemplified: two breeding seasons survey is needed to figure out of the habitat use of the pair, the project plan should be changed within 500 m from the nest as much as possible, the construction work within 200 m from the nest must not be carried out in the breeding season. In addition, the conservation policy in the future is described: promoting the basic research, preservation of farm land as the habitat and training experts for the conservation project.
Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis fujiyamae)
The rank of the Northern Goshawk in the Red List has been changed to NU in 2006 because
the number of individuals has recovered sufficiently and the distribution has enlarged. As a result, the Goshawk has been selected as semi-endangered species not endangered. In the survey in 2008, about 6,000 individuals have inhabited in the Kanto region only. As a result, the Ministry of the Environment has been considering excluding the goshawk from the list of "domestic rare wild plant and animal species," and the legal revision wil be carried out in this year. After excluded from the list, the protection level in importing, exporting and capturing wil change but the Ministry of the Environment wil maintain the The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
equivalent protection level with the aid of the other laws from the standpoint of conservation.
Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos japonica)
Approximately 200 pairs inhabits Japan, but the 77 sites that the pair has disappeared from been confirmed. The population is currently estimated to be about 500 individuals. In recent years, breeding success rate has decreased sharply to around 20%. And some cases that immature forming a breeding pair have been reported. Rapid decrease in the number of individuals in the near future is concerned. The main causes are considered to be the decrease of Japanese Hare (Lepus brachyurus) and Copper Pheasant (Syrmaticus soemmerringii) as major prey and the habitat loss due to the environmental change. The Ministry of the Environment has formulated the guideline in 1996 in order to reduce the impact on Golden Eagle associated with the land development such as the dam construction. This guideline has brought improvement of the conservation level in the measures to a considerable extent. And the guideline has been revised in 2012. It includes the new findings about the ecology of Golden Eagle, Mountain Hawk-Eagle and Goshawk, the improved research and the analyze methods for considering conservation measures taking into account the differences of natural conditions by region. In addition, the Ministry of the Environment has conducted work to make the master plan of protection and proliferation for Golden Eagle since 2013. The exploratory committee are considering now the following proposed: breeding monitoring, artificial feeding, ensuring prey animals through improving the foraging environments by changing the method of the artificial forest logging and the releasing individuals by artificial breeding The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current Raptor Conservation in Malaysia
Lim Kim Chye
Raptor Study Group Bird Conservation Council, Malaysian Nature Society (MNS)
1. RAPTOR MIGRATION MONITORING AND FESTIVALS Tanjung Tuan
Raptor Count and Raptor Watch 2015
Raptor Study Group (RSG) of Malaysian Nature Society (MNS) continued with its long- term monitoring of raptor migration at Tanjung Tuan (N 2º 24.4', E 101º 55.3') Malacca, Peninsular Malaysia. From 14 February to 29 March 2015, volunteers recorded a total of 48,548 raptors comprising 10 species, including Eurasian Hobby, a new record for the site. RSG also initiated the use of photography to determine gender and age groups in Oriental Honey-buzzards making landfall at the site. During the same period, MNS also organized Raptor Watch 2015 on 14 March, this being the 16th year that this popular public event has Report: Lim Kim Chye Waiting for raptors to arrive at lighthouse An Oriental Honey-buzzard flying in from the sea
Raptor survey at Rupat island, south-east Sumatra, Indonesia
Rupat island is the staging point for raptors leaving Sumatra to cross the Straits of Malacca
to Tanjung Tuan in Peninsular Malaysia. Rupat island is thus of great interest to RSG which had previously carried out two migration surveys there. As a follow-up to these surveys The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
and to look at the current situation there, RSG visited Rupat from 10 – 12 March 2015. Together with a local university student, we counted a total of 4,501 raptors, nearly all Oriental Honey-buzzards, flying out to sea at Teluk Rhu (N 2º 6.98', E 101º 40.22'). Teluk Rhu is now more developed but generally, conditions in the interior stil remain relatively undisturbed. A vil ager was seen with a captive Oriental Honey-buzzard, leading us to worry that perhaps the locals are trapping the raptors. Efforts are needed to raise local community awareness about the need to protect the migratory raptors and the potential to promote raptor migration as an income-generating ecotourism product in Rupat island. Report: Lim Kim Chye
Oriental Honey-buzzards at Rupat Island, Captive Oriental Honey-buzzard at Teluk Rhu
Taiping Raptor Festival 2014
Taiping (N 4º 52.24', E 100º 44.70') in north Peninsular Malaysia, is an important watch site for autumn migration, with some 60,000 raptors passing over the town every season. To raise public awareness about raptor migration, MNS Perak Branch has been organising the Taiping Raptor Festival (TRF) since 2010. TRF 2014 on 1 & 2 November held at Scott's Hil , Taiping had more than 400 visitors attending and 6,276 raptors of 9 species recorded over the week-end. The next TRF wil be held on 7 & 8 November 2015. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Report: Lim Kim Chye Explaining raptor migration to public Watching raptor migration at Scott's Hill, Taiping
Bedong raptor count 2013
Bedong (N 5º 44.37', E 100º 32.97') is a newly-discovered watch site in Kedah, north-west Peninsular Malaysia, with seasonal counts comparable to Tanjung Tuan and Taiping. In 2013, MNS Penang Branch organized the Bedong raptor count from 25 September to 5 November and recorded a total of 55,915 raptors. Thirteen raptor species were identified, making Bedong the site with the highest diversity of migratory raptors in Malaysia to date. The raptor migration workshop that took place during the same period on 27 October was very successful and included a talk on migration, discussions and field observation. It was wel -attended, with 45 participants from government agencies, MNS members as wel as Report: Tan Choo Eng The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Monitoring raptor migration at Bedong, Kedah Workshop on raptor migration 2. FIELD STUDIES ON RAPTORS

Harrier study

Harriers Circus spp are winter visitors to the paddylands of Peninsular Malaysia and play an important role in controlling the population of the rodents that damage rice crops. In December 2011, RSG carried out a study on harriers at a roost in Ulu Dedap (N 4º 4.789', E 100º 55.40'), Perak and established that the roost hosted 150-180 harriers regularly. Future RSG plans on harrier study include investigating harrier hunting range, diet and prey intake. In order to keep up members' interest on harriers, RSG Chair Lim Aun Tiah organised a talk "Field Identification of Harriers" on 6 March 2015. This was followed by a trip to Ulu Dedap from 20 – 22 March to look for harriers. Sixteen participants joined the trip but unfortunately, only a few harriers were encountered and none were seen at the roost on 21 March. It was thought that the harriers had moved to another site after the observers had left the previous evening. The lack of ground cover, with 80% of the paddy fields already harvested, and the late season could be why harriers were scarce. However, the trip was not a total loss as two points were established. The first was that harriers have continued to return and use Ulu Dedap paddylands as their wintering site. This is proven by the report from MNS members that about 170 harriers were seen in mid February. The second point is that when harvesting starts and the fields are ploughed in preparation for the next planting session, the harriers would leave for areas with sufficient vegetation cover that offer shelter and protection. Report: Lim Aun Tiah Field trip to look for harriers Eastern Marsh Harrier in harvested paddy fields The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Black-thighed Falconet (Microhierax fringillarius)
Since 2008, Connie Khoo S. Y. has been studying the Black-thighed Falconets nesting in the cavities of karst outcrops in Ipoh (N 4º 33.34', E 101º 7.35'), Perak, Peninsular Malaysia. Her observations have revealed interesting and also new information on the breeding ecology and hunting behavior of these smal raptors. Breeding has been observed in al months from January to June. Two and occasional y 4 chicks hatch after an incubation period lasting 3 to 3.5 weeks and chicks fledge after 2.5 to 3 weeks. Besides preying on smal passerines, the adults also rob nestlings from the nests of other birds. The adults have also been observed flying after and capturing in flight the bats and swifts that live in the caves of the study area. On several occasions, "helpers" were seen coming in with prey to help in the feeding of the brood. Report: Connie Khoo S Y ) Black-thighed Falconet cavity nest with 4 chicks Black-thighed Falconet with nestling prey
Grey-headed Fish-eagle Ichthyophaga ichthyaetus
The nesting of a pair of Grey-headed Fish-eagles have been observed by Connie Khoo over
6 seasons since 2009. The study site is in an extensive karst formation in Ipoh (4º 33.34', E 101º 7.35'), Perak, with steep, forested limestone outcrops enclosing former mining pools, some of which are used for aquaculture. The nest site was in limestone hil forest overlooking a large lake. Nest-building was noted to start in June/July and took about 8 weeks to complete. Egg-laying is thought to occur in early The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
September. The incubating period was about 24 days and the single chick that hatched left the nest after about 75 days. The usual clutch is one egg but in 2014 and 2015, the adults successfully raised 2 chicks. The juvenile stayed with the parents for about 108 days before being driven off by the male. The male was very aggressive during the nesting period and was observed attacking Purple Heron Ardea purpurea and White-bellied Sea-eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster that were in the vicinity of the nest. Fish was the main diet but the adult was also seen bringing back a snake and a squirrel to the nest. Report: Connie Khoo S Y ) The pair of male (left) & female (right) GHFEs The two juvenile GHFEs waiting for food
Malaysian Owl Research
The majority of the owl species in Malaysia is less studied. In the last three decades, only
Barn Owl Tyto alba javanica has been commonly studied with respect to secondary poisoning, feeding habit, ranging behaviour and breeding ecology. Recently, the study of another common species, i.e. Sunda Scops Owl Otus lempiji has been carried out involving radio-telemetry and cal playback methods. The practicality of both methods has been evidenced in lowland forests. Furthermore, recording of owl cal s was made to assess the presence of vocal individuality in the Malaysian owls. Variations in their vocalizations were examined so as to differentiate individual birds based on their cal s, which will facilitate the survey of owls without direct handling or capture. Report: Dr Puan Chong Leong, Faculty of Forestry, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Some recently published papers on Malaysian Raptors
Khaleghizadeh, A. & Anuar, S. 2014. Nest tree selection by the Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) in a Rhizophora mangrove forest. Tropical Zoology April 2014, Vol. 27 Issue: 2 p40-52, 13p Khaleghizadeh, A., Santangeli, A. & Anuar, S. 2014. Clear-cutting decreases nest occupancy of Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) in a managed mangrove forest of Southeast Asia. Ocean and Coastal Management June 2014 93:60-66. Khaleghizadeh, A. & Anuar, S. 2014. Breeding landscape and nest spacing of two coastal raptors (Accipitriformes): White-bellied Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) and Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) in Peninsular Malaysia. Italian Journal of Zoology. 2014, 81 3, p431-p439, 9p. Lim, K. C., Lim, A. T. & Khoo, S. S. 2014. Harrier species and counts at a paddyland roost In Seberang Perak, Peninsular Malaysia. Journal of Wildlife and Parks (2014) 28: 93-105. Tan, C. E., Lim, K. C. & Lim, K. H. 2014. Bedong, Kedah A major raptor migration site in Peninsular Malaysia. Journal of Wildlife and Parks (2014) 28: Puan, C. L., Yeap C. A., Lim, K. C., Lim, A.T., Khoo, S. S & Cheung, N. 2014. Northbound migration count of raptors at Tanjung Tuan, Peninsular Malaysia: Magnitude, Timing, and Flight Behavior. Journal of Raptor Research, 48(2):162- 172. 2014. Cik Mohd. Rizuan, Z. A., Noor Hisham, H. & Hafidzi, M.N. 2014. Observations of the diet of Black-winged Kite (Elanus caeruleus) in the oil-palm plantations of the Sahabat area, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia. BirdingASIA 22 (2014):55-57. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current Raptor Conservation in Nepal
Tulsi Subedi and Hemanta Dhakal
Introduction
Nepal is very rich in bird diversity. Among the 872 species of bird recorded in
Nepal raptor occupies 81 species (9.29% of total species). Among the raptors 60 species are diurnally active predatory birds and 21 species are night active owls. Diurnal raptor species consists 18 species of eagle, 9 species of vulture, 11 species of falcon, 5 species of harrier, 5 species of accipiter/sparrowhawk, 4 species of buzzard/buteo, 4 species of kite, 2 species of Baza, Osprey and Oriental Honey buzzard. The high diversity of the raptors is due to the rugged topography, diverse vegetation, great altitudinal variation (76 m to 8848 m) and to the zoogeography of the country. According to Bird Life International five species of vulture (4 critically endangered and one endangered), four species of eagle (all vulnerable) and one species of falcon (endangered) found in Nepal are listed as globally threatened. Similarly two species of eagle, three species of vulture, two species of falcon and one species of harrier are listed as a near threatened species. Recent reports indicate 41% of raptors in Nepal are nationally threatened (Baral et al 2012). The impact of the veterinary drug diclofenac on vulture populations in wel documented. Since a ban of diclofenac in 2006 and replacement with meloxicam along with several other conservation activities the decline rate in vulture numbers has reduced and now turning towards the stabilization.
Vulture Conservation Activities
After the formation of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation act in 1973, first
national Park was established and the conservation activities were mostly focused on the mega mammalian fauna and their associated habitat. Although there is a long history of bird watching in Nepal, raptor conservation work has a very short history in the country. Active work on raptor conservation and research begun after dramatic population decline on the Asian vulture population observed in the Indian subcontinent that has collapsed the population of three species of Gyps vulture (White-rumped Gyps bengalensis, Slender-billed Gyps tenuirostris and Indian vulture Gyps indicus). In 2000 the first nationwide survey on the vulture population and breeding was conducted with focus on lowland resident vulture species and the road transect survey (>1030 km) has been conducted that was led by a team of national and international scientists. This survey was repeated annually for few years that The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
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showed marked decline on the population of white-rumped (annual decline >14%) and slender-billed vulture (Chaudhary et al. 2012). The complete loss of breeding white-rumped vulture was observed in Koshi area in 2004. For the conservation of remaining vulture population aggressive conservation work has been started since 2006. In the initial phase the conservation work came up with the package of education, advocacy and research/monitoring. The first measurable outcome of the conservation was the success towards banning on veterinary use, production, distribution and import of diclofenac that was effective from 06 June 2006. At the same time production and use of safe alternative meloxicam has been started. The remaining stock of the diclofenac in the market has been started to swap with the meloxicam. Birdlife Nepal has led on the conservation activity in collaboration with different local, national and International organizations. Together with the diclofenac monitoring and swapping activities; population /breeding monitoring program has been also started from 2006. It was a big chal enge to replace al the stock of existing diclofenac from the market very quickly, therefore with the aim to provide diclofenac free food for the vulture first community managed vulture restaurant has been established in Nawalparasi district inside the buffer zone area of Chitwan National Park. The several other (total 6) vulture restaurants has been established thereafter mainly in the western part of the country. After 5 years back in 2009 the breeding population of white-rumped vulture has reappeared in Koshi. After a few years of monitoring and conservation program 7th vulture restaurant has been established in the eastern Nepal where Himalayan Nature (NGO) took a led to operate community managed vulture restaurant. In 2008 vulture conservation and breeding centre has been established in Chitwan National Park. More than 60 fledglings of White-rumped vultures captured from various parts of the country has been placed in the centre. The breeding center is doing wel and in 2014 first egg was hatched. Along with the vulture restaurant and the breeding centre several districts (total of 46 districts out of 75) covering 101160 sq. km. has been declared as diclofenac free districts in presence of local government authorities/stakeholders. Beside the NGOs there are some independent researchers also doing some conservation and research activities on different aspects of vulture species. This includes the educational activities, poster and leaflet production and distribution, breeding and The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
population survey of Himalayan vulture, Egyptian vulture and Red-headed vulture in their respective ranges.
Raptor migration monitoring and Conservation
There is a long history of opportunistic study/count on raptor migration in Nepal
including in 1970s, by Robert Fleming Jr. and others, for example: 2 Nov 1976 - Fleming counted 305 Steppe Eagles just over one hour passing close to Dhampus ridge (probably the present Thoolakharka raptor migration watch site). He also saw a few Greater Spotted Aquila clanga and Imperial Eagles A. heliaca. In 1984 - 7 Oct - 3 Nov, Bijlsma made observations, while trekking, from two locations: along the Jomsom trek near Kande (about 1.5 km below from Thooklakharka) and Steppe Eagle migration peaked in late October (1332 raptors were counted including 1,169 Steppe Eagles), in 1985 – (20 Oct - 7 Nov) DeRoder, counted 7,852 Steppe Eagles above the smal town of Kande, with maximum of 1,397 eagles on 1 November, in 1999 - (late Oct to early Nov), DeCandido counted 821 Steppe Eagles and 8 other migrating raptor species in his nine days of observation and in 2003 – (24 Oct - 5 Dec), Surya Gurung counted 6,503 migrating Steppe Eagles with a highest count of 571 raptors on 23 November. Approximately 22 species of raptors are winter visitor to Nepal and some individuals of those species overwinter in the lowland area of the country. Our research on raptor migration from Thoolakharka raptor migration watch site indicates 37 species of raptors migrates through the foothills of Himalayas (Subedi et. al. 2013, 2014). Few raptor species including large number of Himalayan vulture Gyps himalayensis are altitudinal migrants here. Mainly juveniles and sub-adults migrate from high altitude breeding ground to the lowland for wintering that returns in the breeding ground til late spring to early summer.
After a short reconnaissance survey in November 2011, Tulsi subedi, Robert
DeCandido and others are the one who started first ful season raptor migration count starting from 15 September through early December. The migration count is continuous til now and we identified total of 37 species during migration and counted approximately 15000 individual species of raptors in each season. In the same program raptor conservation camps were conducted in 40 schools along the migration site (Lumle, Thoolakharka, Dhampus and north of Pokhara) and in the wintering sites at the lowland (Lumbini and Kapilvastu) area and around Pokhara The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
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Owl conservation activities
Owl conservation activities has been initiated in leadership of Raju Acharya. His
team did study on ethno-owl relationship on 2008/09 inside Annapurna Conservation Area of Nepal. In his study he found there is a huge pressure on owl population due to trapping and trade. Similarly Tulsi Subedi in 2012 did study on bird hunting and trade with main focus on raptors. Both of the studies found there are some middleman who use the local peoples to capture owls and other birds to transport them to some of the international hubs. For the conservation of owl's population some non-for-profit organizations are now doing several awareness and educational camps to protect owl population. In each year a NGO named Friends of Nature (FON) organizes owl festivals to raise awareness on the public to protect owl's population on their potential area.
Challenges in Raptor conservation:
People and traders are often found mongering rumors without any scientific and medical proofs to increase the market price of the products made from raptors and owls. In Newakot, Itahari, Manang, Okhaldhunga and Khotang districts of Nepal people pay high price for Eurasian Eagle Owl (Dhakal and Subedi 2013). It is believed that if turmeric powder is put on the upper part of their wings they turn black, and if a packet of rice is kept under the wings it gets cooked, and if torch is directed into its eyes, they burst. Similar findings are mentioned in the study report by Acharya and Ghimire 2009. Some of the community fully depends on hunting and trafficking of raptors and owls for living. Others are found rearing chicks of raptors and owls and selling them to middlemen after they are fully grown. In some villages people also used the technique of taxidermy locally, to use skins of raptors and owls to adorn the wall of the house and for selling it in the market as they fetch good prices. Chicks, products of body parts of owls and raptors are collected locally. They are transported to the nearest city or district headquarters from where they are traded to bigger cities like Pokhara, Kathmandu, Itahari and Dhangadi. Chicks of raptors and owls after reaching the city are purchased by people for use as pets at a high price. They are subsequently traded to India, Bangladesh, China and other Middle East countries. This is also mentioned in the report of Acharya and Ghimire 2009. The Conservation work is itself a challenging work in the developing country like Nepal. Conservation here is mainly focused on the large wild animals like tiger, leopard, rhino, elephant etc. very few people are only aware about the term wildlife conservation. Since few years back there are many programs running in Vulture and Owl Conservation, but still conservation efforts for other species of raptors are lacking. Today we lack strict law and its implementation, financial support, public awareness, raptor biologist, raptor rehabilitation centers for the conservation of raptors in Nepal The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current Raptor Conservation in Philippines
-: Identification of Raptor Migration Routes in the Philippines :-
Alex M. Tiongco, Ma. Teresa A. Cervero
The Philippines has on record 31 species of raptors Six (6 ) species are endemic: (1)Philippine Eagle Pithecophaga jefferyi; (2) Philippine Honey-buzzard Pernis steerei; (3) Philippine Serpent Eagle Spilornis holospilus; (4)Luzon Hawk-eagle Nisaetus philippensis; (5) Pinskers Hawk-eagle Nisaetus pinskeri; (6) Philippine Falconet Microhierax erythrogenys Eleven (11)species are sedentary: (1) Jerdon's Baza Aviceda jerdoni; (2) Black- shouldered Kite Elanus axillaris; (3) Brahminy Kite Haliastur indus; (4) White- bel ied Sea-eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster; (5) Grey-headed Fish-eagle Ichthyophaga ichthyaetus; (6) Besra Accipiter virgatus; (7) Crested Goshawk Accipiter trivirgatus; (8) Crested Serpent-eagle Spilornis cheela; (9) Rufous- bel ied Hawk-eagle Lophotriorchis kienerii; (10)Changeable Hawk-eagle Nisaetus cirrhatus; (11) Oriental Hobby Falco severus Nine (9) species are purely migratory: (1) Black Kite Milvus migrans; (2) Eastern Marsh Harrier Circus spilonotus; (3) Japanese Sparrowhawk Accipiter gularis; (4) Chinese Sparrowhawk Accipiter soloensis; (5) Grey-faced Buzzard Butastur indicus; (6) Eurasian Kestrel Falco tinnunculus; (7) Merlin Falco columbarius; (8)Eurasian Hobby Falco Subbuteo; (9) Amur Falcon Falco amurensis Five (5) species are migrants with sedentary subspecies: (1) Osprey Pandion haliaetus; (2) Oriental Honey Buzzard Pernis ptilorhyncus; (3) Pied harrier Circus melanoleucos; (4) Common Buzzard Buteo buteo; (5) Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus Except for the Philippine Eagle which is studied extensively by Dennis Salvador and the Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF), there had been no systematic studies of our raptors consequently our data bank on these lovely creatures is almost This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the routes of the migratory The Philippines is located along the East Asian Oceanic Flyway. For Autumn the Philippines serves as a funnel receiving migrating raptors from Mainland Asia, Taiwan and Japan and distributes them further south to North Borneo and Indonesia. For spring the funnel is reversed. Raptor Migration involves vast sea crossings The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Migration is greatly influenced by the monsoon winds:- Northeast monsoon for spring and the Southwest monsoon for autumn. But typhoons and low pressure areas which abound during the migration seasons make the winds very whimsical. Every year, thousands of raptors come to winter in the Philippines or simply pass through, but their species, numbers, routes and migration ecology have not been systematically studied. Starting the year 2012 with the encouragement of ARRCN, and our neighbouring countries, Malaysia, Thailand, Taiwan and Indonesia, a smal group of hobbyists from the WBCP have taken up the chal enge for structured studies in Raptor A series of field work over the last 3 years have been undertaken to determine: 1) the exit, entry and choke points these birds use in the Philippines, 2) the routes which raptors take in their journey over the various islands, 3) the wintering and roosting places. The aim is to raise awareness of the importance of raptors among the residents living along these areas in order encourage them to preserve the habitats and protect the raptors. Studies have been conducted at the following sites:- Sanchez Mira, Cagayan Val ey (2013 Spring) Claveria, Cagayan Val ey (2013 Spring) Sta.Praxedes, Cagayan Val ey (2013 Spring) Pagudpud, Ilocos Norte (2013, 2015 Spring) Tanay, Rizal (2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 Spring, Autumn) Malinsuno Island, Palawan (2013 Autumn) Digos, Davao del Sur (2013 Autumn) Cape San Agustin, Davao Oriental, (2013 Autumn) Sta Ana, Cagayan Val ey (2014 Spring) Batulaki and Cross, Sarangani (Autumn 2014) Whilst al the above areas look promising indeed, more time for study is required. However, 4 of the above areas have already provided great results:- Southern Luzon: Tanay, Rizal Spring and Autumn Migration Tanay, Rizal located at the foot of the southern Sierra Madre, 63 kilometers southeast of Manila. It is adjacent to the Santa Maria Watershed which is a protected forest area. From the results that we have so far, we suspect that this could be a major choke point for both spring and autumn migratory seasons. Northern Luzon: Cagayan Val ey and Ilocos Regions ( Sanchez Mira, Claveria and Pagudgpud) Spring Migration Sanchez Mira, Cagayan Valley has been established to be a traditional roosting area for Spring Migration of the Grey-faced Buzzard. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Claveria and Sta. Praxedes, Cagayan Valley has been established to be the Spring Migration Flyway for the Grey-faced Buzzards, Chinese Sparrowhaks and other species of migratory raptors. Pagudpud, Ilocos Norte has been established to be a major Spring Migration land's end. Eight species of migratory raptors were observed leaving the land Southern Mindanao Cape San Agustin, Davao Oriental – Autumn Migration Cape San Agustin is located at the southern most tip of the Island of Mindanao located about 100 Km south of Mt. Hamiguitan Range Wildlife Sanctuary which was this year declared to be a Unesco World Heritage site. The watch area is an old coconut plantation and essential y isolated from people. This has been established to be the southeastern land's end for Autumn Migration for raptors, mainly Chinese Sparrowhawks on their journey southwards to Indonesia. A curious twist in their migration route was also discovered here. It was observed that after the raptors leave the Cape, they turned west and southwestward seemingly across the Davao Gulf towards Davao del Sur and Sarangani Provinces. Barangay Cross, Glan, Sarangani – Autumn Migration Sarangani province is located on the southernmost tip of the Davao Gulf with a coastline around Sarangani Bay and the Celebes Sea. South of the peninsula is the high island of Balut and the flat island of Sarangani. This is another important autumn migration flyway for raptors mainly Chinese Sparrowhawks on their Journey towards Indonesia. It was observed that raptors do not reach the southernmost land's end of the Sarangani peninsula. From Barangay Cross about 10 Kilometers from the lands end, Raptors veer southeastward towards Sarangani Island. The above studies are stil at the initial exploration stages. More and detailed observations and monitoring of these places mentioned and other places in the Philippines need to be made to confirm and accumulate data so as to build a more accurate picture of species, number and habitat of these charismatic species. Although we realise the value of the contributions of citizen scientists like the members of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines, the immensity of the information that we have to obtain and process highlights our inadequacy. We need the involvement of the scientists and the academe. In our brief study of the migration routes, we have found that the greatest threat to raptors in the Philippines is environmental degradation – be they small subsistence slash and burn farmers or property developers, or simply just natural disasters which is quite common in the Philippines. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Traditional hunting is another problem, although not quite as large and looming as environmental degradation. The solution we can think of at the moment is education. The ARRCN and the WBCP - Raptor Group have been conducting mini seminars and talks to interested groups and universities in the Philippines. In cooperation with the ARRCN and the WBCP - Raptor Group, the Cagayan State University wil be doing ful season monitoring of the roosting sites at Sanchez Mira in spring 2016. This watch wil be led by an influential hunter whom we managed to convert to our side in the course of our several visits there. We were promised that other ex-hunters wil be joining them. The Northwestern University of Ilocos Norte and the LGU's of Adams and Pagudpud wil be conducting ful season count at Pagudpud which has proven to be a jump off point to Taiwan and the Palaearctic region. We shal be talking to universities and townships and communities in the south as wel and hope that we wil receive the same cooperation as in the north. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current Raptor Conservation of SINGAPORE
TAN Gim Cheong,
Nature Society (Singapore) Raptor Migration in Singapore: a synopsis of the last 5 years (2010/2011 to
2014/2015)
Over the last five years, records from field observations during the autumn-to- spring migration periods and the single day island-wide raptor counts in November were compiled. Two initiatives were started to make the data more complete. The first was the extension of data compilation into the summer months in an attempt to monitor for signs of over-summering. The second was the first ful season raptor count conducted in autumn 2014. The Oriental Honey Buzzard (OHB) Pernis ptilorhyncus had been recorded in smal numbers during the summer months throughout the last five years, supporting the suspicion of over-summering by juveniles. One of the objectives of the ful season count in autumn 2014 was to look for signs of the Chinese Sparrowhawks Accipiter soloenis recorded in the thousands on passage in Peninsular Malaysia, however, very few were observed. In fact, the largest count was 2 flocks of 10 birds each in October 2013. Notably, the number of Japanese Sparrowhawks Accipiter gularis recorded almost match the autumn counts in Peninsular Malaysia. Of the 25 migrant raptors in the Singapore checklist, 20 species were recorded and the OHB was the most abundant. Notably, a single-day record of 745 birds was made in November 2013 (compared to 374 previously in November 2009). In terms of monthly numbers, a high of 3235 birds were recorded in November 2014 (compared to 1587 in November 2009). For the Besra Accipiter virgatus, which is very rare in Singapore, there is a positive record which set the early arrival date forwards by 37 days (now 20 October). For the first time, the Brown Hawk Owl Ninox scutulata (very likely japonica form) was recorded on migration during daylight hours in November 2014. The only record of the Himalayan Vulture Gyps himalayensis, a rare vagrant was in February 2015. Notably, a rare pale morph fulvescens Greater Spotted Eagle Aquila clanga was photographed on 8 November 2012. There is now evidence of the Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus, a rare passage migrant, over-wintering in the last 2 First record of burmanicus form Crested Serpent Eagle in Singapore The Crested Serpent Eagle Spilornis cheela, long held as rare resident, actually included the burmanicus form, of which a second-year individual 'wintered' in The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Singapore for about three months from September to December 2014. This is probably the first time burmanicus had been recorded this far south of its range. Potential changes in the abundance status of migrant raptors
There are now regular records of previously rare species and potential 'upgrades' in status include the Jerdon's Baza Aviceda jerdoni and Booted Eagle Hieraaetus pennatus from Rare to Uncommon. For the Jerdon's Baza, a relatively recent addition to the Singapore checklist, a high count of 11 birds was recorded in January 2012. The data for the Jerdon's Baza also set the arrival date forwards by 10 days (now 20 November) and extended the departure date by 19 days (now 13 March). The Booted Eagle's arrival date has also been set forwards by 16 days (now 18 October) and the departure date extended by 15 days (now 23 March) Potential 'downgrades' in status include the Black Kite Milvus migrans and Grey- faced Buzzard Butastur indicus from Uncommon to Rare, as both species are now harder to see in Singapore. Interspecies interactions - mobbing of large migrant raptors
For inter-species interactions, the Greater Spotted Eagle was observed to be mobbed by resident raptors and crows (Black-winged Kite Elanus caeruleus, Brahminy Kite Haliastur indicus, White-bellied Sea Eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster) and the Large-billed Crow Corvus macrorhynchos. Additionally, a Greater Spotted Eagle on autumn migration was mobbed by a Booted Eagle holding winter territory and retreated back north into Malaysia. The Short-toed Snake Eagle Circaetus gallicus had also been observed to be mobbed by the Research on resident raptors
The Nature Society (Singapore) Bird Group [NSSBG] initiated the Smal Grants Scheme in 2009 with the objective of supporting ecological research of birds in Singapore, particularly those that can provide tangible outcomes for bird conservation. The value of the grant is SGD1000 and has been used to fund a study on The Status and Distribution of the Changeable Hawk-eagle in Singapore. Another recent raptor study was Eating Aliens: Diet of the Grey- headed Fish Eagle in Singapore, which revealed that the abundance of alien fish species in Singapore's water bodies was benefiting the GHFE such that its population is increasing. The population is also expanding into other areas of Singapore and there is potential for the status of the GHFE to be revised from 'Critically Endangered' to 'Nationally Vulnerable'. Raptor talks / workshops
Over the last several years, talks were conducted to promote interest in raptors. The topics included raptor migration, basics of identification and activities of the ARRCN. More in-depth workshops were also conducted to foster better understanding of raptor conservation and ecology in Singapore and equip The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
birdwatchers with raptor id skil s in preparation of raptor counts. In 2010 and 2011, the NSSBG conducted the Raptor Biology and Conservation Workshop where topics included identification, breeding biology, migration, foraging ecology, conservation, basic research techniques. Participants were issued a booklet titled 'An introduction to the Raptors of Southeast Asia - Status, Identification, Biology and Conservation'. In 2012, the workshop focused on raptor identification. The Singapore Red Data Book is published by the Nature Society (Singapore) and the status of threatened raptors highlighted with recommendations made for the conservation of each species. A ful colour article on raptor migration in Singapore during the 2010/2011 season was published in the society's magazine Nature Watch to create more awareness amongst members about migrating raptors The society's bi-monthly NatureNews also includes articles on raptors every now and then. Monthly electronic reports of raptors recorded during the migration season and quarterly reports during the summer months also serve to maintain an ongoing interest in raptors. Bird Census
The NSSBG conducts a number of bird censuses each year where data on all birds, including raptors, are collected. Its Annual Bird Census is conducted in March (since 1986), Mid-year Bird Census in June (since 2000) and Fall Migration Bird Census in September (since 2004). The data showed an increasing trend for the numbers of Grey-headed Fish Eagle (very rare resident) and Changeable Hawk-eagle (rare resident). These data further support the trends observed through the monthly compilation of data on raptors. Free 'Birds of Singapore' app for smartphones to promote birdwatching and
build a support base for conservation
The 'Birds of Singapore' app was the result of the NSSBG's vision to have an electronic guide with photographs of all the birds in the Singapore checklist, including raptors. Bird cal s are also available for a number of species. The app was made free in order to reach as many people as possible and is the NSSBG's contribution to Singapore to promote birdwatching as a hobby and to build up the support base for conservation. The iOS version was released in 2012 and the Android version in 2014. Favorable attitudes towards raptor conservation - active WBSE nest
protected till eaglet fledged
A member of the public photographed a pair of White-bellied Sea Eagle (WBSE) nesting in a patch of land sold to a property developer to build apartments and wrote to the national newspaper. The property developer engaged consultants to do a biodiversity study and accepted recommendations to start work at the other The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
end of the land farthest from the nest. Foundation works such as piling work was re-sequenced. The wooded patch including the nest tree was retained with protective hoarding until the eaglet fledged a few months later. The actions by the developer signaled a change in attitudes that would be unthinkable previously 'just to save' a common bird of prey, increasing costs to the developer and delaying the project. Policy of 'greening' Singapore benefits raptors
Pockets of Greenery can support birds, even raptors. A pair of Crested Goshawks nested successfully in a park 300m wide, surrounded by high rise apartment blocks and a busy road, and a chick fledged successfully in August 2015. The nest was build high on a tall introduced African Mahogany tree! The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current raptor conservation in the Republic of Korea
Han-Kyu Kim1, Chang-Yong Choi1, Chang-Wan Kang2
1Department of Forest Sciences, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921, Republic of Korea 2The Korea Association For Bird Protection Jeju Branch, Jeju 697-340, Republic of Korea To document current raptor researches and conservation status in the Republic of Korea, we compiled available information on raptors between 2012 and 2015 from the published and unpublished sources. We found 19 published papers relevant to raptor studies during the period; the main topics of these articles were raptor monitoring and distribution (5 papers), diets and foraging behavior (4), home range and telemetry (3), conservation and threats (3), habitat selection (1), breeding biology (1), molecular analysis (1), and morphology (1). These papers documented the new records of rare subspecies in the Eurasian Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus tinnunculus) and Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus pealei), and updated breeding status of Grey-faced Buzzard (Butastur indicus) and Crested Honey Buzzard (Pernis ptilorhynchus). Diets and movements of the Eurasian Kestrel, Chinese Sparrowhawks (Accipiter soloensis), Peregrine Falcon and Eurasian Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo) were published, and there were anecdotal reports on window and aircraft col ision of Sparrowhawks and kestrels as wel as lead poisoning in Cinereous Vultures (Aegypius monachus). The other papers described tawny Owls (Strix aluco) using caves as roosting and breeding places, detailed breeding biology of Eurasian Kestrels, DNA barcoding of raptors, and sexual dimorphism of Chinese Sparrowhawks. Along with these published works, one active nest of the Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus) was found at Paju City in Gyeonggi Province in May and June 2015, and this is the first breeding record of this species in Korea. There was another study on morphology and niche separation between two sympatric forest owls using nest boxes and stable isotopic signatures during the summer of 2013 and 2014. In September and October 2013, raptor migration was monitored in two areas (Busan and Jeju) for the ‘Col aborative Survey of Migratory Raptors in South East Asia' of the Asian Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN). Through this monitoring project, we counted 3,784 individuals of 13species moving from Busan to Japan (dominated by Chinese Sparrowhawks) and 3,530 individuals of 10 species passing by Jeju Island (dominated by Oriental Honey- buzzards), and this new information enabled us to identify the peak season and local migration routes of migratory raptors. In particular, we identified that the main pathway of Oriental Honey-buzzards connecting mainland Korea and Jeju Island, that was newly discovered by this project, is included in a proposed construction zone for off-sea wind farms (28 turbines of 3.6MW capacity; blades reaching up to 150m above sea level). Because this information was total y new and had never discussed during the initial planning of the massive wind farm construction, we have raised a new issue about the potential impacts on the safety of migratory raptors by submitting a short consulting report for the second Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process to the Ministry of Environment in May 2015. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current raptor conservation in Taiwan
Yi-Jung Lin,
Secretary General of Raptor Research Group of Taiwan Taiwan is an island country with an area of 36000km2. Forestland occupies 58% of the total island area. Among 543 species of birds recorded on Taiwan, 33 species are diurnal raptors and 13 species are nocturnal. Thirteen of these are residents. Raptors are al listed as protected species under The Wildlife Conservation Act of Taiwan. Protected species is classified in three categories: Endangered Species, Rare and Valuable Species and Other Conservation- Deserving Wildlife. Indian Black Eagle (Ictinaetus malayensis), Mountain Hawk Eagle (Spizaetus nipalensis), and Eastern Grass Owl (Tyto longimembris) are the only three resident raptors classified as Endangered Species (Table 1). Raptor researches in Taiwan
Researches are focus on basic ecology of resident or common migratory raptors. In recent five years, more studies on endanger species conservation issues, trying to find out a better solution for raptor population sustainability (Table 1). Raptor conservation
1. Legal status
Raptors are protected under Wildlife Conservation Act of Taiwan. They shal not be disturbed, abused, hunted, kil ed, traded, exhibited, displayed, owned, imported, exported, raised or bred, unless under special circumstances recognized in this or related legislation. 2. Conservation Issues
Although no historical data exist for comparison, local people suggest major decreases of raptors distribution on Taiwan in the last 50 years. 2.1. Habitat loss and degradation
The absence of raptors in lowland plains and foothills most likely resulted from major habitat loss or degradation. Although in accordance with Environmental Impact Assessment Act, an environment impact assessment is required for each new development or government policy. This involves the investigation, prediction, analysis, and assessment of the degree and scope of possible impact on the environment, including any affecting nature, society, the economy, culture, and people's livelihood. Habitat conservation seems often to lose in the face of hypothetical economic gains. Eastern Grass Owl is a typical species affected by habitat loss. It lives on the plains and hides in tall grassland. This type of habitat in Taiwan is decreasing due to construction of roads, houses, or public infrastructure. The government The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
subsidies research and conservation projects lead by conservation NGOs and universities, in hoping to find out the population of grass owl.
2.2. Hunting pressure
Wildlife Conservation Act indicates that wildlife may be hunted or kil ed for traditional cultural or ritual hunting, killing or utilization needs of Taiwan aborigines. These activities shal be approved by authorities. The application process, hunting method, hunted species, bag limit, hunting season, location, and other regulations shal be announced by the national principal authority and the national aborigine authority. The population number of the Mountain Hawk Eagle in Taiwan is very small. Because its plumage pattern is beautiful, in southern Taiwan, the Paiwan and Truku aboriginal tribes have traditionally used them in ceremonial wedding headdresses, symbolizing a lofty position, so they are highly valued. In addition, in earlier years in the raptor pet trade, the Mountain Hawk Eagle was the most highly prized raptor species, and so it suffered great hunting pressures. Although public sel ing is no longer seen in the lowlands, hunting in the deep mountains and the il egal market have not completely been eliminated. In 2000 2005, at least 50 birds were hunted, and the threat of extinction of this species stil exists, so great efforts need to be made to resolve this issue. In 2014, Mountain Hawk Eagle conservation conference was held. The conclusion is to reach a sustainable Mountain Hawk Eagle population, by autonomous tribe managing the plumage-wearing regulation. 2.3. Poison
The seriousness of environmental toxin on raptors is not as wel known until in 2013, preliminary studies on rodenticide remains in raptors, Brodifacoum was found in five out of eight raptor carcass. This test also revealed agrochemicals was examined in raptors. The rapid decline of the Black Kite (Milvus migrans) in recent years is assumed to be a result of environmental contamination. Formerly, this species was very common on the plains of Taiwan, but a 1990 investigation revealed that populations throughout most of Taiwan had sharply declined or disappeared. At that time, the total number in al of Taiwan was estimated to be 175 birds. Till now, Black Kite numbers was estimated from three to five hundreds. Black Kites feed on smal animal carcasses near water and leftover human food, the chance is great to encounter threats from environmental poisons, including all kinds of pollution and rodenticides. The authority this year has announced to cancel the weeklong campaign of rodents control in farmland by using rodenticides. This policy has been employed for over 30 years, now has cal ed it an end. By 2017, the highly toxic liquid carbofuran wil be banned to use. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
3. Conservation efforts
3.1. Conservation education
Conservation education has long been promoted by enforcing into curriculum and informal education. In 2010, the Environmental Education Act has employed. All employees of government agencies and juridical associations who derive more than 50 percent of their income from government donations, as wel as teachers and students of schools below the senior high school level shal participate in more than four hours of environmental education each year. Works such as public education on not kil ing Grey-faced Buzzard (Butastur indicus), setting nest-boxes for Collared Scops Owl (Otus bakkamoena), promoting the love and understanding of Eastern Grass Owl, and cal ing for environmentally-friendly farming products for Black Kite are al devoted to raptor conservation. An increasing number of people have become interested in watching the hawk migration. 3.2. Public awareness
Citizens are more wil ing to understand their ethical relationship with the environment. Their knowledge, skil s, attitudes and values with regard to protecting the environment has increased. The general public has become more and more concerned about the overuse of agrochemicals and the presence of other toxins in the environment. They tend to buy organic or chemical free crops, such as "Black Kite red bean" or "Crested Serpent Eagle bamboo shoot". Citizen science is thriving. People devote their leisure time in helping collecting science data, such as migratory raptor counts, reports of farmland poisoned birds and road-kil wildlife. Al these works contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between wildlife, human and the environment. 3.3. Legal actions
In addition to Wildlife Conservation Act that protects raptor from being harmed, Animal Protection Act also helps by forbidding the sales of traps since 2011. Other progresses include policy cancelation of free rodenticides subsidy for farmland from 2015, and a future ban of using highly toxic liquid carbofuran. Works of RRGT
Raptor Research Group of Taiwan (RRGT) is a citizens' group formed by raptor enthusiasts since 1994. The aim of the RRGT is to organize and promote raptor research and conservation. 1. Research
1.1. Research projects
Long-term migratory raptor investigation in the north and south part of Taiwan. Satellite tracking of Grey-faced Buzzard and Oriental Honey Buzzard (Chinese Goshawk next year). Indian Black Eagle population monitoring. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Crested Goshawk (Accipiter trivirgatus) breeding ecology study. 1.2. Citizen science
RRGT conducts research projects suitable for citizen science. We use internet and social media such as Facebook to gather raptor information and manage our research volunteers. We hope to promote raptor research in Taiwan and let more people appreciate the beauty of raptors. 1.3. Raptor Research of Taiwan biannual journal
Published since 2003, it is the only raptor research journal in Taiwan. 1.4 Raptor ecological symposium
From 1995, RRGT has hosted the symposium every five years. The symposium not only encourages more amateurs and professionals to participate in raptor research, but also is an important platform for sharing and accumulating information, which is helpful for the conservation of raptors. 2. Education
2.1. Raptor investigation camps
To increase the identification of raptors for better training of our citizen scientists, we conduct this annual camp since 2001. 2.2. Raptor-watching activities
"Open Wings" is a monthly raptor-watching activity, which brings citizens to rural area and encounter raptors. 2.3. Raptor identification and guidebooks
Publish many raptor identification and guidebooks, so raptor information can become more accessible to the public. 2.4. Raptor documentary films and movies
These films bring the beauty of raptors to the public and attract more people to be concerned about the current status and crisis of raptors. The most important films are "Journey Migration. Love of Kenting" (2007), "The Oriental Honey Buzzard of ninety-night peaks" (2011), "Phantom of the Forest - the Black Eagle" (2011), and "Fly, Kite Fly" (2015). The last three received wildlife film awards. 2.5. Out-reach programs
Raptor lectures and ecological film festivals are held at schools and museums. 3. Future works
With the up-coming raptor movies "Fly, Kite Fly" first shown on the big screen, RRGT is ready to gather public attention on raptor conservation. We receive donation and support from the general public and enterprises, for raptor research and education works. In the future, we plan to build a raptor center for raptor rescue, rehabilitation, research and education, to continue our passion for raptors. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Table1. Status of Raptors in Taiwan Migration/Resident Research topicsc status (IUCN Red Lista/ Wildlife Conservation Act of Taiwanb) Falco tinnunculus Falco amurensis Merlin Rare winter visitor Falco columbarius Eurasian Hobby Uncommon transient Falco subbuteo Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus visitor and uncommon 2. Hunting behavior Pandion haliaetus Aviceda leuphotes Oriental Honey Pernis ptilorhynchus 3. Genetic 4. Habitat use 5. Movement 6. Olfaction* Black-winged Kite Resident in its range Elanus caeruleus Black Kite 1. Citizen attitude toward Milvus migrans conservation and ecotourism development* 2. Diet 3. Heavy metal pollution* 4. Poison* 5. Population* Haliastur indus White-bellied Sea Haliaeetus leucogaster White-tailed Sea Rare winter visitor Eagle Haliaeetus albicilla Cinereous Vulture Rare winter visitor (1 Aegypius monachus record in many years) The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
1. Activity pattern Spilornis cheela 3. Diet 4. Genetic diversity 5. Habitat selection 6. Home range Eastern Marsh Harrier Rare winter visitor Circus spilonotus and uncommon transient Northern Harrier Rare transient and Circus cyaneus Circus melanoleucos Crested Goshawk Accipiter trivirgatus 2. Diet 3. Nest-site selection Common transient Accipiter soloensis Japanese Uncommon transient and rare winter visitor Accipiter gularis Besra Uncommon resident Accipiter virgatus Rare winter visitor Sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus Northern Goshawk Rare winter visitor Accipiter gentilis Grey-faced Buzzard Common transient Butastur indicus and rare winter visitor Buteo buteo Irregular rare winter Buteo hemilasius Rare winter visitor (1 record in many years) Buteo lagopus Indian Black Eagle Ictinaetus malayensis 2. Population monitoring Greater Spotted Eagle Rare winter visitor Aquila clanga Eastern Imperial Rare winter visitor (1 record in many years) Aquila heliaca Mountain Hawk Eagle Rare resident Spizaetus nipalensis 2. Distribution 3. Food habit The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
4. Habitat use 5. Home range 6. Hunting pressure 7. Population 8. Seasonal movement Mountain Scops Owl Otus spilocephalus Collared Scops Owl Otus bakkamoena 2. Habitat selection 3. Hematology* Oriental Scops Owl Uncommon transient Otus sunia Elegant Scops Owl Endemic subspecies Otus elegans on Orchid Island 2. Dispersal 3. Movement 4. Nest-site selection 5. Population genetics Ketupa flavipes 2. Diet 3. Distribution 4. Habitat 5. Home range 6. Population estimation Strix leptogrammica 1. Activity pattern Strix aluco 2. Diet 3. Habitat selection Glaucidium brodiei Little Owl Athene noctua Uncommon resident Ninox scutulata 2. Hunting behavior Rare winter visitor Asio otus Short-eared Owl Asio flammeus Eastern Grass Owl 1. Captive breeding Tyto longimembris 2. Field Survey 3. Population monitoring system* a. IUCN Red List: VU(Vulnerable), NT(Near Threatened), LC (Least Concern) b. Wildlife Conservation Act of Taiwan: I (Endangered Species): those wildlife species whose population size is at or below a critical level so that their survival is in jeopardy. II (Rare and Valuable Species): endemic species or those species with a very low total population. c. N/A: Not any. *: Within 5 years The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Oral Presentation
Conservation, Disease and
Pollution Session
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Application of ectoparasiticide for Colpocephalum turbinatum control in
captive Barn Owl (Tyto alba)
Ausanee Bootyu
Fifth years student of Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, This study compared the efficacy of three commercial products pesticides (Etofenprox, Permethrin, D-limonene) and used them to control Colpocephalum turbinatum. Six breeding pairs of captive Barn Owl (Tyto alba) with large infestation were divided into three groups. Blood samples were collected to determine their health status (Day0, Day21), three pesticides were sprayed (Day0, Day7) and physiological response after spraying were observed. The result shown that Etofenprox, Permethrin and D-limonene can eradicated al Colpocephalum turbinatum in two weeks and there were no physiological change of barn owl's health from these pesticides. Therefore, these three commercial pesticides can applied to control Colpocephalum turbinatum and to manage Barn Owl's health program in the captivity. Because these pesticides are extra-label drugs used, so apply them carefully. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
The used of Barn Owl (Tyto alba) as rats control at rice-field in Yogyakarta
Daniel Harjanto, Heri Susanto, Retnawan, Vinsensius Ronal, Anggita
Reizda & Pramana Yuda*
Fakultas Teknobiologi, Universitas Atma Jaya Yogyakarta, Jl Babarsari 44 Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia *Corespondent author: danielharjanto6@gmail.com , pramyd@mail.uajy.ac.id Barn owl (Tyto alba) has been used successfully as natural pest control in Palm oil plantation in Sumatra and on rice- field in some parts of Sumatra and Jawa. Following the success story in those areas, farmers of Sumber Agung Vil age of Moyudan (Yogyakarta, Indonesia) adopted the method since September 2012. Initially six birds from Demak of Central Java were purchased by the farmers and additional ten birds then were donated from surrounding area. Rubuha (the house of barn owl) have been set up at almost at al rice-field in the area. Recently it was estimated more than one hundreds barn owl lived in the area. However, not al of the rubuha was occupied by the birds. According to the farmers the present of the barn owl has provide a significant positive impact to the rice production at Moyudan. The rice harvest per hectare was increasing about 20 %. The awareness of the vil agers about the important of Barn owl was stil need to be improved. Hunting of the birds was stil reported. In this vil age there was a place that used by local people to breed Barn Owl but stil need to be improved. Key words: barn owl, rat control, rice-field, Yogyakarta The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Secondary poisoning risks of anticoagulant rodenticides to barn owls in
agricultural areas in Malaysia – A review
Hasber Salim1*, Hafidzi Mohd Noor2, Noor Hisham Hamid3
and Cik Mohd Rizuan3
1 School of Biological Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, 11800, Minden, Penang, 2 Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. 3 Crop Protection Division, Felda Agricultural Services Sdn Bhd, PPP Tun Razak, 27000, Jerantut, Pahang, Malaysia Chemical control using anticoagulant rodenticides integrated with biological control using barn owls, Tyto alba javanica has been adopted since the late 70's against rat populations in agricultural areas in Malaysia. However application of second generation anticoagulant rodenticides in combination with the natural propagation barn owls has raised concerns of potential secondary poisoning to the latter. Initially researchers have proposed combining the barn owls with application of first generation anticoagulant rodenticide warfarin to control rats, however prolonged exposure triggers resistant of rats to warfarin. New and more toxic anticoagulants have been introduced in the early 1990's to deal with rodenticide resistance. The actions of more recent rodenticides are more toxic and exhibit relatively longer biological half-lives in tissues thus enhance the potential of compounds to cause secondary poisoning to barn owls that consumes rats in 98 % of their diet. Monitoring programs on exposure of anticoagulant rodenticides in United States and Europe have shown evidence of extensive contamination of anticoagulant rodenticides in raptors in particular of barn owls. Barn owls have been reported declining in numbers when anticoagulant rodenticides were introduced in farmlands against rodent pests. Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning has emerged as a significant concern for conservation and management of wildlife. In this paper, the literature dealing with secondary poisoning studies and concerns with the use of anticoagulant rodenticides in Malaysia are reviewed. This review includes studies on secondary poisoning risks of second generation both of laboratory and field study of anticoagulant rodenticide on barn owls in rice field, oil palm plantations and cocoa plantations. Such information is important for better understanding of rat management and for conservation of barn owls in plantations. The information wil improve the implementation of rat control in agriculture areas of Malaysia having barn owls like the type of rodenticide use and the method of application. Keywords: barn owls, secondary poisoning, anticoagulant rodenticide The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
The diet of Black-winged Kite (Elanus caeruleus) in Eastern Taiwan
Lucia Liu Severinghaus1, Jer-Chung Chien1, and Yu-Cheng Hsu1,2
1. Raptor Research Group of Taiwan, 2F., No. 149-2, ChangChun Rd., 10459, Taipei, Taiwan. zobbowl@gate.sinica.edu.tw 2. Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, National Dong Hwa University, 97401, Hualien, Taiwan. The Black-winged Kite (Elanus caeruleus) is a smal rodent specialist of open areas with scattered trees. It was widespread in Africa, Iberian Peninsula, Indomalaya ecozone, and New Guinea, but not found in Taiwan. In 1998, the first Black-winged Kite was recorded in Gongliao, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Now it is found throughout Taiwan. The objective of this study is to document the diet and foraging efficiency of this species in a recently colonized area - Hualien County, eastern Taiwan. In our study area, we found 4 nests in 2013 with 14 adults and 8 fledglings, and in 2014 we found 6 nests with 20 adults and 14 fledglings. This suggests that the Black-winged Kite population is increasing in Hualien County, Taiwan. By analyzing 128 pel ets, we identified 157 prey items, including rodents and passerine birds. Prey species were primarily Black Rats (Rattus tanezumi), Formosan Striped Field Mice (Apodemus agrarius) and Brown Country Rats (Rattus losea). In terms of biomass, the Black Rats, Nepal Bandicoot Rats (Bandicota indica), and Formosan Striped Field Mice were the most important prey species. Our rodent survey trapped six species in four sites. The most abundant species were Musk Shrew (Suncus murinus), Formosan Mice (Mus caroli), Formosan Striped Field Mice, and Brown Country Rats. These results show that the main preys of the Black-winged Kites in Hualien were the common farmland rodents. Thus the Black-winged Kite could function as a control agent of farmland rodents. Subheading: The diet of Black-winged Kite Keywords: Diet, Black-winged Kite, Rodent control The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Raptor electrocution at medium voltage power lines:
a case study in Mongolia
Md Lutfor Rahman, Batbayar Galtbalt, Batmunkh Davaasuren, Batbayar
Bold, Nyambayar Batbayar and Andrew Dixon
Md Lutfor Rahman and Andrew Dixon, International Wildlife Consultants Ltd, P.O. Box 19, Carmarthen, SA33 5YL, United Kingdom Batbayar Galtbalt, Batmunkh Davaasuren, Batbayar Bold and Nyambayar Batbayer, Wildlife Science and Conservation Center of Mongolia, Union Building, B-802, Ulaanbaatar 14210, Mongolia Electrocution of birds at medium voltage electricity distribution lines is a widespread problem particularly in Asia where the electricity distribution network is growing rapidly. Though this phenomenon potentially has significant conservation implications, relatively few studies have been conducted in Asia. We estimated mortality rates of raptors at different types of power poles along a 15 kV electricity distribution line running 56 km across open steppe in Mongolia. We investigated the influence of prey availability on raptor electrocution rate. We evaluated the efficacy of mitigation measures (insulation, two and four spike deflectors, brush deflectors, mirror deflectors) to reduce electrocution mortality rates for raptors. In our study, the globally endangered Saker Falcons (Falco cherrug) comprised more than a quarter of al birds kil ed. We also monitored 27 and 26 medium voltage power lines throughout the Mongolia during 2013-2014 to investigate extend of electrocution in the country. We suggest mitigation measures those are relatively inexpensive to implement and represent a cost- effective method to reduce the frequency of raptor electrocution events in these regions where cost is a key factor determining whether or not any form of mitigation is used. Key words: electrocution, raptors, mortality, mitigation, deflectors The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
CONSERVATION OF THE EGYPTIAN VULTURE (NEOPHRON
PERCNOPTERUS) IN BEYPAZARI, ANKARA PROVINCE, TURKEY
RANDA, BINTANG RANTAU
Department of Animal Science, Ankara University, Turkey Some people say that vulture is an ugly and gross bird. But actual y this species plays important role in keeping our ecosystem health and clean. When a vulture eats dead animal, the acid in its stomach which is highly corrosive wil kil the germ of certain disease such as anthrax, cholera and rabies that can be very dangerous to people and other scavengers. More than half of vulture population in Europe is in Turkey, especial y in Beypazari, one of district in Ankara Province. There are four vulture species in Turkey, Griffon, Cinereous, Bearded, and Egyptian. The Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is the most endangered species and already become global concern. Its position shifted from Least Concern to Endangered in 2007. This research focused on major factors lead to decreasing Egyptian vulture. Method used during this study were direct observation, literature research and interview. From the research, I found that 1) The vulture which usual y looking for food in the dumpsite was poisoned by poisonous dead cattle, 2) Weakness of government control cause dumpsite ful of non-organic materials, 3) The excessive of industrial development and 4) High competition among other vultures for food. This research proposes that it is very important for government and people to protect the vulture population such as protecting the dumpsite from poisonous dead cattle. Vulture has to be saved because this bird keep our ecosystem health The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Illegal Hunting and Feather use of Mountain Hawk-Eagles
by local peoples in Southern Taiwan
Yuan-Hsun Sun1 and Yung-Kun Huang2
1Institute of Wildlife Conservation, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan 2 Graduate Institute of Bioresources, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan We investigated il egal hunting and feather use of the Mountain hawk eagle (Spizaetus nipalensis) by local people in southern Taiwan with highest poaching pressure during 2004-2007 and during 2009-2010. A total of 164 hunters and 54 local leaders were interviewed from nine and six aboriginal townships, respectively. Of those hunters 63 (38.4%) claimed they once hunted the bird before. The number of birds captured by each hunter ranged from one to 220 eagles, and most (69.8%) claimed they caught less than 10 birds. Birds were mostly caught by steel jaw traps, followed by musket. In the 1950s-1960s, the estimated amount of eagles caught was <5 birds/year, increasing since then and reaching a high (40.2 birds/year) in the 2000s. Trapped birds were mostly sold for feathers used by tribe leaders who used to get feathers as a tribute in old days. However, most local leaders (90.7%) said they are wil ing to stop buying feathers once they can get feathers from government or NGO for free. In 2015 We set up a website (https://sites.google.com/site/ eaglefeatherdatabase/home) hopefully to collect feathers from domestic and oversea collectors such bird garden, zoo and rescue center for future use, and we wish this wil ease the threat the bird faces. Keywords: culture, feather, mountain hawk eagle, Spizaetus nipalensis. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Oral Presentation
Taxonomy and Genetic
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Plumage polymorphism in Oriental Honey Buzzards
Chien-Hung Yang and Lucia Liu Severinghaus
Raptor Research Group of Taiwan About one-third of raptor species have various degree of plumage polymorphism. Among them, the diverse pattern of Oriental Honey Buzzard (Pernis ptilorhynchus) is especial y wel known, but the persistence and variation of the patterns have not been closely examined before. We ringed 80 adult and 72 immature Oriental Honey Buzzards between 2004 and 2013. Both adults and immatures of both sexes have plumage polymorphism. Using the amount of dark feathers on the bel y and underwing coverts of each bird, we grouped them into dark, intermediate, and light morphs. The ratio of the three morphs were 44:31:5 for adults and 32:33:7 for immatures. Altogether, 34 individuals (20 adults and 14 immatures) were caught at least twice with photographs taken at each capture. We examined the photographs of the same birds over time to discern their morphological stability. The plumage pattern of al the 20 adult Oriental Honey Buzzards remained the same between years in both sexes, regardless how dark or light its plumage was. Only 4 immatures remained the same between years, three of them were the dark morphs and the fourth one was in the intermediate morph. The plumage of 10 immatures changed from being pale at the bel y, underwing coverts or head area to darker plumage over time, until they reached adult stage. Apparently the plumage of immature Oriental Honey Buzzards tend to darken with age, unless they were dark to start with. Whether this kind of color change exists in other populations of Oriental Honey Buzzards remain to be examined. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
First publishing Brown Hawk-Owl (Ninox scutulata raffles, 1822) in
Kondang Merak, East Java, Indonesia
Endah Handayani, Bima Diwanata, Alfi Laila Zuhriansah, Fetty Hariyanti,
Daysi Wulandari, Heru Cahyono
Jl. Semarang No.5, Malang, East Java, Indonesia E-mail: endah.handayani97@gmail.com The Brown Hawk-owl (Ninox scutulata Raffles, 1822) is an owl species found in several regions in Asia including Indonesia, particularly in Sumatra, Borneo, Java, Bali, and Sulawesi. In East Java, the distribution of an endemic race had been reported only in Alas Purwo and Baluran National Parks, although no documentation or speciment is available. This research is aimed to study the population of this species in Kondang Merak, South Malang, where the vegetation is similar to the aforementioned locations: lowland tropical forest. Main data collected consists of morphological identification, vocalization, and photographic documentation. Method undertaken is direct observation at night and in the morning, conducted in several spots. Results include time, intensity, and location of encounters with the species, vocalization, and first ever documentation in Java. The whole data shows new distribution record of the Brown Hawk-owl in Kondang Merak, South Malang, East Java. Keywords: Brown Hawk-Owl, New Area Distribution, Kondang Merak. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Relative abundance and Morphometrics of the Philippine Scops Owl, Otus
megalotis megalotis (Walden) in Mt. Makiling and Marinduque, Philippines
Michael S. Sanchez
University of the Philippines-Los Baños, College, Los Baños, Laguna The Philippine Scops Owl (Otus megalotis megalotis), a common yet an important lowland owl species to be protected from environmental degradation. This owl is only found in mainland Luzon and the isolated islands of Marinduque and Catanduanes and recently recorded in Polillo. Breeding of this owl in captivity thru natural pairing has been successfully done since 2000. A survey of this species of raptor was conducted using playback cal s to gain more information on its relative abundance. External body measurements and weights of live and museum specimens were also subjected to morphometry to identify differences between sexes and geographical variation. One hundred twenty eight broadcast survey points each site were conducted in Gasan, Marinduque and Mount Makiling, Los Baños, Laguna. Relative abundance and rate of detection rate was found to be higher in the Gasan, Marinduque survey site (t=5, p =0.0007, 30.46%) than in Mount Makiling study area. This study found out that this owl' detection rate decreases as the distance from the broadcast station increased. The distance and response time in both study sites were affected by terrain and vegetation. Meanwhile, live owls' sexes differed in weight and ulnar length while disparity in the measurement of beak, middle toe, and total body length were observed in museum specimens. Tarsus length was also found to be of significant sexual geographical differences between males while live juvenile owls were bigger than the adult counterpart. This geographical variation possibly depends on hunting mode, prey items and habitat type. Keywords: Philippine scops owl, relative abundance, morphometry, geographical The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
The Phylogenetic Study of the White-bellied Sea Eagle
(Haliaeetus leucogaster) Based on DNA Barcoding
Cytochrome-C Oxcidace Sub Unit I (COI)
Riri Wiyanti Retnaningtyas1, Windri Hermadhiyanti1, Dwi Listyorini1
1)Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, State University of Malang, Jl. Semarang 5, Malang, Indonesia 65145 The White-bellied Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) is one of the top predators living in the coastal area of Indonesia. This species has the distribution range all across Indonesian archipelago. However, this raptor population decreases particularly in the Java southern seas due to il egal hunting and the decreasing quality of their natural habitat. Meanwhile, this bird is stil poorly studied in Indonesia. This research focuses on the identification of Haliaeetus leucogaster and the phylogenetic study of this species by means of morphometrical analysis and DNA barcode cytochrome-c oxcidace sub unit I (COI) in regards to the conservation of this species. The method used in this research is by measuring the morphological characteristics and mitochondrial DNA isolation using Forward primer BirdF1 5'- TTC TCC AAC CAC AAA GAC ATT GGC AC-3' and Reverse primer BirdR2 5' ACT ACA TGT GAG ATG ATT CCG AAT-3'. The phylogenetic analysis using MEGA 6 with Maximum Likelihood method shows that Haliaeetus leucogaster in this study is closely related to Haliaeetus albicilla, Haliaeetus leucocephalus dan Haliaeetus pelagicus. Keywords: phylogenetic study, Heliaeetus leucogaster, morphological characteristics, DNA barcoding, Cytochrome-c Oxcidace Sub Unit I (COI) The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Vocal Individuality of Sunda Scops Owl (Otus lempiji)
in Peninsular Malaysia
Siew Ann Yee a, Chong Leong Puan a, b,*,
Badrul Azhar a, b, Phooi Kuan Chang a
aDepartment of Forest Management, Faculty of Forestry, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia bBiodiversity Unit, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Nocturnal habit, secretive nature and cryptic coloration of many owl species cause difficulties in their monitoring using conventional survey techniques. In the past two decades, bioacoustics method had been used as an alternative way of surveying owl species mostly in the temperate regions. The objective of this study was to describe the vocal characteristics of Sunda Scops Owl (Otus lempiji) and determine whether their cal s were individually distinct. A total of 24 recordings produced by eight male and four female Sunda Scops Owls were obtained between December 2014 and April 2015 in a lowland forest located in southern Selangor state, Peninsular Malaysia. Seven vocalization variables were extracted and measured from vocalization spectrogram. The cal of both male and female owls comprised of a series of single notes spaced at a fixed interval of 10-12 seconds. The mean note duration of males was 0.24 ± 0.04 seconds with a frequency of 0.5-1.1 KHz. For females, the mean note duration was 0.18 ± 0.01 seconds and the frequency ranged from 0.5-1.3 KHz. Results of Mann-Whitney U test indicated a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the sexes in terms of note duration, start frequency, end frequency, lowest frequency, highest frequency and center frequency, except internote duration. Based on ANOVA, significant differences (P ≤ 0.001) were found for al variables among individual owls of each sex. Our results demonstrated that both male and female Sunda Scops Owls can be differentiated based on their vocalizations. Assessing vocal individuality can be useful as a non-invasive method for identifying individual Sunda Scops Owls and this would facilitate the survey of the species in the future. Keywords: Otus lempiji, vocal individuality, spectrogram, Malaysia *Corresponding author. Email: The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Oral Presentation
Environment issue and
related topic Session
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Green Marketing in Hotel Industry, Thailand
Nattaya Chanvithee, Naphatsanan Vinijvorakijkul
Kasem Bandit University 10/195 LPN Pattanakarn, Suanluang, Bangkok, Thailand Given the growing globalization of tourism market, the United Nation World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) despite occasional shocks, tourism has shown virtually uninterrupted growth. International tourist arrivals have increased from 25 million globally in 1950, to 278 million in 1980, 527 million in 1995, and1133 million in 2014. Likewise, international tourism receipts earned by destinations worldwide have surged from US$ 2 billion in 1950 to US$ 104 billion in 1980, US$ 415 billion in 1995 and US$ 1245 billion in 2014 (UNWTO,2015). In 2014, Asia and the Pacific welcomed 263 million international tourists, 14 million up from 2013 (+5%). The region earned US$ 377 billion in tourism receipts, up by US$ 16 billion over 2014 (+4% in real terms). Asia and the Pacific accounts for 23% of worldwide arrivals and 30% of receipts Throughout times Thailand tourism market is recent growth economic by the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) 2014 report. In 2014 Thailand had reached 1.13 billion baht from tourism industry with tourists around 24.64 million persons (TAT Intelligence Center, 2014). Tourism and hospitality companies today face a scenario of exceptional uncertainly and change with the new economic and social growth henceforth market by a new geopolitical and economic balance with new poles of development (yeoman, 2008). In the hotel business we also witness the growth and development of huge international hotel chains like Accor, Starwood, Marriott or Intercontinental. Such growth is both quantitative and qualitative. If on the one hand the hotel chains have proven their commitment to the development of a worldwide supply (with recent and frequent openings in emerging destinations like the Middle East), on the other they have also developed their brand portfolio aiming even more to an increasingly specialized demand (Nuno,2013). The Accor group, for example, has now four different levels that vary from budget to luxury and upscale (ex: Fórmula 1 -1 star-, Ibis -2 star-, Mercure - 3 star, Novotel -4 star- and Sofitel -5 star) (Accor, 2011) and has recently launched the brand hotelF1, slightly different from the more traditional Formula1 because it is not just a budget hotel, but a design budget hotel (Nuno, 2013). The objective of this paper is to focus on the roles that the hotel industry can perform in the preservation of the natural environment by incorporating the green marketing. As Kerin, Hartlet and Rudelius say "Sustainability has been a topic of interest for some retailer for many years. Recently, however, it has become a movement for the entire industry. What happened? A combination of factors contributed to the change: environmental consciousness among consumers has reached an all-time high, publicity related to global warming has increased, "green" has become an important element of company image and reputation and most environmental initiatives save retailers money! (Kerin, Hartle, Rudelius, 2011) The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
We can decide how important of the green tourism and hospitality Thailand industry by the TAT campaign named "7GREENS". As TAT mentioned on their website "World travel industry, according to UNWTO, also contributes to this problem as it released 1,307 million tons of greenhouse gas to the atmosphere (2006) or 5 percent of the total greenhouse gas emission. The amount comes from air transportation 40 percent, 32 percent from land transportation, 3 percent from other transportation, 21 percent from hotel and accommodation and 4 percent from tourism activities. That's the figure from the past 5 years whereas the growth target of travel industry is constantly on the rise. This means the impact from the tourism industry on the environment would inevitably be increased (TAT, 2015). These days many hotels and indeed whole multinational hospitality groups are "going green" and drawing up detailed sustainability management plans to accomplish that They are doing this partly to help to ensure that there is still a healthy market for their products and services going forward, partly, let's be honest, to save cost, and partly because their customers are increasingly basing their selections at least partly on whether a hotel is perceived as caring for the sustainability of our planet which, as we all know, faces challenges to its very existence. The moves by the hotels in Thailand give both individual and corporate customers the opportunity make green choices, whether because of their personal values or to reinforce their public image of being environment-friendly. In the case of hotels that are implementing a clear strategy, it may be of their own device or set out for them by their corporate head office. Either way, the details are similar: they endeavour to reduce electricity, water, paper, printer ink and plastic consumption. Ultimately the goal is to reduce the hotel's carbon footprint – the amount of the greenhouse gas its operations put into the atmosphere – to a minimum. The actual measures taken can be little things like choosing not to have plastic water bottles at meetings and instead getting your water from jugs as you require. Or giving guests the option not to automatically have their sheets and towels changed every day. Or turning the air conditioning to a cold enough, instead of freezing, 25 C. In food and beverage terms it can mean sourcing more products locally and avoiding produce that puts a lot of CO2 into the air. Whatever the motivations, it can only be a good thing for everyone if these efforts continue to be encouraged and supported by everyone, whether inside or outside the The marketing of hotel as "green" or "sustainable" has emerged in recent years as an important constituent of the promotion arsenal used by the lodging industry. The reason is simple, both business and leisure travels are increasingly looking for places to stay that protect the environment as well as the health of their guests. In addition, many meetings and convention planners now function under orders that call for selection of only facilities that are sustainable (Ashrafi, 2014). So, the green marketing should be the option to promote the new trends for hotel industry in Thailand. Keyword: greenhotel, greenmarketing, hotelthailand, marketing, hotelmarkting The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
The Awareness Reinforce Process through Raptor Migration
Observation at Kho Dinsor (Hawk Mountain of Asia),
Chumphon, Thailand
Chalit Chiabphimai, Chana Kramkratoke, Athip Jansuri
Kasem Bandit University 1761 Pattanakarn Rd, Suan Luang, Bangkok, Thailand Ecotourism is a form of tourism that visitors have to be conscious of protecting natural environment, especial y some areas where natural richness, habitat, and food source have. Kho Dinsor or Hawk Mountain of Asia in Chumphon province is the place where have many migratory raptors. Therefore, there are many visitors, birdwatchers, and photographers interest in this place because the raptors are in the eye level closely. It is an amazing nature in the world; it is necessary for supporting ecotourism in Chumphon. In ecotourism, tourist should be conscious during journey for having the least effect on Kho Dinsor. Hence, this study has the awareness reinforce process in order to support the consciousness in ecotourism. There are six elements to create awareness: Motivation, response, making popularity and attitude toward response, organizing a worth system by considering from the worth that happened to practical and reliable way, making habit from the worth system which has been prepared and assessing and following up. These steps were used with travelers who are conscious of ecotourism and al officers who involve the travel ing part. Kho Dinsor remains plentiful and it also has balance of ecosystem as a visitant‘s food source. It is a good point of travel ing that is important in new travelling activities which give visitors more experiences, knowledge during journey, including has more income to province from "Don't miss 12 towns in Chumphon project". Keyword: raptor migration, ecotourism, environment, amazing nature The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Oral Presentation
Migration and Wintering
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Status and Conservation of migratory raptors in Indonesia
(Adam) A. Supriatna
SMP Negeri 2 Cipanas, Jalan Bukit DanauTegallega, Palasari, CipanasCianjur, West Java, INDONESIA.E-mail: Colin R. Trainor
Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University, Northern Territory, 0909, Australia, 0909.E-mail: In terms of migratory raptor, about 42 species are known to migrate to/ pass Indonesian territories, six are complete migrants.Dominant raptor species regularly seen in Indonesia are Oriental Honey Buzzard Pernis ptilorhynchus, Chinese Goshawk Accipiter soloensis and Japanese Sparrowhawk Accipiter gularis. These 42 species, mostly partial migrants, are believed to migrate in at least part of their range. Two of the world'sprincipal raptor-migration flyways occur in the country: the East-Asian Continental Flyway and the East-Asian Oceanic Flyway. Recently the first Indonesian record of Eurasian Sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus was confirmed. The status of two additional rare migratory raptors (Black Baza Aviceda leuphotes and Grey-faced Buzzard Butastur indicus) will also be discussed.These raptors use Indonesia for wintering areas and recent work has also confirmed that Chinese Goshawks winter as far as Papua. Recent fieldwork have documented new distributions of these migratory raptors in the country. This paper reviews the status and conservation of migratory raptors in Indonesia based on direct field observations like in Bangka and Rupat island (south eastern Sumatra) and published and unpublished literature. Threats to migrant raptors in Indonesia are discussed including loss of critical habitat such as in Rupat island, south-eastern Sumatra (a resting site and exit of the species migration from and to Indonesia through the Malayan Peninsula), fire and agriculture, hunting, and il egal trade. Keywords: raptor migration, Indonesia, status review, conservation, migration flyways, threats The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Identification of Raptor Migration Routes in the Philippines
Alex M. Tiongco1, Ma. Teresa A. Cervero1, Jelaine Gan1,2, Adrian M.
Constantino1, 3, Maria Katrina C. Constantino1,4
1Wild Bird Club of the Philippines 2Institute of Biology, 3Birding Adventure Philippines 4Department of Biology, School of Science and Engineering, Loyola Schools, Ateneo de Manila University There are 31 species of diurnal raptors in the Philippines of which 6 species are endemic, 11 others are sedentary, 9 species are fully migrants and 5 are migrants with sedentary subspecies. There is stil much to be learned of Philippine raptors, for example, there was a very recent first record of a nesting Eastern Buzzard, Buteo japonicus, previously identified as a migrant (Common Buzzard, Buteo buteo), and it is not known if the breeding raptor is a local subspecies. This paper reports on the most recent findings on the routes of the migratory species. Only the Chinese Sparrowhawks (Accipiter soloensis), Grey-faced Buzzards (Butastur indicus), Crested Honey Buzzards (Pernis ptilorynchus), Western Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) and Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) appear to be common migrants. Until recently, there has been a dearth of information on migratory routes and no conclusive findings can yet be obtained on whether or not different flyways are utilised in the autumn and the spring seasonal movements. Using both the Chinese Sparrowhawks and the Grey-faced Buzzard as indicators, we have so far identified 4 important migratory sites: (1) Tanay in Rizal Province and (2) Barangay Pancian in Ilocos Norte, both on Luzon Island for Spring Migration; (3) Cape San Agustin in Davao Oriental and (4) Barangay Cross in Sarangani Province which are located on Mindanao Island for Autumn Habitat destruction and degradation al over the Philippines is the most serious threat to raptor conservation followed by hunting and trapping which is more prevalent in the northern Philippines where the weather is harsher during spring migration due to tropical storms and cyclones. Identification of key migration routes can help establish a raptor monitoring strategy and also contribute to the conservation and protection of migratory raptors and their habitats. Keywords: raptor, migration, Philippines, Luzon, Mindanao The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Raptor Migration in Gunung Ciremai National Park
- Preliminary Observation During 2014 Spring Migration Season-
Asman Adi Purwanto
The migration of raptors in the East Asian Flyway from northeast to Southeast Asia is stil poorly understood (McClure 1998, Zal es and Bildstein 2000, DeCandido et al. 2004). Most raptors in eastern Asia migrate in a north to south direction in autumn, and south to north direction in spring (Clark, W.S in Newton Indonesia is an important wintering area for several species of birds breeding in the eastern Palaearctic. The archipelago has importat sites that serve as the migration route, stop over location and wintering area of migrating Oriental Honey Buzzard (Pernis ptilorhyncus) (Syartinilia et. al. 2010). Fifty-five raptor species are known to migrate in Asia and of these, twenty-five species have been recorded in Indonesia (Yamazaki et.al 2012; Purwanto et.al 2014 in prep.). The first systematic data on raptor migration in Indonesia were collected by Ash (Ash 1984, 1993) and this has been continued by individuals or group of researchers at several locations on Java and elsewhere in the country. However, particularly during spring migration season, the data is poorly known, with little or no systematic collection of data yet. Gunung (mountain) Ciremai National Park, located in West Java, is one of the mountainous areas in the northern part of the island which have been predicted to lie on the migration route of raptors during spring. A preliminary observation was conducted from 5 March to 5 April, 2014 at several locations along the eastern part of the park, with the aim to undertake the first counts of raptors migrating across the park during spring and to locate the main migration routes and crossing points in the park. A total of 2,124 migratory raptors were counted crossing over several locations along the eastern part of the park during spring. Six locations in the eastern part of the park that had been predicted as being on the traditional migration route had 5.7-46.8 ind/h of raptors crossing over during spring, with most raptors likely appearing from four main locations i.e. Mt. Ungaran (230-250 km), Mt. Dieng (160-175 km), Mt. Slamet (80-85km) and Mt. Mayana (30-35 km). Keynote: raptor, spring migration season, Ciremai National Park, preliminary The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Distribution mapping of Accipiter soloensis and Butastur indicus based on
occurrence data in the Philippines
Jelaine L. Gan1,a; Carmela P. Española1,b
1Institute of Biology, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 The migratory behaviour of certain raptors poses a problem to their conservation since these species cross international borders. The conservation of the raptor species must then extend to countries under the major flyway, of which Philippines contribute little raptor data. In the Philippines, locating flyway bottlenecks and key monitoring sites are of utmost importance in the protection of these migratory birds. The Chinese Sparrowhawk (Accipiter soloensis) and the Grey-faced Buzzard (Butastur indicus) are the most common migrant raptors in the Philippines, yet their movement across and within the country remains largely unknown. This study mapped the occurrence of the two raptors in the Philippines using recent, from 2004-2014, and historical data. Interestingly, although larger in numbers, the Chinese Sparrowhawks were observed in only 29 islands, compared to 46 islands for the Grey-faced Buzzards. Based on the recent data, a total of 54 new localities, which were not found in the historical data, were recorded for the sparrowhawks, while the buzzards had 56 new localities. Sites that had more than 500 counts in a single day were classified as potential watch sites for population monitoring. These include Calayan Island, Cagayan; Tanay, Rizal; and Pagudpud, Ilocos Norte during spring, and Governor Generoso, Davao Oriental; Digos, Davao del Sur; and Glan, Sarangani during the autumn. Inferring from the map, three possible autumn exit points were identified: through land tips of Palawan, Sulu, and Davao. The Babuyan Islands at the northern border appeared to be important roosting or stopover sites before the raptors cross the sea to Taiwan during spring migration. Ful or partial season counts are recommended to assess the importance of these exit points and to monitor raptor populations and movement. Key words: Raptors, Migration, Philippines The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Long-term raptor migration & illegal hunting monitoring
along Eastern Black Sea flyway in Batumi, Georgia
Johannes Jansen
Batumi Raptor Count, Lostraat 48, 9000 Gent, BELGIUM The migration bottleneck in Batumi along the Eastern Black Sea coast is a key component in the flyways of many of the Eurasian migratory raptor species. Taking into account the difficulty to conduct large-scale monitoring on these species' breeding grounds, the bottleneck provides a unique opportunity to detect trends in raptor populations originating from the huge landmass of East-Europe and West Siberia. For several complete long-distance migratory raptors the Batumi Raptor Count covers a highly significant portion of the migrants expected from presumed source areas in northeastern Europe, the western Caucasus and western Russia: Eurasian Honey- buzzard, Black Kite, Lesser Spotted Eagle and Booted Eagle. Especially remarkable are the counts for Black Kite and Marsh, Montagu's and Pallid Harrier. They are the highest total counts for these species ever registered during a single migration season. Observed migrants also included a number of internationally threatened migrants. The BRC explicitly chooses to monitor only a selection of species, with sufficient observers for a predefined duration of the season with daily counts. In this way we aim to increase the quality of data obtained through ground-based counts, to reduce the necessary count effort and to make it more realistic that the monitoring will be continued in the future. With this protocol we strive to obtain useful information on primary species populations, as a primary warning system for population declines, breeding success or shifting migration or wintering strategies. Recent monitoring has shown that up to 35 bird of prey species use this flyway and more than one million individuals passed through in the last four autumn seasons. But the illegal shooting of all raptor species is a common practice in the area. The impact on the migrating populations is unclear and drivers behind this local tradition are poorly understood. Therefore a monitoring of the illegal hunting is carried out simultaneously. From the count stations, the amount of gunshots fired were recorded. Additionally from a fixed point behind one of the watchsites, the ridges are being scanned for amount of hunters and their activity. To obtain an approximation to the species composition of the birds shot at the end of every season a standardized transects in four hunting hotspots is examined by which dead bird remains are being counted and identified ("body count"). With this protocol, we aim to provide a better estimation of the scale of illegal shooting of migratory raptors in a strictly non-confrontational manner. The results of the monitoring will be used as a first step towards the understanding of the effect of the shooting on the migratory populations, evaluating conservation actions as well as for finding mutually acceptable ways to solve this conservation conflict on the long run. The first results of the raptor migration and illegal hunting monitoring will be presented. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Khao Dinsor: a key site for monitoring raptor migration
in the Indochinese Peninsula
Chukiat Nualsri, Kaset Sutasha, Chuenchom Hanasuta, Wichyanan
Limparungpatthanakij, Khemthong Tonsakulrungruang, Andrew J. Pierce
& Philip D. Round*
For four out of the last five years (2010-2014), complete counts of raptors on southwards migration along the Thai-Malay Peninsula Flyway have been attempted at Khao Dinsor, Pathiu District, Chumphon Province, Thailand, and counting for a fifth consecutive season 2015 is ongoing. Annual totals have varied from 168,254 (2011) to 287,386 (2014) of 25 migratory raptor species. Reliable comparison of differences among years is confounded by differences in coverage (range of dates, number of observers), and highly variable weather conditions, etc. (the migration takes place during the seasonal transition between the south- west and north-east monsoons). The largest count (2014) was possible due to the engagement of The Flyway Foundation in mobilizing volunteer counters and interns to supplement preceding years'efforts, and occurred in spite of lighter headwinds in that particular year, enabling raptors to pass on a broader front, making them less liable to be counted, depressing the totals of some species (e.g., Chinese Sparrowhawk Accipiter soloensis). The migration of Black Bazas Aviceda leuphotes (>150,000) is the largest recorded for any site, and is spectacularly concentrated; that for Chinese Sparrowhawks (c. 90,000) is second only to the East Asian Coastal Flyway. Unexpected or elsewhere undocumented was the substantial occurrence on migration of species hitherto thought resident, such as Jerdon's Bazas A. jerdoni (c. 100 per year), Crested Serpent Eagles Spilornis cheela (c. 300 per year), Shikras A. badius (up to 6,000 per year), scarcer regular migrants (Besra A. virgatus, Rufous-winged Buzzard Butastur liventer) and genuine rarities (Bonelli's Eagles Aquila fasciata). The site also offers opportunities for study of non-raptor diurnal and nocturnal migrants. Few data are available for northwards (spring) migration as the migration front passes largely to the west of Khao Dinsor. As migratory birds come under a greater range of threats so the importance of population monitoring along flyway locations, such as Khao Dinsor, will increase. Consistency of coverage and adoption of new technologies should be improved so as to improve the confidence of yearly estimates. * Corresponding author The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Autumn passage of migratory raptors over Taiping, Perak,
Peninsular Malaysia 2000 – 2010: abundance, species and seasonality
Lim Kim Chye, Lim Aun Tiah, Khoo Swee Seng,
Lee Oon Teik & Mark Ng Meng Yong
Raptor Study Group,Bird Conservation Council - Malaysian Nature Society, JKR 641, Jalan Kelantan, Bukit Persekutuan, 50480 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia In October 2000, large flocks of raptors were discovered passing over Taiping, Perak, north-west Peninsular Malaysia. From 2000 - 2009, we carried out opportunistic autumn counts of migrating raptors, varying from 33 to 62 days of observation and recorded totals ranging from 7 492 to 52 554 individuals. Migration was observed as early as September 15, with passage continuing through October until at least 22 November. Typically, Japanese Sparrowhawk Accipiter gularis and Chinese Sparrowhawk Accipiter soloensis arrived first at the study site in mid September and early October, followed by Oriental Honey- buzzard Pernis ptilorhyncus and Grey-faced Buzzard Butastur indicus in late September and October and finally by Black Baza Aviceda leuphotes in late October and early November. In 2010, we carried out the first ful season count over 58 days from 25 September to 21 November. A total of 63 920 raptors of 10 species were recorded, with Black Baza, Chinese Sparrowhawk and Oriental Honey-buzzard making up 92.3 % of the total. Peak flight of Black Baza occurred on 9 November when 6 046 individuals were recorded; Chinese Sparrowhawk flight peaked on 28 September with 3 638 individuals counted and Oriental Honey-buzzard flight peaked on 26 September with 785 individuals counted. To date, 18 migratory raptor species have been recorded in Taiping, with Black Baza, Chinese Sparrowhawk and Oriental Honey-buzzard maximum counts of 31 866, 26 358 and 7 174 individuals respectively. The season total, species diversity and species totals in Taiping were lower when compared with autumn 2010 counts carried out at Chumphon, peninsular Thailand. Observer skil , location of observation site and the passage of raptors along routes that by-pass Taiping were thought to be contributing factors for the disparity. The predictable autumn passage of significant numbers of Black Baza, Chinese Sparrowhawk and Oriental Honey-buzzard and other migratory raptors over Taiping demonstrates the potential of the site for monitoring regional raptor migration as wel as for education and ecotourism. Key words: autumn passage, migratory raptors, Taiping The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Potential ecotourism for Oriental Honey Buzzards migration stopover
in Karangasem, Bali, Indonesia
Paraditio Bryan Prakoso1*, Syartinilia1†, Hiroyoshi Higuchi2
1Department of Landscape Architecture, Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia; *bryanprakoso@yahoo.com, † syartinilia@ipb.ac.id 2 Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Endo 5322, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 252-0882, Japan Knowledge of landscape characteristics of stopover habitats Oriental Honey Buzzards (OHBs, Pernis ptilorhynchus) is a prerequisite to understanding their stopover ecology for managing their habitats. Ecotourism is one of the way to manage the stopover habitat based on community approach for landscape sustainability. The OHB's migration routes to eastern stopover ground in Indonesia usual y stopover in Bali island especial y Karangasem. Based on satellite tracking data recorded 1–4 days in Karangasem, Bali. The study aimed to analyze a potential of ecotourism based on OHBs migration stopover sites in Karangasem, Bali. The main method was analyzed satellite-tracking data using grid method through Hawth's tools in ArcGIS. The result of this study was obtained three potential locations for OHBs ecotourism-based which represented different period of tourism activities. We suggested to combine OHBs ecotourism-based activities with the other ecoutourism activities in Bali for increasing public awareness of migratory raptor especial y OHBs. Keywords: GIS, landscape characteristics, Pernis ptilorhynchus, satellite- tracking, stopover habitat. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Apparent Human-induced Migration of Cinereous Vultures
(Aegypius monachus) from Mongolia to the Republic of Korea
Richard P. Reading1*
& (alphabetically) John Azua1, Nanette Bragin1, Onolragchaa Ganbold2,
Travis Garrett1, David Kenny1, Hansoo Lee3, Woon Kee Paek4, Mary Jo
Denver Zoological Foundation, 2300 Steele Street, Denver, Colorado 80205 USA. Mongolian Conservation Coalition & Denver Zoological Foundation – Mongolia Program, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Korea Institute of Environmental Ecology, 754 Gwanpyungdong, Yusunggu Daejeon 305-301, Republic of Korea. Korean National Science Museum, Republic of Korea. * +1 (720) 337-1545; FAX +1 (720) 337-1406; rreading@denverzoo.org Many species, especial y birds, undergo seasonal migrations presumably to increase fitness, although this remains poorly documented. General y, juvenile birds learn migration routes from their parents or their ability appears innate (i.e., requires no learning). Here we report on an apparent human-induced migration of juvenile Cinereous, or Eurasian Black, Vultures (Aegypius monachus) from their breeding grounds in Mongolia to wintering grounds in the Republic of Korea (i.e., South Korea). We used global positioning system (GPS)/satellite and GPS/cel phone telemetry units to track movements of Cinereous Vultures in Mongolia and South Korea, and then employed a geographic information system (GIS) to map home ranges and migration routes. We found that juvenile vultures migrate thousands of km from Mongolia to winter in South Korea and spend the rest of the year in Mongolia. Adult vultures from Mongolia do not migrate, but remain in Mongolia year round. It appears that provisioning of food for vultures in "vulture restaurants" in South Korea that began in the late 1990s induced an increased migration pattern in Cinereous Vultures. Migration of only juvenile birds is apparently rare and this seemingly "new," human-induced migration appears to be unique and demonstrates the flexibility of these birds seem in finding and exploiting new food sources far from their natal areas. These results have important implications for conservation, such as the need to protect migratory paths and stop-over points between Mongolia and Korea. Our results also suggest flexibility in at least some species of birds that may serve them well as the world's climate changes. Key Words: Eurasian Black Vulture, movement patterns, satellite telemetry, vulture restaurant The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
The important of small islands for stopover site during migration
of Oriental Honey Buzzards in Indonesia
Syartiniliaa, Anggi Mardiyantoa, Hendry Pramonob, Afra D. N. Makalewa,
Yeni A. Mulyanib, Hiroyoshi Higuchic
aDepartment of Landscape Architecture, Faculty of Agriculture, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), Meranti St. IPB Darmaga, Bogor 16680, Indonesia bDepartment of Forest Resources Conservation and Ecotourism, Faculty of Forestry, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), Jl. Meranti, Kampus IPB, Darmaga, Bogor 16680, Indonesia cGraduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Endo 5322, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 252-0882, Japan Small island is an area, which is highly vulnerable to disturbances (human induced) and changes (climate change). Oriental Honey Buzzards (OHBs, Pernis ptilorhynchus) are migratory raptors, which have satellite-tracked since 2003. They often use small islands as resting site before they reach their wintering habitat in Indonesia. Some of small islands have critically important role for succeeding the migration. Destruction of stopover habitats may influence the survival of migratory raptors. This paper provides information on landscape characteristics of stopover habitat and recommendation for managing the habitat. This study was conducted in Rupat and Belitung Island, Indonesia. Based on satellite-tracking data, Rupat and Belitung Island have already known as the important stopover site before entering Sumatra and Borneo Island, respectively. Analysis was conducted by integrating satellite-tracking data and Geographical Information System (GIS), and direct observation. Landscape characteristics of stopover habitat were predicting using presence data derived from satellite tracking data through the application of Logistic Regression (LR) coupled with RAMAS GIS. Totally we used twenty-four individuals of satellite-tracked OHBs (2003-2009) data that have stopover habitat in Rupat and Belitung Island. Results of this study showed that Rupat and Belitung islands have important role as stepping- stonebefore entering the big island in Indonesia. The main landscape characteristics were highly influenced by OHB's need for food which showing that they preferred to select the site with characteristics for hunting area. Stopover habitat characteristics also affected the behavior of OHBs during their stay. Identification of these landscape characteristics provides baseline information for ecological-based development particularly for managing small island as important stopover habitat for migratory Keywords: landscape characteristics; logistic regression, Pernis ptilorhynchus; satellite- tracking; stopover habitat The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
East to West Migration of Steppe Eagle (Aquila nipalensis nipalensis)
and other raptors at Thoolakharka Nepal
Tulsi Subedi1, Sandesh Gurung2, Surya Gurung3 and Robert DeCandido4
1Himalayan Nature, P.O.Box: 10918, Lazimpat, Kathmandu, Nepal, 2 Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal 3Dhikur Pokhari VDC 6, Kaski District, Gandaki Zone, Nepal, 4 Dr. Robert DeCandido, 1831 Fowler Avenue,The Bronx, New York 10462 This study on the east to west migration of the Steppe Eagle Aquila nipalensis nipalensis was conducted in central west Nepal in the smal mountain town of Thoolakharka (28018.188' N, 083049.788'; Elevation 2,050 m). We counted Steppe Eagles and 36 other raptor species on migration from mid-September through early December in 2012-2014. Our counts ranged from 6,000 to 8,000 Steppe Eagles per year leaving the Tibetan plateau and northern Asia, and heading southwest through the Himalayan Mountains to winter in Nepal and points to the west. Steppe Eagle migration began each year in early October and continued through early December. The highest single hour count was 308 Steppe Eagles between 14h00 to 15h00 on 21 Nov 2013, and the highest daily count was 1,102 eagles on 20 November 2013. Though migrating eagles were observed from 08h00 to 17h00, the peak of the flight occurred in the afternoon hours (12h00 to 16h00), with highest numbers between 14h00 to 15h00. In 2012-2014 only 33% of Steppe Eagles passed before 12h00, while 67% passed between At our Thoolakharka watch site, >60% Steppe Eagles that passed overhead were aged during 2012-2014. Of these, we placed each migrating eagle into one of three age classes based upon plumage characteristics: Juvenile (birds hatched that year); Sub-adult (second to fourth year birds); and Adult (individuals five or more years old). Overal in 2012-2014, we counted 20% juveniles, 37% sub-adults and 43% adults with a median passage date of 15 November for juveniles; 18 November for sub-adults; and 19 November for adults. A t-test for juvenile vs adults (t= 3.55, df = 83, p=0.0006), and juvenile vs sub-adults (t=3.64, df = 98, p=0.0004) shows that juvenile Steppe Eagles are seen on migration earlier than adults and sub-adults. Similarly an ANOVA test (F = 0.96, df = 196, p = 0.38) shows there is not any significance difference of the migration dates of the different age classes of Steppe Eagles 2012-2014. Although different raptor species have their own timing of migration at Thoolakharka, our data show mid- November as the best time to see the largest movement of Steppe Eagles. Key words: Steppe Eagle, Migration, Thoolakharka, Nepal The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
The development of raptor migration ecotourism as a conservation
objective at Rupat Island, Sumatra
Yera putri rahayu
Biology Dept.In Andalas University, Indonesia and Raptor Study Group Malaysian Nature Society Rupat Island, off south-eastern Sumatra, is on the migration corridor and stop over site for migratory raptors in eastern Asia. Rupat has an area of 1,500km2and is covered by mangrove swamp forest and production forest. Clearing of forest for timber production and plantations, forest burning that cause haze and the capture of migrant raptors for sale affect the survival of migratory raptors that fly into and out of Rupat during the migratory season. Due to the situation in Rupat and to detect the effect of haze on the migratory raptors, we carried out observations on raptor migration with the objective of developing basic tourism for conservation. We compared the abundance of migratory raptors in spring and autumn seasons and identified their habitats in order to develop raptor migration as an ecotourism product for conservation. Data for this research were obtained from direct observations, interviews and questionnaires. Observations of migratory raptors adopted the point count method and started at around 06h30 hrs, roughly 30 minutes after sunrise, and ended at 16h00 hrs. The research samples included all migratory raptors that arrived in and flew out of Rupat,the local people and visitors.During 10 days of observation from 19 - 28 October 2014 (autumn migration), we recorded 518 raptors, including 336 Oriental Honey Buzzards, 43 Black Bazas, 84 Chinese Sparrowhawks, 42 Japanese Sparrowhawks, 1 Peregrine Falcon and 12 unidentified raptors. During 3 days of observation from 10-12 March 2015(spring migration), we recorded 4,501 raptors, including 4,499 Oriental Honey Buzzardsand 2 Chinese Sparrowhawks. Our results showed that the abundance of raptors in October 2014 was lower compared to March 2015.The low number of raptors in October 2014 was due to the 4 days of haze and 2 days of rain which caused the migratory raptors to make landfall at Tanjung Punak. Although haze occurred in Rupat in March 2015, there was good weather at the observation site in Teluk Rhu and migration appeared not to be affected. The assumption that migratory raptors roost in Teluk Rhu before migrating across the Straits of Malacca was confirmed in March 2015 with sightings of an Oriental Honey Buzzard perched on a coconut palm behind houses and many others taking off from the mangrove forest. Our research concluded that Rupat island important stop over site for migrant raptors. However, changes in forest cover and forest clearing by burning are threatening the habitat of migratory raptors. To suppress such threats, there is a need to carry out conservation of migratory raptors and their habitats. Raptor migration has become an attraction for bird enthusiasts from all walks of life and can be used as a product of ecotourism to attract locals. The results of interviews and questionaires showed that Rupat island has become a beach resort with cultural attractions and is drawing local residents as well as visitors from outside the region. With tourism already established in Rupat Island, a conservation program for migratory raptors can be developed into an ecotourism event that can benefit the local population and the government. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Oral Presentation
Reproduction, Habitat and
Behavior Session
The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Hope for Threatened Tropical Forest Raptors: Lessons from
the Philippine Eagle Conservation Program
Dennis I. Salvador and Jayson C. Ibaňez.
Philippine Eagle Foundation. Philippine Eagle Center, Malagos District, Davao City. 8000. Philippines. The Philippine Eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) is an IUCN critically endangered species that is found only in the Philippine archipelago where it is country's national bird. Because of the massive decimation of its primary forest habitat and continuing human persecution, the species remains at the verge of extinction. Is the Philippine's top forest predator doomed to extinction? We review four decades of conservation efforts, focusing on the results in wild population monitoring, habitat protection, community-based conservation, public education, test releases, policy formulation and law enforcement, including new ecological information generated from the four islands where the species exists. And, not al hope is lost. Although the status of the Philippine Eagle remains precarious, we conclude that the breadth of success indicators in the four major islands where it is historically found are promising and that the efforts to save the Philippine Eagle from extinction as a flagship for forest biodiversity conservation in the Philippines is not a lost cause. Keywords: Philippine eagle, Philippines, holistic conservation, Philippine Eagle The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Population Status and Distribution of Black Kite (Milvus migrans)
in Sambhal District, Uttar Pradesh, India
Adesh Kumar and Amita Kanaujia
Biodiversity & Wildlife Conservation Lab, Department of Zoology University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 Uttar Pradesh, India adesh.science@gmail.com The Black Kite is perhaps the world's most abundant bird of prey. Not surprisingly for a species with such a colossal range, up to 12 subspecies have been described, with between six and eight commonly recognized. Unlike others of the group, Black Kites are opportunistic hunters and are more likely to scavenge. Although stil large in number, the population is declining when compared to past but in our study area the trend of population growth is continuously increasing. There is no survey on black kite was previously conducted in western Uttar Pradesh. This lack of information makes it complicated to take effective measures for their management. The present study was performed to assess the distribution and population status of Black Kite in Sambhal District of Uttar Pradesh from June 2013 to March 2015. Survey is being carried out seasonal y, on foot or vehicle according to the area. Observations are being carried out using ‘encounter transect' and ‘roost count' method with the aid of 10x50 binoculars and data is supported with photography using Canon EOS 1000 DSLR camera. The study revealed that black kite distributed throughout the district and distribution is influenced by food availability and nesting site. Total 53 roosting, 36 feeding and 74 breeding sites were recorded in study region. The estimated population sizes were 4,245 and 4,861 in 2013-14 and 2014-15 respectively. Maximum population was seen in Begumpur and Tasspur and minimum population were observed in Fateul ah Srai and Betla respectively during study period. Study area abode of a good population of black kite because there are much food availability and nesting and roosting sites. Sambhal district is famous for bone and horn handicraft work and a big supplier of frozen meat all over the country. In study region 36 slaughter house and 12 bone mills are situated which provide fine amount of food for Black Kite. Although study area has good population size but due to cutting of nesting trees, unsustainable development and increase in human population caused shrinking of habitat of black kite which may limit the Black Kite population in coming years. The study recommends the protection Black Kite habitat as wel as promotion of trees preferred for nesting Keywords: Black Kite, Population, Nesting Site, Habitat The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Impact of Upcoming Tourism and Running Railway Tract on Vultures
in Deogarh, Lalitpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
Amita Kanaujia and Sonika Kushwaha
Biodiversity and Wildlife Conservation Lab, Department of Zoology University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 Uttar Pradesh, India The declining vulture population from last few decades has attracted many biologists to find out the exact reason of sudden decline of their population. There is no single reason which can be claimed as the foremost reason for their decline. A single global reason of diclofenec has been claimed by most of the ecologists as the major cause but actual y there are other local reasons which have inflicted the vulture population in their respective areas. The most alarming example is the Bundelkhand region which constitutes some of the districts of both Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh, within the boundaries of India. The most promising population of Gyps species is found in the Bundelkhand region at Deogarh, Lalitpur, U.P. Approximately 500 vultures are breeding successfully in the cliffs of Deogarh along the side of River Betwa. The maximum numbers are of Gyps indicus (Long-bil ed Vultures) fol owed by Neophron percnopterus (Egyptian Vulture) which is further fol owed by few breeding pairs of Sarcogyps calvus (King Vulture). Deograh, Lalitpur is situated along the coordinates and 24031'33.6" N & 78014'16.8" E and 24.6800° N, 78.4200° E respectively, is an area with lots of cliffs running about 10 km next to river Betwa . The area is part of Mahaveera Swami Sanctuary popularly nomenclature on the name of Jain lord Mahaveera and hence there are several Jain temples. The temperature Ranges from 240C to 490C during summer and during winter 20C to 350C.Deogarh as the name depicts is the fort of Gods and Goddess, abodes large numbers of temple related to several Gods and Goddesses of Indian mythology. Recently the Archeological Department of India have excavated large number of wal painting related to lord Mahaveera inside the cliffs. Hence Deogarh has become the place with ecological and archeological significance. It attracts large number of tourists throughout the year including Archeologist, Geologist, Historians, Educationists, Janis and Researchers from different fields. On the efforts of Archeological Department of India and Ministry of Culture now the Deogarh is being connected to the rest of part of state with better roadways as wel as a broad gauze railway line passing to Lalitpur touching the boundary of Deogarh ,which connects the North India to others parts of central India. Every year so many tourists come to Deogarh at places which are next to vultures colonies. Some of the sadhus have stationed themselves permanently within the cliffs next to vulture's colonies such as Muchkund's Cave. Ranchorr Temple which used to be a symbolic hundreds of years old smal temple of Lord Krishna has now been converted into a huge temple covering several hectares of land. Lot of ceremonies and rituals are performed from time to time now in that area which was once to be a neglected one. People in Deogarh are involved in agriculture as wel as livestock management. The livestock data is very high but mostly the cattle, cow, buffalos and goats are of low breed and once they are old they are abundant to roam about as feral animals. The starved animals unfortunately dies on the railway track on which then the vultures feeds voraciously and the secondary data reveals that often the vultures die on the railway track as they are run off by the passing trains. On the other side promoting tourism is an important part of Indian economy but the monitored tourism wil help in restoring the population of schedule I bird" vultures " in their natural abode over which the government is spending Crores of money. Prohibition on capturing of land in unprotected area on the name of religion and culture and total ban on uncontrol ed activities which destroy the environmental sanctity is must to control the situation. Keywords: Vultures, Deogarh, Lalitpur, Temple The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Saving the Last Forest of Kondang Merak using Raptor and Habitat
Conservation through Ethnography, Ecotourism, Edutourism
and Soft Campaign (E3+S)
Andik Syaifudin & Heru Cahyono
Jl. Graha Dewata JJ5 No.10 Malang – East Java, Indonesia hc_garuda@yahoo.com Located in South Malang, East Java, the area of Kondang Merak covers a beach and a 1,989-Ha protection forest. 120 bird species including 17 raptors have been recorded here, with the Javan Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus bartelsi) as one of the key species despite the rich biodiversity, the protection and environmental education levels are seemingly low, as marked by the high number of poaching and bird hunting. Other threats comes from iron-sand exploitation and road opening which cuts right through the heart of the forest. Several efforts have been taken to solve these problems, like environmental education and information dissemination. Being discontinuous, the efforts were not effective. Thus, ethnographic approach had to be taken, by doing participant observation which involved a key informant. It was followed by ecotourism, edutourism, and soft campaign with the local people for four years. As results, we witnessed a successful breedings of a Crested Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus cirrhatus) and two of the Javan Hawk-eagle. These efforts is also effective in reducing the number of poaching and bird hunting in Kondang Keywords : protection, conservation, E3+S, Kondang Merak, raptor The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Ground nesting raptors of Mongolia
1,2Gombobaatar Sundev*,3Reuven Yosef,
4Eugene Potapov, 1Odkhuu Biraazana, 1Usukhjargal Dorj
1School of Arts and Sciences, National University of Mongolia 2Mongolian Ornithological Society 3Department of Life Sciences, Ben Gurion University, Israel 4Bryn Athyn College, USA Mongolia is one of the important breeding grounds for steppe raptors in Asia. To date, 44 species were recorded, of which 25 species breed from the Siberian boreal forest to Central Asian Gobi desert covering steppe, forest steppe, and desert steppe ecological zones. In the Mongolian steppe, Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug), Steppe Eagle (Aquila nipalensis), Upland Buzzard (Buteo hemilasius), Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Cinereous Vulture (Aegypius monachus), Lesser (F. naumanni) and Common Kestrels (F. tinnunculus) breed in on the ground, on cliffs, rock boulders, tree patches, and artifacts. Among the steppe raptors, Saker Falcon, Steppe Eagle, and Upland Buzzard are true ground nesters. The303 breeding pairs of Saker Falcon observed between 1998-2006, were found in 21 typesof substrates: 26% on cliff ledges and cavities, 16% on rock column, 1% on the ground, 0.7% in trees, and 0.3% in sandy precipices, and 57% in artificial nest substrates. Most ground nesting Sakers used old Upland Buzzard nests. An average of four chicks fledged from these nests. Al ground nests had a choice of available vacant nests built by Upland Buzzard and Raven (Corvus corax) on artificial and natural substrates. Ground nesting Saker pairs were located close to busy car road and/or a dwel ing of local hersdsmen. We believe that such juxtaposition of nest is predetermined by a desire to minimize disturbance from predators such as Grey Wolf (Canis lupus) and Eurasian Badger (Meles meles). The major food source in the area was Brandt's Vole (Lasiopodomys brandti). We conclude that the primary reason Saker Falcons opt to nest on the ground is food abundance and ease of access. The Steppe Eagle is a breeding migratory species in Mongolia. We monitored 49 breeding pairs between 1998-2007 during varying conditions of food availability, altitudes and regions of the country. Eagles selected seven types of natural nest substrates –91% nested on the ground (48% in rock column, 33% in breaking rocks, 9% on cliffs, 2% in trees) and 9% on artifacts (car cabin (4%), car tire (2%) and artificial nest platforms (2%)). Breeding pairs prefer to nest in the midst of 20-30 m high rocks, or on top of rock columns, or on hil sides in the center of active colonies of Brandt's Vole. There was no difference between type of nesting substrates and number of eggs laid and hatched, or number of young fledged. Food availability and abundance appear to be a limiting factor for ground nesting Steppe Eagles in the steppe. The Upland Buzzard is a resident breeding species in the country. We found a total of 24 different nest sites from 1998 to 2007. Most nests were on the ground (23%, n=69), artificial nest substrates (three-legged pole, single pole, car tire on poles, pylons) (20%, n=60), rocky outcrops with column (17%, n=51) or cliffs (9%, n=27), A-type wooden utility poles (5%, n=16), and others (26%). We found that breeding pairs built their nests on the ground depending on the density of Brandt's Vole. Our data show that one of the main reasons for reduced clutch size and number of chicks was the vole availability in the steppe. We documented egg desertification and high mortality of chicks caused by starvation, cannibalism and predation as result of a crash of the vole population in the area; and is the reason for a high and positive correlation between average number of chicks fledged and vole density. Golden Eagle and Cinereous Vulture occasional y build their nests in smal rock boulders and cliffs up to 1 -3 m on hil side and mountain slopes in the steppe. Lesser and Common Kestrels use rock crevices and holes in smal cliff face and rocks of 0.5 m height. We conclude that the continued survival of the ground nesting raptors on the Mongolian steppe is heavily dependent on the health of Brandt's Vole populations, and of conservation concern. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Trophic ecology of sympatric Northern Boobooks (Ninox japonica)
and Oriental Scops Owls(Otus sunia)
Han-kyu Kim1, Woo-shin Lee
200-7213, CALS, Seoul National University, San56-1, Shinlim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, Korea 1Cyaneus87@gmail.com Two sympatric species that have similar trophic niche may compete over prey resources, or avoid such competition by separating their use of prey type, foraging dimension, and/or foraging timing. In raptors, study of diet has been often used to show the difference of trophic ecology of two or more species from the same community. Prey remains, pel et castings, fecal analysis, and/or direct observation of prey taken by birds are the most common and direct method to understand species' prey use. However, the field application of these methods for studying prey use of two forest dwel ing insectivorous owl species, Northern Boobooks (Ninox japonica) and Oriental Scops Owls (Otus sunia), is difficult in dense forests in Korea. These two owl species are both migratory breeders that has short window of study period since they breed during May to August, and migrate to wintering grounds at South-east Asia during September and October. In addition, smal pel et castings that decompose quickly in frequent precipitation and high temperature in summer months prohibit studying pel et compositions. Northern Boobooks and Oriental Scops Owls are known to have majorly insectivorous diet, which produce relatively soft pel ets than those of birds that use vertebrate preys. Recently, stable isotope ratio analysis has been increasingly used in trophic ecology of birds and other organisms, especial y for organisms that have prey types and/or foraging behavior difficult to study with classical methods. To compare trophic positions and diet use of two owl species, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio of potential prey items and whole blood of owls were analyzed to estimate prey composition of each owl species at Gwang-neung Forest, Korea. Potential preys were pooled into 4 distinct groups (aerial insects, ground/foliage insects, rodents, and birds), by their behavioral aspect and taxonomic group. Based on Bayesian multi- source mixing model (R package ‘siar'), Northern Boobooks utilized more rodents and birds than invertebrate prey, and aerial insects consisted higher proportion than ground/foliage insects. Oriental Scops Owls, on the other hand utilized more ground insects and rodents than birds and aerial insects. Northern Boobooks and Oriental Scops Owls were described as mainly insectivorous species in literature, however, in this stable isotope approach, more vertebrate prey were assimilated in their tissue during early breeding period. Also, this approach shows their differential prey composition by different hunting behavior, as Oriental Scops Owls are more gleaners and ground foragers, not like Northern Boobooks, which prey on aerial insects. Overal , Northern Boobooks had c. 3.0‰ higher nitrogen stable isotope ratio and larger variance in carbon Stable Isotope Ratio. Oriental Scops Owls and Northern Boobooks at Gwang-neung forest showed clear difference in trophic niche and found to be using different food sources, as wel as utilizing different spatial structure in the forest. Keywords: Otus sunia, Ninox japonica, Stable isotope, mixing model, trophic niche The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
First record of nests and breeding success of Red-headed Vulture
Sarcogyps calvus and implementation of Vulture Conservation Programs
in Nepal
Hemanta Dhakal
Local Organization for Research and Development (LORD) Subhkamana Path, Lakeside, Pokhara-6, Nepal The Red-headed Vulture Sarcogyps calvus (RHV) was historically common in the West Himalayan foothills but its population has declined in the entire Indian subcontinent (Nadeem et al. 2007and Cuthbert et al. 2006). The objectives of our study were to detect the nest sites and document breeding success of the critically endangered Red-headed Vulture (RHV) in the West Himalayas. We surveyed 14 districts (Arghakhanchi, Palpa, Gulmi, Syanga, Pyuthan, Dang, Lamjung, Kaski, Surkhet, Baglung Parbat, Tanahu, Damauli and Jajarkot) of Western Nepal. We observed 28 RHV were encountered flying, roosting, nesting and feeding. Three nests, two from Palpa and one from Jajarkot were recorded between December 25, 2011 to January 2014. Breeding success at two nests was 100%. During the survey Vulture Conservation Awareness Programs were implemented. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Behavioral assessment methods to identify the degree
of habituation in raptors
Inge H.M. Tielen
Wanicare Foundation, Cikananga Wildlife Rescue Center, Sukabumi, West-Java, Indonesia. ingetielen@yahoo.com Although al raptor species in Indonesia are protected by law, the il egal trade of wild-caught raptors is not decreasing and on average about 100 raptors are being confiscated every year from private owners or traders. Releasing these confiscated raptors is a great chal enge, not only due to the lack of suitable habitat, but mainly because most individuals are habituated to humans. Released raptors are frequently observed near human settlements, as these raptors learned in the past that humans provide food. The survival rate of these individuals is low and in addition it can cause conflicts as raptors have been confirmed attacking people to defend their territory close to human settlements. Behavioural features or problems that arise when raptors are habituated to humans have been described, but behavioural research is limited. Developing methods to measure the degree of habituation and identify which individuals can be rehabilitated and released is one of the biggest chal enges for raptor programs in Indonesia. Recent long term behavioural research gave new insights in the time budget, behavioural development and feeding behaviour of raptors with different Individuals that spend less time in captivity showed a quicker increase of time spent on foraging and extra alertness when people were close. In addition our first results also give new understanding in feeding behaviour, as results indicate that vigilance episodes between ingesting their prey are more frequent in raptors with a greater fleeing response, which is again related to time and conditions in captivity. We aim to use these results to develop a new approach to select eagles for rehabilitation and release, however limited data about release success currently slows this process. Nevertheless are these results a big step forward to a better understanding of the consequences of captivity on raptor behaviour. Keywords: raptors, rehabilitation, habituation, foraging, feeding behavior The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Post-fledging movements and survival of juvenile Saker Falcons
(Falco cherrug) from artificial and natural nest sites in Mongolia
Md Lutfor Rahman1, Nyambayar Batbayar2,
Gankhuyag Purev-Ochir2 and Andrew Dixon1
1. International Wildlife Consultants Ltd, P.O. Box 19, Carmarthen, SA33 5YL, United Kingdom 2. Wildlife Science and Conservation Center of Mongolia, Union Building, B-802, Ulaanbaatar 14210, Mongolia We used patagial tags, VHF radio transmitters, satellite-received transmitters, ring recoveries to investigate the movements and survival of juvenile Saker Falcons (Falco cherrug) fledged from artificial nests in open landscapes and natural nest sites in hilly areas in Mongolia during 2006-2014. We have found that duration of the post-fledging dependence period (PFDP) was 40 days (range: 31-52 days). During the post-fledging dependence period juveniles progressively moved farther from their nest until dispersal from the natal area. Natal home ranges were larger for juveniles fledged at artificial (Mean 100% MCP: 0.81 ± 0.11 km2, n=53) than natural sites (Mean 100% MCP: 0.18 ± 0.03 km2, n=46) and the distance moved by juveniles during PFDP was positively related to fledging date and brood size. The mean distance moved by juveniles from artificial and natural sites was 1.5 km ± 0.09 km and 0.7 km ± 0.05 km respectively. Over the PFDP, juvenile survival being higher in early fledged broods from natural sites compared to artificial sites. Predation was identified as a major cause of mortality, especial y in open landscapes where artificial nests were erected. However, because artificial nests produced more fledglings, we found that overall productivity of juveniles to dispersal at artificial and natural nests sites did not differ significantly. We further tracked five juvenile Saker Falcons which were deployed satellite-received transmitters. Following dispersal from the natal range, whether and where juveniles established temporary settlement areas (TSAs) before initiating long distance migration was also investigated. Key words: post-fledging, Saker Falcons, survival, dispersal, migration The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Abundance of Spotted Wood Owl (Strix seloputo) in Relation to
Environmental Factors in Malaysian Oil Palm Small holdings
Muhammad Syafiq Yahya1, Chong Leong Puan1,2*, Badrul Azhar1,2,
Mohamed Zakaria1, Sharifah Nur Atikah1 & Amal Ghazali1
1Faculty of Forestry, Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia 2Biodiversity Unit, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia *Corresponding author: chongleong@upm.edu.my Spotted Wood Owl (Strix seloputo) is usually associated with semi-open habitats including urban parks and agricultural areas. To date, there is little ecological information on Spotted Wood Owl in oil palm plantations. This study examined the abundance of Spotted Wood Owl in oil palm smal holdings in Selangor state, Peninsular Malaysia as wel as environmental factors (at local and landscape levels) that influenced its relative abundance. Distance sampling was conducted from January to August 2014 at 90 points located more than 800 m between points and the survey was repeated for six times at each point. The density of Spotted Wood Owl was estimated at 0.07 ± 0.01 birds per ha, i.e. about seven to eight birds in every 100 ha. Generalized Linear Models (AIC = 89.57; R² = 22.87) indicated two predictor variables, i.e. height of oil palms (slope = 0.537) and number of houses in a 100 m radius (slope = -0.060) significantly influenced the relative abundance of the Spotted Wood Owls in oil palm smallholdings. Our results suggested that the availability of mature palms as perching sites and presence of human settlements may affect the distribution of the owls in the study areas. Due to its occurrence in oil palm smallholdings, this study proposed the potential of using native owl species such as Spotted Wood Owl to provide biological control of rodent pests similar to the sympatrical Barn Owl (Tyto alba). Keywords – Strix Seloputo, Nocturnal bird density, Oil palm, Distance sampling The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
The current conditions of Javan-Hawk Eagle's habitat remnants
in West Java, Indonesia
Nur Azmi1a, Syartinilia1b, Yeni Mulyani2
1Department of Landscape Architecture, Bogor Agricultural University, Jl. Meranti, Kampus IPB Darmaga, West Java, anur_azmi88@yahoo.com; bsyartinilia@yahoo.com 2Department of Forest Resources Conservation, Bogor Agricultural University, Jl. Meranti, Kampus IPB Darmaga, West Java, Javan Hawk-Eagle (JHE, Nisaetus bartelsi) which endemic in the natural forests of Java, Indonesia is categorized as one of the endangered raptors based on IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Smal population size, severe habitat loss, forest fragmentation, and il egal hunting have al contributed to the ‘‘endangered'' status of this species. Moreover, JHE have selected as one of priority species from 14 species, which has been incorporated into government regulations that its populations must be increased up to 3%. Unfortunately the lack of information about current conditions of the distribution of JHE's habitat remnants caused the proposing conservation strategies for this species become difficult. Our previous study (2002) was examined the high proportion of JHE's habitat remnants mainly scattered in West Java. Therefore, this research aimed to observe the current conditions of JHE's habitat remnants in West Java and compared to the previous one. In this study, we updated the predicted probability model using the same Logistic Regression model equation resulted from our previous study that is applied in RAMAS GIS v4.0 software. The satellite images used in this study composed to four scenes of Landsat 8 captured in April to June, 2014 with 30x30 m resolution. Results of this study identified 14 remnant habitat patches (3788 km2) scattered in West Java. The comparison with the previous study showed the size and number of patches was increased. Based on this fact, we recommend that JHE's habitat remnants should be connected each other for increasing the survival of JHE in the natural habitat remnants in West Java. Keywords: GIS, Habitat remnants, Logistic regression, Nisaetus bartelsi The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Breeding ecology of Lesser Kestrels (Falco naumanni)
in Ikh Nart Nature Reserve, Mongolia
Onolragchaa Ganbold1 *, Richard P. Reading2 & (alphabetically)
John Azua2, Munkhbaatar Munkhbayar1, Chimedbat Bat-Erdene1
School of Mathematics and Natural science, Mongolian National University of Education Denver Zoological Foundation, 2300 Steele Street, Denver, Colorado 80205 USA. We studied the breeding ecology of Lesser Kestrels (Falco naumanni) inhabiting Ikh Nart Nature Reserve, Mongolia from May 2012 to August 2014. Lesser kestrels do not construct nests, but instead use smal rock crevices and caves in Ikh Nart. Nest holes varied greatly in structure, with no two the same. We found a mean (±SD) nest's depth of 32 ±6.2 cm (range = 24-44.5 cm), a mean inner width of 17. 1±1.3 cm (range = 15-19 cm), a mean height of 24±19.7 (range = 12-61 cm), and mean distance between the nest and the ground of 20.3 ±6.03 m (range = 10.4-30.2 m). Lesser Kestrels breed in nesting colonies, sometimes in association with Common Kestrels (F. tinniculus). In Ikh Nart, the mean number of nests per colony was 4.1 ±2.7 (range = 2-8). We studied 9 kestrel colonies during our work, with a mean distance between nests of 99.7 m (range = 1-361m). Lesser Kestrels laid eggs between 24 May and 2 June each year. The mean clutch size was 4.0 ±0.7, with a mean incubation period of 28 ±2 days. We recorded an overal hatching success rate of 84.2% (214 of 254 eggs) and an overal fledgling success rate of 89.7% (192 of 214 nestlings). During the breeding period, male spent the most time incubating and brooding (61% of the time, compared with females who incubated and brooded 36% of the time). Neither parent incubated or brooded the clutch 3% of the time. Parents did not leave their clutches more than 30'. Smal raptors, we recorded the following mean adult Lesser Kestrel body sizes: body weight = 164.3 ±23.4 g, wingspan = 66.6 ±6.6 cm, and toe and talon = 2.99 ±0.2 cm. During the nesting period, adults preyed on a variety of insects (mostly grasshoppers; 77.2% of their prey ;), lizards (mostly toad-headed agamas, Phrenocephalus versicolor; 11.4%), smal mammals (7.46%), and small The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Current Status of Breeding Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) in Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates
Shakeel Ahmed, Shahid.B.Khan, Junid.N.Shah, Sálim Javed,
Abdullah. A. Al Hamadi, Eissa. A. Al Hamadi
Environment Agency – Abu Dhabi, P. O. Box 45553, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates In United Arab Emirates (UAE) Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) breeds in winter months on almost al undisturbed offshore and near shore islands of Abu Dhabi Emirate. It is one of the regional priority species identified for conservation in the UAE. Environment Agency – Abu Dhabi (EAD) has identified al the breeding sites and regular monitoring surveys have been carried out since 2008. In 2014, we conducted a comprehensive survey at the previously identified islands. A total of 40 islands were visited, out of theses only 32 had breeding ospreys. A total of 68 nests were recorded from al the sites; 62 were active nests and six were attended nests. The highest number of six active nests were recorded from Yasat north island (24.23178 N 52.01264 E) followed by five active nests from Mohayyamat south island (24.49045 N 51.73281 E).The number of breeding pairs recorded in 2014 were less than those recorded from the same sites in 2011. A nearly 25% decrease in the number of active nests was witnessed from 2011 to 2014. Human disturbance is viewed as the single largest cause of such decline. Several offshore islands have recently witnessed increased human activity resulting in decrease of breeding pairs. As part of conservation efforts, EAD has installed man-made osprey nesting platforms at sites where the number of active nests has plummeted due to disturbance and predation. Moreover, satellite tracking of osprey is also undertaken to study the local movement and migration of the species and to identify habitats for protection and conservation planning. The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015
Dispersal behavior of young Tawny Fish Owls at Wulin, Taiwan
Yi-Hsin Liu, Chen-Lin Wang, Shiao-Yu Hong,
Jian-Wei Zeng,Yuan-Hsun Sun
Institute of Wildlife Conservation, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan None was known about the dispersal behavior of young Tawny Fish Owl (Ketupa flavipes). We radio-tracked four young Tawny Fish Owls (two females and two males) from three nests in different years and sites in 2010-2015. These young birds started to leave their parents' territories about 8 months after fledging during late May and early June, and occasional y they returned several times before the non-return journal. One young female was found breeding 44 km away from its natal site in the fourth year, one young male wandered around its parent's territory and settled down and paired at nearby stream section in the third year. Another young male behaved in a similar pattern except that it leave Wulin in the third year and its radio signal was lost about 12 km south of the study area. One female's transmitter dropped before leaving its natal site. Keywords: dispersal, fledging, roost, Tawny Fish Owl The 9th Asian Raptor Research and Conservation Network (ARRCN) Symposium 2015,
Novotel Chumphon Beach Resort and Golf, Chumphon, Thailand; October 21–25, 2015

Source: http://www5b.biglobe.ne.jp/~raptor/Proceeding%20of%20ARRCN%20Symposium%202015%20Chumphon%20Thailand_s.pdf

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REV ARGENT NEUROC VOL. 28, Nº 3 : 78-98 2014 REVISIÓN DE LA LITERATURA Cirugía de los trastornos del comportamiento: el estado del arte Claudio Yampolsky, Damián Bendersky Servicio de Neurocirugía, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina RESUmENIntroducción: la cirugía de los trastornos del comportamiento (CTC) se está convirtiendo en un tratamiento más común desde el desarrollo de la neuromodulación. Podemos dividir su historia en 3 etapas: la primera comienza en los inicios de la psicocirugía y termina con el desarrollo de las técnicas estereotácticas, cuando comienza la segunda etapa. Ésta se caracteriza por la realización de lesiones estereotácticas. Nos encontramos transitando la tercera etapa, que comienza cuando la estimulación cerebral profunda (ECP) empieza a ser usada en CTC.Objetivo: el propósito de este artículo es realizar una revisión no sistemática de la historia, indicaciones actuales, técnicas y blancos quirúrgicos de la CTC. Resultados: a pesar de los errores graves cometidos en el pasado, hoy en día, la CTC está renaciendo. Los trastornos psiquiátricos que más frecuentemente se tratan con cirugía y los blancos estereotácticos preferidos para cada uno de ellos son: cápsula interna/estriado ventral para trastorno obsesivo-compulsivo, cíngulo subgenual para depresión y complejo centromediano/parafascicular del tálamo para síndrome de Tourette. Conclusión: los resultados de la ECP en estos trastornos parecen alentadores. Sin embargo, se necesitan más estudios randomizados para establecer la efectividad de la CTC. Debe tenerse en cuenta que una apropiada selección de pacientes nos ayudará a realizar un procedimiento más seguro así como también a lograr mejores resultados quirúrgicos, conduciendo a la CTC a ser más aceptada por psiquiatras, pacientes y sus familias. Se necesita mayor investigación en varios temas como: fisiopatología de los trastornos del comportamiento, indicaciones de CTC y nuevos blancos quirúrgicos.

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SFLS 9 OCTOBRE 2015 Ph Morlat pour le groupe d'experts ACTUALISATION 2015 • Prophylaxie pré-exposition (PrEP) • Optimisation du traitement antirétroviral en situation de succès virologique (switch) • Prise en charge des enfants et des adolescents • Désir d'enfant, grossesse (incluant prise en charge du